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China Memes & Viral

China Orders Closure of American Consulate in Chengdu, Weibo Responds: “Let’s Turn It Into a Hotpot Restaurant”

If it were up to Weibo users, America’s consulate in Chengdu, that’s been ordered to close, will be the next hotpot joint in town.

Manya Koetse

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The US-ordered closure of the Chinese consulate in Houston was big news on Weibo yesterday.

Today, it is the China-ordered closure of the American consulate in Chengdu that has become the number one trending topic on the social media site. The topic page garnered over 870 million views on Weibo just after 5 pm Beijing time.

The closure of the US Consulate in Chengdu is no 1 trending topic on Weibo on July 24.

On July 24, China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs notified the United States Consulate that its permission to operate in Chengdu was revoked and that it needs to halt all operations.

PRC Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying (华春莹) tweeted on July 24 that the move is a “legitimate & necessary response to the unilateral provocative move by the US to demand the closure of China’s Consulate General in Houston.”

China state media outlet CCTV posted a blue banner on social media with the characters “反制” on it, meaning “to hit back” (or: “retaliation”).

According to the BBC, the American side has been given the time until Monday to close its Chengdu consulate. The United States Consulate at Chengdu opened in 1985.

Similarly, the Chinese consulate in Houston, the first Chinese consulate in the United States, was only given 72 hours to leave the compound, leading to the alleged burning of paper documents in the consulate courtyard.

On Weibo, over two million people ‘liked’ one of the news posts reporting on the closure of the consulate in Chengdu. The most popular comment of the comment thread, receiving over 231,000 ‘thumbs up’ suggested to “directly turn [the consulate] into a hotpot restaurant.”

Chengdu is one of China’s authentic hotpot hot spots, and is famous for its Sichuan hotpot, with many hotpot restaurants scattered around the city.

“I’ve already got a hotpot restaurant name ready, when can we move in?”, one commenter suggested, with others responding that the only suitable name for the imaginary hotpot place would be “Trump Hotpot.”

A photoshopped design of the future hotpot place was shared on Weibo and Douyin.

Many commenters applauded China’s response to American actions and support the ordered closure of the consulate and called it “delightful”, “as long as they don’t take our hotpot recipes with them.”

Others also joke: “The Chengdu American consulate has been frantically stealing our secret hotpot recipes, they’re a threat to our hotpot culture!”

According to reports on Weibo, people were hanging around the American consulate on Friday afternoon “in hopes of seeing some smoke,” with many expecting there to be some document-burning.

Meanwhile, a live streaming channel of CCTV broadcasting scenes around the consulate received a staggering 34 million views on Friday evening, Beijing time. Some people commented that they wanted to see what was happening around the area to “witness history.”

Weibo users shared videos of someone allegedly setting off firecrackers near the consulate on Friday evening.

One CGTN reporter who was reporting from the scene said that there was “no need to panic” because “local residents are having a wedding today” (see video embedded below). The reporter received some criticism from individual Weibo users who wrote it was not right for her to report something that was “not actually true.”

Photos of a man being taken away by the police in relation to the firecracker incident was individually reposted on Weibo many times, with netizens praising the “uncle” or “brother.”

A milk tea and ice jelly shop near the consulate did good business on Friday night with so many people hanging around to see if something would happen. “They’re the real winners of today,” one Weibo user said.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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  1. Pingback: Chinese Researchers Arrested in U.S. as Beijing Hits Back for Consulate Closure - EuroNews

  2. Pingback: Chinese nationalists call online for more retaliation measures against US diplomacy that targets Beijing · Global Voices – NewsForTime

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China Health & Science

China’s COVID-19 Vaccine Freebies: Get One Vaccine, Get Milk & Eggs for Free!

“Do I get free transport and a freebie with that vaccine?”

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While American vaccine incentives – where some counties would offer a free beer and fries to encourage more Americans to get the COVID-19 vaccine – made international headlines, Chinese vaccine incentives have also been attracting the attention on Weibo and beyond.

