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China Health & Science

‘Random’, ‘Shocking’, ‘Pointless’: Female Military Doctor Stabbed to Death in Tianjin Hospital

Another random outburst of violence in a Chinese hospital has shocked Weibo commenters.

Chauncey Jung

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A 47-year-old doctor from Tianjin died after a random knife attack in an outpatient clinic. Over recent years, more and more outbursts of violence against doctors make headlines in China.

The fatal stabbing of a female military doctor in Tianjin on July 12th has shocked Chinese netizens.

The Tianjin Affiliated Hospital of The Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces, where the stabbing took place, issued a statement on Weibo about the incident (image below), saying that the 47-year-old Zhao Junyan (赵军艳) was violently attacked by three people at the outpatient clinic on Thursday morning.

Zhao died of her injuries later that day. The main suspect and two other suspects were apprehended by the police at the scene of the crime.

One witness told reporters at We Video that the attackers did not try to run away after the stabbing: “The [main] suspect was about 50 years old. He did not run away, perhaps he knew that would be futile. He did not say anything after stabbing the doctor. We called the police and had him arrested.”

The same witness also suggests that the main suspect was the husband of a patient at the clinic, although Sina News reports that it did not concern one of Zhao’s own patients.

Another person who was there when it happened told Chinese media: “When the suspect was arrested, he said that his target was not Dr. Zhao, but another doctor. Dr. Zhao was just unlucky to be the victim.”

Violence against Chinese Medical Staff

Zhao’s killing is one of many of such incidents over previous years; violence has become a more and more common occurrence in Chinese hospitals, where the so-called yinao phenomenon (医闹, ‘medical disturbance’) is a growing problem. Yinao is the organized disturbance and violence in hospitals against medical workers.

In 2012, another female doctor was axed to death by a patient in Tianjin; in 2013, a patient in Wenling fatally stabbed his doctor after he was unhappy with the results of an operation. Just last year, a male doctor in Anhui province was stabbed to death by the father of one of his patients. The list of incidents goes on, and it is extensive.

In response to the recent incident, Weibo users collectively expressed their anger and concern in the comment sections; dozens of threads on the issue received thousands of responses on Weibo this week, with people calling the brutal attack “pointless” and “outrageous.”

“If this crime doesn’t receive the death penalty, our legal system is a joke,” a commenter by the name of ‘@33daysofsilence’ wrote.

Another user wrote: “Even if this was their doctor there’s no reason to hurt her. It is tragic to see that doctors end up in dangerous situations nowadays.”

“Wouldn’t let our kids become doctors”

“My husband is a doctor and I am a nurse. But we wouldn’t let our kids become doctors. If this [violence] keeps happening, nobody will be willing to work in the healthcare industry anymore,” a user named @Jinyueyao2008 wrote.

Many Chinese face major obstacles in getting access to the healthcare they need. Doctor-patient conflicts in China partly come from the high costs and long waiting times in Chinese hospitals and clinics, triggering frustration among patients. As conflicts become more violent and receive more media attention, more people are starting to perceive the professions of doctors or nurses as a potentially hazardous.

“It is difficult and expensive to see a doctor- this leads to more conflicts between doctors and patients,” a top commenter writes on Weibo.

“There was no reason for this at all, these people must be crazy. This society is becoming more and more scary,” another person wrote.

Meanwhile, the death of Zhao Junyan, who leaves behind a son and her husband, is mourned on Weibo. Posting virtual candles, many hope that Zhao can “rest in peace.”

By Chauncey Jung

This article has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Chauncey Jung is a China internet specialist who who previously worked for various Chinese internet companies in Beijing. Jung completed his BA and MA education in Canada (Univ. of Toronto & Queen's), and has a strong interest in Chinese trends, technology, economic developments and social issues.

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China Health & Science

Chinese Doctor Knocks Herself Out in Controversial Self-Experiment

Dr. Chen wanted to warn about the dangers of sevoflurane and other drugs.

Manya Koetse

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A female doctor has become a topic of discussion on Chinese social media for her self-experimentation with anesthesia.

Dr. Chen (陈大夫), a Nanjing doctor who works in the Obstetrics and Gynecology department, conducted the experiment in response to an ongoing discussion on whether or not a handkerchief dipped in inhalation anesthetics could cause immediate unconsciousness (“一捂就晕”).

The discussion was triggered by news of the death of a 23-year-old woman from Foshan, Guangdong Province, on February 8. The recent college graduate was found in a hotel room and it was later ruled that the cause of death was acute respiratory failure due to sevoflurane toxicity. The victim’s company supervisor, a 39-year-old man named Peng, is now suspected of fatally sedating and raping the young woman.

The case led to speculation among netizens whether or not sevoflurane could have knocked out the woman in seconds. There have been ongoing debates on the effects of general anesthetics used to sedate unsuspected victims, with some specialists arguing that it is not so easy to make someone slip into unconsciousness within a matter of seconds – saying it would take much longer than and only if an unusually high dosage is used.

Dr. Chen posted on February 10 that she was certain that it is possible for certain inhalation anesthetics to immediately make someone pass out, but her claim was refuted by others. The popular Weibo blogger Jiangning Popo (@江宁婆婆), a police officer, was one of the persons involved in the discussion claiming Chen was wrong.

