The Yico Zeng Controversy: Chinese Singer Falls from Grace after Beijing Airport Misconduct

Chinese singer Yico Zeng seems to have fallen out of favor with Chinese netizens after refusing to comply with Beijing airport security rules and exposing the personal details of an officer on her Weibo account.

Just a month ago, Weibo blew up when the inluential Chinese entertainer Roy Wang, a participant of the popular reality show I’m CZR (我是唱作人), was caught smoking inside a Beijing restaurant.

Now, another participant of the I’m CZR entertainment show has triggered major controversy for breaking the rules in multiple ways. Yico Zeng (曾轶可) was occupying the hot charts of Weibo earlier this week for causing a scene at Beijing Airport and for posting personal details of airport security staff.

 

The Weibo Post that Backfired

 

Noteworthy enough, it was Yico Zeng herself who brought the issue to the public’s attention. On June 17, the 29-year-old celebrity published a post on her social media account account (1.4 million followers) in which she criticized the way she had been handled at the Immigration Inspection at Beijing Airport.

The former talent show singer described her unpleasant run-in with an airport officer who had ordered her to take off her cap at the passport checkpoint. In that post and in a later one, Zeng accused the officer of wrongfully detaining her in a separate room, and posted a series of pictures of the officer’s badge, exposing his personal information for all of her followers to see.

Zeng’s posts – which have since been deleted – drew major criticism on Weibo, followed by an official statement issued by the Beijing Immigration Inspection (@北京边检) on June 19. According to that statement, soon receiving over 20,000 shares, Zeng had refused to take off her cap for identification when using the inspection E-channel and thus failed to pass the tunnel.

Beijing Immigration Inspection also condemned the Chinese singer for refusing a manual check, using offensive language, and exposing the officer’s personal information on social media.

The Weibo account of China’s Communist Youth League also reposted the statement, expressing their “strong support” for law-enforcement and for law-abiding citizens.

Zeng soon posted an apology on Weibo over her “inappropriate words and behavior.” She wrote: “I cannot believe that I was so emotional at that moment. I apologize to all, and I’d like to personally apologize to the officer if I have the chance.”

The post received more than 100,000 comments within a day after it was posted, but many commenters rejected Zeng’s apologies, suggesting the celebrity only said sorry because of public pressure.

 

Fallen out of Favor

 

The airport incident has not been without consequence for Yico Zeng. Since the controversy, the popular Strawberry Festival has canceled Zeng’s upcoming show, and it is reported that more of her work for the upcoming time, including her participation in the reality show I’m CZR, will be postponed or called off indefinitely.

Shanghaiist reports that Zeng could face up to ten days of detention and a fine of up to 500 yuan if she is convicted of resisting the officer.

An article published by Sina News on June 24 argued that Zeng had not just done one thing wrong, but had actually committed three wrongdoings: she ignored laws and regulations, she breached the privacy of others, and used her celebrity status to demand certain privileges.

Zeng is not the first celebrity to fall from grace after breaking the law. One of the most noteworthy years regarding Chinese celebrity scandals is probably 2014 when various singers and actors triggered controversy and received legal punishment for possession of drugs, illegal gambling, or visiting prostitutes.

Although Zeng is condemned by the majority of commenters on social media, there are still some loyal fans who are actively participating in the Yico Zeng ‘supertopic’ Weibo community, hoping for a quick comeback of the singer.

Other commenters, however, are hoping that the star will receive legal punishment instead.

“We’re all equal before the law,” various people write on Weibo.

By Wendy Huang, Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com