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China Memes & Viral

Gay Renmin University Student Publicly Announces Love for Friend

One young man recently attracted a crowd of students at Renmin University when he publicly announced his love for another young man. As pictures of the scene were shared on Weibo, the two lovebirds drew mixed reactions.

Manya Koetse

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One young man recently attracted a crowd of students at Renmin University when he publicly announced his love for another young man. As pictures of the scene were shared on Weibo, the two lovebirds drew mixed reactions.

On the evening of May 20, a Beijing Renmin University student publicly announced his love for another young man and kissed him in the middle of the campus area. A large group of students watching the scene responded with enthusiasm when the Renmin student told his friend: “I will be with you, not to play basketball, but to kiss you.”

behind view

Pictures of the scene were shared on Sina Weibo over the past two days. But not all comments were as warm as those of the Renmin crowd. “It’s disgusting,” some netizens wrote. “Talking about discriminating gay people,” one person wrote: “I cannot help it – won’t mankind perish if everyone’s gay? In my opinion, gay people should go and see a psychiatrist.”

Another person says: “They are a disgrace to the university and when their parents see this, they’ll faint.”

sideview

But many people also send the new couple their blessings: “Love goes beyond gender, bless you!” Some people also worry what the consequences of this public event might be for the two young men: “I wonder how Renmin University will respond to this. If these students get expelled, I would really lose hope in Chinese universities.”

top view

Although public acceptance of homosexuals has been slowly growing in Chinese society, gay emancipation has also seen many setbacks throughout the years. Last March, the Chinese government banned depictions of gay people on television as part of a cultural crackdown on “vulgar” or “unhealthy” content. The very popular web series ‘Addicted’ (上瘾) about a college gay romance was taken offline the previous month. However, at the same time, mainland China’s first gay movie was approved for cinemas.

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There are also people who are happy for the two men for other reasons. As one netizen comments: “I’m happy, because this leaves two more single women for me.”

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Celebs

Ai Fukuhara’s Rumored Divorce: Weibo Users Show Support to ‘China’s Most Favorite Japanese Girl’

Weibo’s love for Ai Fukuhara is strong. “How could anyone make Little Ai sad?”

Wendy Huang

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When the Japanese table tennis star Ai Fukuhara (福原爱) was tying the knot back in 2016, all of Weibo wanted to know how the marriage to Taiwanese table tennis player Chiang Hung-Chieh (江宏傑), a fellow Olympian, would work out. Now that rumors of Fukuhara getting divorced have begun to appear on Chinese social media, the popular Japanese athlete is once again the topic of the day.

The rumor of Fukuhara’s divorce went trending on Weibo after two reports about her were published on the same day. On March 3, Japanese site News Post Seven reported that Ai Fukuhara and an unnamed man stayed overnight in a hotel in Japan’s Yokohama City, hinting that she was having an affair.

Some of the photos posted by https://www.news-postseven.com/.

Following this report, Shukan Bunshun, another Japanese media site, published a report with sources saying that Ai Fukuhara has made up her mind to get a divorce as she has allegedly is suffering from verbal abuse by her husband, Chiang Hung-Chieh.

Ai Fukuhara then responded to the report of News Post Seven, admitting that she had a ‘meeting’ with “one of her supportive friends”, but she emphasized that the two were staying overnight in different rooms. When asked if the separation from her husband is a result of verbal abuse, she did not respond to the question, but she did say that a potential divorce is a decision that needs to be taken as a couple.

Fukuhara and her husband in happier days.

After Shukan Bunshun’s article spread online, many Weibo users in China expressed their sympathy and support for Fukuhara, whom they had seen growing up since she was a young girl. Fukuhara began playing table tennis at the age of 3, and started her professional career at the age of 10.

One of the reasons why the Japanese Ai Fukuhara is so popular in China is her fluent Chinese. She was trained in the north-eastern part of China since she was a teenager and acquired the local accent. Fukuhara is often called ‘Ai Jiang’ by Chinese fans, which equals the Japanese endearing ‘Ai Chan’ (“Little Ai”). Fukuhara is also active on Weibo (@福原愛AiFukuhara), where she has over 5,1 million fans.

 

“Ai Fukuhara is always right no matter what she has done”

 

On Weibo, the hashtag “[People on] My Timeline Have All Agreed on One Thing” (#首页都在一件事上达成了一致#) went to the top search lists after a user published a post saying:

People I follow have been fighting against each other on various topics every day, but today, whether it is a woman or a man, a sweet Douhua supporter or a salty Douhua supporter, a left-winger or a right-winger, a liberal, a conservative or a centrist, all have reached an agreement on one thing – that Ai Fukuhara is always right no matter what she has done.”

In the comment area of this post, a comment that received the most likes also expressed full support for her: “Even if Ai Jiang (爱酱) is having an affair, it must be because her husband has done something bad to her.”

More support for Fukuhara was flooding in under a hashtag “How Could Anyone Make Ai Jiang Sad”(#怎么会有人舍得让爱酱难过#). Weibo users shared various videos of Ai Fukuhara, including documentary videos about her life-long table tennis career and her interviews on variety shows in China and Japan.

