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Chinese High-Altitude Stunt Performer Confirmed Dead after Fall off Building

The death-defying stunts of China’s self-proclaimed “first extreme heights challenger in the country” ended with a fatal fall.

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The death of “China’s first extreme height challenger” Wu Yongning has become a trending topic on Weibo over the past two days. Some blame his fans for his death.

Over the past two days, the death of a Chinese high-altitude stunt performer has become a major topic of discussion on Chinese social media. Rumors about the death of the young man, named Wu Yongning (吴咏宁), started when he had not updated his Weibo account (@极限-咏宁, ±38000 fans) since November 8. He then posted a video of him hanging on the rooftop of a high building in Changsha. That video has been viewed nearly 9 million times.

On Friday, the performer’s girlfriend posted on her Weibo: “It is December 8 today; a month since you left this world.” Chinese media reported today that Wu Yongning died after a slip off a 62-storey skyscraper during one his high-altitude challenges. One Weibo report about his death received around 37000 comments on Saturday and over 17000 shares.

Many commenters criticize Wu, even after his death, for “not taking life seriously.” Some also attack his fans for watching and liking his videos which encouraged him to continue stunting – ultimately leading to his death.

“Since seeing his first video, I knew the chances of him dying were high. I hope nobody will do the same,” one netizen wrote.

Wu Yongning was born in 1991 in Changsha, Hunan. He called himself “China’s first extreme height challenger” (“国内极限高空运动挑战第一人”) since he regularly began posting videos of his stunts in early 2017. Similar kinds of death-defying stunts have become more popular across the world over recent years.

When posting his final video on Weibo on November 8, Wu did warn his fans: “This is dangerous, please do not imitate me.”

Despite all criticism, there are also many people on Weibo who hope Wu will “rest in peace.” One commenter says: “I hope you can continue to do what you love to do up there in heaven.”

– By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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25 Comments

25 Comments

  1. N Waff

    December 15, 2017 at 11:30 am

    Translation
    Wu Yongning = stupid

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China Marketing & Advertising

China’s Peppa Pig Movie Promo Craze: Understanding the Video and the Trend Behind It

Why Peppa is breaking the Chinese internet.

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The Peppa Pig movie promo is breaking the Chinese internet right now. Our latest Weivlog explains the video, its social context, and its background.

China’s Peppa Pig movie promo video might already be one of Weibo’s biggest trending topics of the year.

To know more about this video and its background, check out our full latest video featured here, explaining the trend in full detail – the original video lacks English subs, so we explain the video from A-Z there.

Check it out, and please subscribe to our YouTube channel if you’d like to see more explanations of Chinese trends through video.

By Manya Koetse 

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Marketing & Advertising

When Hotpot Gets Really Hot: Haidilao Customers Shocked by Steamy TV

Haidilao is taking its customer service to a whole new level.

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First published .

Customers dining at a Haidilao hotpot restaurant in Wuhan on January 5th were shocked when the big television screen in the restaurant, usually used for showing Haidilao ads, suddenly showed an X-rated film.

Haidilao is China’s most famous hotpot chain, and is usually known for its excellent service. On busy nights, people stand in line for hours at the Haidilao restaurants, that are always packed full of people enjoying the good food and outstanding hospitality.

The incident, that happened on Saturday afternoon at the restaurant’s Great Ocean mall location, has now made its rounds on Chinese social media after one Haidilao customer shared photos of the embarrassing moment on Weibo. At time of writing, the hashtag “Haidilao TV shows vulgar scene” (#海底捞电视播不雅画面#) has received more than 240 million views.

Waiters at the restaurant were fast to turn off the television. According to some online reports, a reporter visited the restaurant a few hours after the incident happened, and confirmed the television was still turned off at night.

On Sunday, January 6, Haidilao issued a statement in which the restaurant apologized to the customers for the “vulgar content” that was displayed on the television, and that police are investigating the case. Online pornography is banned in China, and spreading X-rated films is illegal.

It is yet unsure how the film ended up on the restaurant’s screen, and whether it was a Haidilao employee who was watching the video and then made a mistake, or that a customer was using IR or Bluetooth on their smartphone and (purposely) connected it to their screen.

The incident has provoked hilarity on social media, where some netizens suggest that the X-rated film perhaps was a “customer demand” and that “Haidilao’s service is beyond expectations,” or that people were “eating and getting hard.”

The incident, as of now, does not seem to negatively affect people’s love for the Haidilao brand. “Please don’t close it down, I still want to eat hotpot,” some netizens comment, while others simply state: “Haidilao, I’m coming!”

(PS Want to know more about steamy hotpots? Check out What’s on Weibo’s sister site Hotpot Ambassador!)

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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