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Getting on the Pokémon Bus: Taiwan’s Booming Pokémon Go Business

The highly anticipated release of Pokemon Go in Taiwan on August 6th has led to a true Pokemon Go craze. It has brought about a thriving Pokemon Go business – introducing anything from Pokemon Go university courses to Pokemon Go bus tours.

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The highly anticipated release of Pokémon Go in Taiwan on August 6th has led to a national Pokémon Go craze. It has brought about a thriving Pokémon business – introducing anything from Pokémon Go university courses to Pokémon Go bus tours.

After a month of waiting impatiently, Taiwan has finally welcomed the global Pokémon Go hype on August 6th. The Taiwan arrival of the game, where players locate and ‘capture’ virtual creatures called Pokémon with their mobile device, soon become a much-talked about topic on social media, anywhere from Weibo to Twitter.

John Hanke, the man behind the game, welcomed Taiwan to the Pokémon Go family with a friendly Tweet in traditional Chinese, saying: “Taiwan – Welcome to Pokémon Go.”

 

“National Taiwan University offers a special Pokémon course: ‘A Study on Pokémon.'”

 

The innocent Tweet soon triggered some animosity from mainland netizens who angrily asked why Pokémon Go was available in Taiwan but not in mainland China, where the game yet remains inaccessible.

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Despite this little controversy, the Pokémon craze in Taiwan is just as crazy as it is in the rest of the world. So crazy, in fact, that Taiwan’s top university National Taiwan University has even decided to offer a special Pokémon course.

The course is called “A Study on Pokémon“. Perhaps contrary to expectations, it will not teach about all the Pokémon in the game or how to catch them. Instead, it offers a study into the Pokémon phenomenon from a scientific and legal angle.

 

“Pokémon Go resulted in more than 800 traffic fines just three days after the game became available in Taiwan.”

 

Like in the rest of the world, Pokémon Go is also causing some trouble here in Taiwan. News has been coming in of people playing the game while driving their car, or riding their scooter with one hand while trying to catch Pokémon with the other.

The arrival of Pokémon Go resulted in more than 800 traffic fines just three days after the game became available in Taiwan.

At the Taipei Zoo, special signs inform visitors about the right way to play Pokémon Go whilst visiting the park, humorously reminding them to mind their step and the animals when playing.

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A resourceful Taiwanese netizen came up with a new business idea after hearing about all the accidents caused by the game. Vera Lin posted her chauffeur services on her Facebook page. For NT$ 650 (±US$20), she said, players in the Taoyuan area could hire her to drive them around town on her scooter while they could catch Pokémon.

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Her business allegedly also included other special services. “While in transit,” Lin wrote, “if you see someone you like, I can stop the scooter and get their phone number or ask for a photo on your behalf.” Sadly, to the dismay of many male netizens, it turned out Ms. Lin didn’t even know how to ride a bicycle.

 

“Pokémon bus tours: an experienced Pokémon trainer will be on the bus to share his tips and tricks on playing the game.”

 

Though Vera Lin’s services are fake, there are real services in Taiwan that offer to chauffeur players around town to catch ‘em all. For NT$ 3000 (±US$96) players can hire a taxi for 8 hours to drive them around town.

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Taiwanese travel e-commerce platform KKday introduced Pokémon-themed bus tours around Taipei as a way to promote their business. The Pokémon Go tours, that were offered from August 11-13, were free and were led by an experienced Pokémon Go player. Pokémon bus tours have also become news on Sina Weibo.

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During the KKday Pokémon tours, professional Pokémon Go player Hsu Chieh showed participants how & where to catch Pokémon. The tour also visited local attractions while playing the game. The promotional tours turned out to be very successful, as 1000 fans registered to participate.

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Local tour agency Lion Travel now also offers a Pokémon bus tour with a price tag of NT$99 (US$3). This 4-hour Lion Travel bus tour takes players to popular attractions such as the 228 Peace Memorial Park and Tamsui Old Street. An experienced Pokémon trainer will be on the bus to share his tips and tricks on playing the game. The tour makes use of Lure Modules at every stop to attract more Pokémon.

 

“Cruises take players around the lake, allowing them to capture those water-loving Pokémon that cannot be found on land.”
 