While praising her for her cuteness and hard work, Weibo users also expressed their dissatisfaction with her husband because of Shukan Bunshun’s report. The hashtag has received more than 220 million views so far.

Late on March 4, Ai Fukuhara issued a hand-written statement to address the ongoing rumors about her alleged affair. In the letter, Fukuhara apologizes for “the concerns and troubles brought about” by her own “reckless behavior.”

A handwritten statement by Fukuhara (in Japanese).

Fukuhara also clarified her overnight stay with a male friend, saying it was a respected friend who helped her in starting a company. The two had indeed taken a break from work to relax, Fukuhara emphasized that they did not share a room. She further added that together with her husband, they will deal with their problems together and come up with the best solution for their child. Fukuhara and Chiang Hung-chieh have one daughter, who is now three years old.

At time of writing, the hashtag “Ai Fukuhara’s Apology Statement” (#福原爱道歉声明#) has reached over 570 million views on Weibo.

 

By Wendy Huang

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©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Memes & Viral

“Hi, Mom!” Box Office Hit Sparks ‘When My Mum Was Younger’ Trend on Weibo

The touching Chinese hit movie “Hi, Mom” has sparked an emotional trend on Weibo.

Manya Koetse

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The movie Hi, Mom is all the rage in China, where social media is flooding with hashtags, photos, and texts celebrating moms and the bond between mothers and daughters. One big discussion is focused on all the things daughters would tell their younger moms: “Please don’t marry dad.”

If you could travel back in time and meet your mum before she had you, what would you say to her? What would you do?

This question is the idea behind Hi, Mom (Chinese title Hi, Li Huanying 你好,李焕英), the box office favorite in China this Spring Festival. The movie is directed by Jia Ling (贾玲), who also plays the female protagonist. For comedian Jia Ling, who is mostly known for her sketches during the Spring Festival Gala, this movie is her directorial debut.

Hi, Mom tells the story of Jia Xiaoling (Jia Ling) who is devastated when her mother Li Huanying has a serious accident one day. Jia is especially grief-stricken because she feels she has not become the daughter she wanted to be for her mother. When she finds herself transported back in time to the year 1981, she meets her young mother before she was her mum, and becomes her friend in the hopes of making her happy and change her life for the better.

From the movie “Hi, Mom”

Li Huanying is also the name of Jia Ling’s own mother, who passed away when Jia was just 19 years old. Jia Ling reportedly did not make the movie because she wanted to be a director, but because she wanted to tell her mother’s story.

The film has become super popular since its debut on February 12 and raked in 2.6 billion yuan (over $400 million) within five days. On day five alone, the movie earned $90 million.

The movie has sparked various trends on Chinese social media. One of them is an online ‘challenge’ for daughters to post pictures of mothers when they were young. The hashtag “Photo of My Mother When She Was Young” (#妈妈年轻时的照片#) received 120 million views on Weibo by Wednesday. Another hashtag used for this ‘challenge’ is “This is My Li Huanying” (#这是我的李焕英#). The hashtags have motivated thousands of netizens to post photos of their mother before she became a mom.

The trend has not just sparked an online movement to celebrate and appreciate mothers – it also offers an intimate glance into the lives of Chinese older women and shows just how different the times were when they were young. This also gave many daughters a new appreciation of their mothers.

“I used to have many wishes,” one female Weibo user wrote: “But now I just hope to make my mum happy.” Others praised their mother’s beauty (“My mum is so pretty!”) and said that they are proud to look like their mom, although some also complained that they had not inherited their mother’s looks.

The trend has also provided an opportunity for a moment of self-reflection for some. Seeing the unedited photos of their younger mothers, some called on female web users to stop losing themselves in ‘beautifying’ photo apps that alter their facial features, saying they will not have normal photos of themselves in the future that show their true (and unedited) natural beauty.

 

“Don’t marry dad, don’t believe his sweet talk.”

 

There is also another hashtag trending in light of Hi, Mum. It is “If You Could Go Back to Before Your Mum Married” (#如果穿越回妈妈结婚前#) and started with one popular fashion influencer (@一扣酥) asking her followers what they would want to tell her.

“Don’t marry dad. Don’t believe his sweet talk,” one person replied, with many others also writing that they would want to tell their younger mom not to marry their fathers: “I would tell her to look for someone who loves her, and not for someone she loves,” one person responded.

“Please leave dad,” another Weibo user writes, adding that her father drank too much and would hit her mother.

“Don’t feel like you need to marry because you’re older,” another daughter writes: “Don’t get into a ‘lightning wedding’ and don’t care so much about what other people say.”

“Live for yourself for once,” a blogger named ‘Zhi Zhi El’ wrote, with another young woman named Yumiko writing: “Don’t close your bookshop, be independent and confident, don’t listen to everything dad says, and don’t become a housewife.”

But there are also those who are happy with the way things turned out: “Mum! Marry dad! He’s good!”

In the end, most commenters just want one thing. As this Weibo user (@·__弑天) writes: “Mum, I just hope you have a happy life.”

 
By Manya Koetse
with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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