Forget about free beer and fries. How about getting free milk, eggs, toilet paper, laundry detergent, or sesame oil after getting your shot? In China, and especially in Shanghai, some local vaccine sites have been offering all kinds of noteworthy freebies to encourage citizens to come and get their shots.

Since March and April of this year, netizens are sharing photos of COVID-19 vaccine posters online, such as this one, where you get a carton of milk after getting vaccinated:

Or these, where you get free vegetable oil or sesame oil:

Or how about two boxes of eggs?

One local initiative even offered free toilet paper earlier this year:

Another place in Shanghai offered bags of rice for free with your shot:

And others offered free pick-up services to those getting vaccinated:

Here you see people leaving with their milk cartons (and vaccinated!):

The freebies were meant to encourage more people to get their shots. But because of recent new COVID-19 cases in places like Anhui and Liaoning, more people are now in a rush to get vaccinated. Viral videos and posts on social media showed long queues at vaccine sites.

Popular WeChat account Xinwenge (新闻哥) reported a rapid shift in attitudes among young people towards getting the vaccine, from “do I get free transport and a freebie with that vaccine?” to “I’ll stand in line and do anything as long as I can get vaccinated.”

“Confirmed local cases will motivate people more [to get the vaccine] than eggs and milk,” one blogger from Guangdong wrote on Weibo.

Despite the surge of people going out to get their vaccine, some places still offer vaccine freebies. On social media, people are sharing the photos of their ‘vaccine souvenirs’; plastic bags with milk and cookies.

One Weibo user writes: “I was never so enthusiastic about getting my shot, until I heard they offered free milk and laundry detergent.”

Another Weibo user also shows off their ‘vaccine present’, getting free milk, soap, and rice with their COVID-19 vaccine: “And I didn’t even have to stand in line!”

By Manya Koetse & Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

Train Fight Between Chinese and Foreign Passenger over Mask-Wearing Goes Viral on Douyin

A video that shows a foreign man yelling at a Chinese woman on the high-speed train has gone viral on Chinese social media.

Manya Koetse

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“She is not the owner of the train! Shut up!” A short video of a quarrel on a train between a foreign man and a Chinese woman has gone viral on Chinese social media.

In the video, a Chinese woman can be heard yelling to a foreign man, saying: “Why can he go without a face mask?! Does he have special privilege? What is he doing in China if he doesn’t follow the rules?” The man then says: “She needs to shut up, she is harassing me!” A train attendant standing in between the passenger seats tries to calm down both passengers.

The incident reportedly took place on the G7530 high-speed train from Ninghai to Shanghai on May 5, where a dispute started over the man allegedly refusing to wear a face mask. The man does wear a face mask in the video.

The video went viral on Douyin, the Chinese TikTok, and also made its rounds on Kuaishou and Weibo (#阿姨怒怼不戴口罩外籍乘客#, #外籍男子未戴口罩还狂怼邻座阿姨#, #官方回应老外乘高铁拒戴口罩#).

The video sparked some anti-foreign sentiments on Weibo, where some commenters called the man a “foreign devil” or “foreign trash,” with others condemning his aggressive behavior and telling him to get out of China.

Shanghai Railways addressed the incident on its social media channel, confirming that the train conductor on the G7530 train indeed came across two passengers arguing because the foreign man was not wearing his mask correctly. In the post, the railways reminded all passengers to properly wear their masks while on the train.

Among the hundreds of people commenting on the statement, there are many who feel the train staff have been too lenient with the passenger.

This is not the first incident where foreigners make it to the (local) news in China for not wearing a mask. In April of 2020, a foreign man was detained in Beijing after he attempted to walk into a neighborhood community without a mask and then became aggressive with local security guards who wanted him to wear a face mask.

In December of 2020, another foreign man was filmed and triggered online anger as he walked around Wenzhou station not wearing a face mask, without anyone reminding him to wear one.

When it comes to train fights, the most famous ones are that of the ‘high speed train tyrant’ and the ‘train tyrant women.’ Both passengers went viral in 2018 for refusing to give up their seats although they were assigned to other passengers. At the time, both passengers were fined for their unruly behavior.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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