Pokémon Go’s arrival in Taiwan has already proven to be good for land-based businesses, but it has also been profitable for on-water businesses. Inspired by the idea of catching water-based Pokémon, boat operators at Taiwan’s tourist attraction Sun Moon Lake are now offering Pokémon-themed cruises. These cruises take players around the lake, allowing them to capture those water-loving Pokémon that cannot be found on land. There has also been news of families and groups of friends chartering boats just to catch Pokémon.

The Pokémon craze has resulted in many Pokémon-related promotional offers in Taiwan. As one Weibo netizen recently wrote: “It has only been 5 days since Pokémon Go was released in Taiwan, and already shops on every street are offering discounts for Pokémon Go players!”

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One remarkable offer is one that is currently being offered by a Taiwanese funeral home. In Taichung, a funeral home put out a billboard ad with a message that reads: “13% off on services for deaths caused by Pokémon Go related accidents.” Fortunately, nobody has claimed the offer yet.

By Chi Wen, edited by Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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Chi Wen is a freelance translator and writer who lives in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Besides translating and writing, he also teaches English as a Second Language to high school students. Chi is a self-proclaimed geek with a love for video games.

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Surprise Attack: CCTV6 Unexpectedly Airs Anti-American Movies as China-US Trade War Intensifies

“They have no new anti-American films, so they’re showing us the old ones instead.”

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CCTV 6, the movie channel of China’s main state television broadcaster, has gone trending on Chinese social media today for changing its schedule and playing three anti-American movies for three days in a row.

Some suggest the selection for the movies is no coincidence, and that it’s sending out a clear anti-US message while the trade war is heating up.

The three movies are the Korean war movies Heroic Sons and Daughters (英雄儿女, 1964), Battle on Shangganling Mountain (上甘岭, 1954), and Surprise Attack (奇袭, 1960), airing from May 17-19 during prime time at 20:15.

Ongoing trade tensions between China and the United States heightened when Trump raised an existing 10 percent tax on many Chinese imports to 25 percent earlier this month. Chinese authorities responded by raising taxes on many American imports.

Over the past week, anti-American propaganda has intensified in Chinese state media, with the slogan “Wanna talk? Let’s talk. Wanna fight? Let’s do it. Wanna bully us? Dream on!“* (“谈,可以!打,奉陪!欺,妄想!”) going viral on Chinese social media.

The movies broadcasted by CCTV these days are so-called “Resist America, Help North Korea” movies (“抗美援朝影片”).

The ‘Resist the USA, Help North Korea’ (or: “Resist American Aggression and Aid North Korea”) was a propaganda slogan launched in October 1950 during the Korean War (1950-1953). China came to the assistance of North Korea after the war with the South had broken out in June that year and the UN forces intervened in September.

The government, led by Mao Zedong, sent troops to fight in the war. Mao’s own son, Mao Anying, was killed in action by an air strike a month after the start of this 3-year war against US aggression in support of North Korea. The war ended with the armistice of July 1953.

“That’s not a target, it’s the enemy: American Imperialism.” Political poster from 1950 (http://military.china.com/).

“Resist USA, Aid North Korea” propaganda poster抗美援朝.

All three movies aired on CCTV6 are set during the “War to Resist US Aggression and Aid Korea.”

Battle on Shangganling Mountain focuses on a group of Chinese People’s Volunteer Army soldiers who are holding Triangle Hill for several days against US forces.

Heroic Sons and Daughters tells the story of a political commissar in China’s volunteer army who finds his missing daughter on the Korean battlefield.

Surprise Attack revolves around the mission of the Chinese army to blow up the strategic Kangping Bridge, cutting off supplies to the American army and allowing the Chinese to engage in a full attack.

On Chinese social media, the unexpected decision of the CCTV to change its original schedule and to air the three historical films has become a much-discussed topic, with many people praising CCTV6 for showing these movies.

The issue was also widely reported on by Chinese media, from Sohu News to Global Times, which called the broadcast programming itself a “Surprise Attack.”

Not all netizens praise the initiative, however, with some commenting: “It seems that there are no new anti-American TV series or movies now, so they’ve come up with these old films to brainwash us.” Others said: “This kind of brainwashing is not useful.”

Many Weibo users, however, just enjoy seeing classic movies, saying “They don’t make movies like this anymore,” and “It’s good for the younger generation to also see these classics.”

If you’re reading this article on Saturday night China Central Time, you’re still in time to watch the airing of Battle on Shangganling Mountain on CCTV6 here.

Update 18th May CST: It seems that a fourth movie has been added to the series now. This might just become the CCTV6 Anti-American movies month! We’ll keep you updated.