Dr. Chen is active on Weibo under the handle @妇产科的陈大夫, and with over two million followers on her account, she is somewhat of a ‘celebrity’ doctor.

Instead of spending time arguing back and forth on the internet, Dr. Chen decided to put the issue to the test herself with an unopened bottle of sevoflurane that she had previously purchased for the planned sterilization of her dog. The sevoflurane had already passed its expiry date.

On February 16, Dr. Chen then asked someone else to film her doing the self-experiment and she posted the video on Weibo, in which she inhaled sevoflurane on a cloth. The doctor soon passed out in the video, which has since been deleted.

The experiment in the video lasts 64 seconds, and shows Chen:

– 00:01-00:06 Opening the bottle of sevoflurane
– 00:07-00:12 Preparing a cloth
– 00:13-00:23 Putting the sevoflurane on the cloth
– 00:23-00:26 Closing the cap of the bottle
– 00:27-00:28 Putting the cloth on her mouth and nose
– 00:29-01:33 = the time frame of losing consciousness (with first symptoms starting at 0:44) to going limp and falling on the floor (1:20) and being completely unconscious (1:21-1:33).

Dr. Chen’s experiment immediately sparked controversy after she posted the video on social media.

Although sevoflurane is a prescription drug and a controlled substance, it is also sold online as a type of drug. According to The Paper, the number of rape cases in China facilitated by drugs have risen over the past three years, with many ‘date rape drugs’ being sold and bought over the internet.

With sevoflurane being a controlled substance, Dr. Chen’s video triggered discussions on whether or not she was actually involving in a criminal act by doing the self-experiment. She also received criticism from within the medical community that she used this medication outside of the hospital environment.

Dr. Chen soon deleted the video herself and then called the police to personally explain and apologize for the incident, with the news soon going viral (#女医生拿自己做实验后报警并致歉#, 270 million views).

But despite the controversy, the doctor still defends her actions to some extend. Although Chen stated on February 17 that her self-experiment was “not right,” dangerous, and should never be imitated by anyone, she later also explained on her Weibo page that she thinks sevoflurane as a prescription drug is too easy to get your hands on and that the existing laws to prevent people from buying it are too weak.

The doctor has succeeded in raising public awareness on the dangers of these kinds of drugs. She also reminds both women and men never to leave their drink unattended, as the dangers of someone slipping something in your drink are real and the consequences can be grave.

As the incident has gone trending on Chinese social media, many commenters praise Dr. Chen for her experiment, while others also praise her for being transparent and admitting her mistakes.

 
By Manya Koetse
with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Health & Science

Applying China’s New Civil Code, Shanghai Court Annuls Marriage after Husband Hides HIV-positive Status from Wife

The court case triggered discussions on the need for premarital health checks.

Manya Koetse

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Jiang is HIV-positive but did not mention his status to his partner before getting married. Under China’s new civil code, the marriage is now annulled.

On January 4, a Shanghai court applied the new rules of China’s Civil Code for the first time to annul a marriage.

The Civil Code of the People’s Republic of China was adopted by the third session of the 13th National People’s Congress in May of last year and is effective since January 1st 2021. Some experts within China call the law a “milestone legislation” that will better protect people’s civil rights.

On Monday, January 4, a landmark court case in which the new civil code was applied for the first time in Shanghai went trending on Chinese social media.

The case involves a married couple of which the husband had failed to inform his wife that he was HIV positive before getting married.

In June of 2020, Mr. Jiang and Ms. Li got married after Li became pregnant. Afterward, Jiang confessed that he had been HIV-positive for multiple years, and was taking medication to control his disease.

Jiang alleged that, due to his medication, there was effectively no risk of transmitting HIV to his partner. But Li, who did not contract HIV, could not accept the situation and decided to terminate her pregnancy and applied for a marriage annulment.

Under the new civil code, annulment of marriage is possible when a partner who is “seriously ill” – which now includes HIV/AIDS – fails to inform their fiance of their condition before getting married.

Since Jiang had not informed his wife of his condition before tying the knot, the Shanghai Minhang Court ruled in Li’s favor and annulled the marriage.

On Weibo, the case has attracted a lot of attention, with one hashtag about the case (#男方婚前患艾滋未告知婚姻关系被撤销#) attracting 690 million views on Monday.

The news item also led to another hashtag gaining many views: “The Need for Premarital Medical Examination” (#婚前体检的必要性#) had 200 million views on its hashtag page on Monday.

One popular relationship blogger (@感情感分析异地恋) argues that the Shanghai court case shows the importance of couples getting a medical examination before getting married: “It’s not to discriminate against those who are HIV positive or who are suffering from other illnesses, but it’s about informing your partner about these things before getting married.”

Premarital health checks were previously compulsory in China, but these examinations are no longer required since 2003. Many couples do still go for premarital health checkups. According to Xinhua, over 61% of Chinese couples had a medical examination before getting married in 2018.

Although the application of China’s new civil code is generally praised by Weibo users in this case, it has previously also received a lot of negative attention. The new law also introduced a mandatory 30-day “cooling off” period for couples seeking divorce.

This “cooling off” period is seen as harmful to those who are suffering abuse within marriage and already have difficulties in leaving their abusive partner. The case of Lamu, a Tibetan vlogger who died after her husband set her on fire, also led to more online discussions of the “cooling off” period and how it makes women more vulnerable within their marriage.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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