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

*Translation suggested by @kaiserkuo.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Arts & Entertainment

The Lawyers Are Here: Chinese State Media Popularize ‘Rule of Law’

The Chinese TV show ‘The Lawyers are Here’ is “helping the people through the rule of law.”

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The Lawyers are Here (律师来了) is a weekly television program by state broadcaster CCTV that focuses on the legal struggles of ordinary Chinese citizens. The program educates through entertainment, and in doing so, propagates core socialist values such as equality, justice, and rule of law.

You just bought a new house when you discover its locks have been changed and you’re denied access. Together with five colleagues, you’ve been working in a factory when your boss suddenly lays you off without explanation. You won a lawsuit but still have not received the settled compensation. What to do? What kind of rights do you have as a Chinese citizen?

These kinds of legal cases are at the center of a weekly Chinese TV show called The Lawyers Are Here (律师来了), which was first aired on CCTV’s Legal Channel in 2017 as a follow-up to the 2016 I am a Barrister (我是大律师).

The Lawyers Are Here introduces a different legal issue every week. The problems range from the aforementioned examples to people wanting custody over their child or a former patient fighting a negligent hospital for financial compensation.

Besides the TV host (Cao Xuanyi 曹煊一) and the people involved in the case, every 45-minute episode features various topic experts and four lawyers who offer their views and advice on the matter.

Each show begins with a short video explaining the story behind the case, after which the participants analyze the different legal aspects. One person provides further clarification at certain moments throughout the show by reading from Chinese legal texts.

Once everybody has a clear picture of the current situation, the show enters its most thrilling stage. Background music heightens the tension as the lawyers have to answer the most crucial question of the night: are they willing to take this case? It is then up to the party involved in the case to choose the lawyer they trust the most to win their case.

The Lawyers Are Here describes itself as “China’s first legal media public service platform.” It does not only offer help to the common people on the show who are caught up in legal issues, but it also informs viewers on how to handle certain problems, and educates people on China’s legal system.

One 2018 episode featured a female nurse from Beijing who was seeking help in getting divorced from her abusive husband. The woman only wanted a divorce if she could get full custody over her 15-month-old son. The lawyers on the show explained that if the woman could prove she suffered from abuse at the hands of her husband, she had a stronger case in getting full custody.

The woman, visibly upset, tells that she has never reported the abuse to the police, but that she did go to the hospital and took photos of her injuries. Although the lawyers on the show predicted that the pictures and hospital records would be sufficient evidence for the court, they also strongly advised all viewers to always report these incidents to the police.

Legal advice on the show goes beyond family-related issues. In another episode, a victim of a fraudulent car dealer was reprimanded by the lawyers for signing a contract before thoroughly reading it. “Never sign a contract before reading it completely”, the show warned, also telling viewers never to be pressured into signing a contract.

The Lawyers Are Here also often shows how the people featured on the show receive help from their lawyer after filming, and how a dispute is finally settled in court.

 

Popularizing Rule of Law

 

Every episode of The Lawyers Are Here starts with the slogan “The law is the rule, help is the intention” or “Helping the people through the rule of law” (“法为绳墨, 助为初心”).

By clearly reinforcing the message of ‘live by the law and justice will prevail,’ The Lawyers Are Here serves as a media tool to propagate the idea of ‘Governing China with Rule of Law,’ which is emphasized by the Party leadership.

“Rule of law” is one of the 14 principles of ‘Xi Jinping Thought’ and one of the 12 Core Socialist Values. This idea is clearly promoted throughout the show, along with other socialist values such as equality, justice, and integrity.

Image via 博谈网.

An important aspect of promoting the idea of a nation that is ruled by law is educating people on Chinese law, and, perhaps more importantly, creating more trust in legal institutions among the people.

Besides news media and other forms of propaganda, TV shows such as The Lawyers Are Here are effective tools for doing so. Not only does it present legal cases in a popular and modern way, even adding a game factor to it, it also personalizes it by letting the people tell their emotional stories – sometimes even moving the TV host to tears – and showing that the law can resolve complex family or business problems in an efficient matter.

On social media, people compliment the CCTV show for “bringing justice to ordinary people” and “standing up for the weak.”

“I hope we can have more programs such as these,” one Weibo commenter writes.

The Lawyers are Here is broadcasted every Saturday on 18:00 at CCTV12.

By Gabi Verberg, Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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