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The Lianghui “Question-Asking Bitch” Incident: Eye-Rolling Journalist Goes Viral on Weibo

One moment during a media conference of China’s Two Sessions sparked the “Question-Asking Bitch” (提问婊) controversy and is generating dozens of memes.

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A remarkable moment during a media conference of the 13th National People’s Congress has ignited a social media storm. On the morning of March 13, a female journalist attracted the attention of Chinese netizens when she disapprovingly glanced at the woman next to her posing a question, and then rolled her eyes.

The incident sparked online discussions and a ‘human flesh search‘ into the matter, with people wondering who the two female journalists are and what the story behind the moment is.

See video below:

The blue dress journalist named Liang Xiangyi (梁相宜) works for the Shanghai-based financial media outlet Yicai.com (第一财经), whereas the reporter in red (Zhang Huijun (张慧君) works for a US-based news media channel named AMTV (全美电视台).

The moment happened during the National People’s Congress press conference when journalists are expected to ask short and concise questions. When the AMTV reporter poses her question relating to China’s One Belt One Road initiative in a somewhat stylized and long-winding way, it apparently greatly annoys the Yicai reporter, who then cannot contain her contempt for her colleague.

In screenshots of an Yicai chat group later leaked online, one colleague told Liang Xiangyi that her eye-rolling moment was broadcasted live, to which she replied: “Because the woman next to me was being an idiot.”

The Yicai reporter that has become famous at once on Chinese social media for rolling her eyes at a “self-important” colleague.

Screenshots of a WeChat conversation between reporter Zhang Huijun and a friend also made it online, with Zhang commenting: “What the heck was she doing looking at me like that?!”

The scene made the term ‘Question-Asking Bitch’ (提问婊) emerge on Chinese social media to make fun of self-important women working in the media industry. It also launched the term ‘Lianghui Elegant Sister’ (两会气质姐), which is a nickname Zhang Huijun uses for herself on WeChat and Weibo.

 

“Today these two beautiful women are breaking the internet – red or blue, which one do you like more?”

 

Some people from Chinese media circles spoke negatively about both reporters in their Weibo posts. Guangzhou Daily staff member Dai Bin (@戴斌) commented: “This is a serious occasion, and people have to pay attention to the time they use asking a question – after all, it’s the National People’s Congress. As for the woman who rolls her eyes, perhaps she is forgetting that she is being filmed, and forgot about her manners. May this be a lesson for her.”

Other commenters are less earnest about the matter, saying: “Today, these two beautiful women are breaking the internet! The red beauty reporter is asking an intelligent question, and the blue beauty looks charmingly stupefied! Such a difference between red and blue, which one do you like more?”

The remarkable moment is a huge change from the usual proceedings during these type of happenings. China’s annual parliamentary sessions (lianghui 两会 ‘Two Meetings’) are a very serious political event that makes headlines every single day over the course of two weeks. Generally, nothing really exciting happens, making lianghui-related news quite dull and dry for many netizens.

The vivid eye-rolling scene brings a personal and saucy touch to the otherwise unemotional occasions, making the story an instant viral phenomenon that generated dozens of memes today.

Durex meme: advertising the red as hot and sexy, the blue as being dynamic.

Shirts for sale on Taobao.

Made-in-China: Red and Blue.

The Eye-Rolling Woman in Blue Meme

The thug life meme.

People are even acting out the scene and posting videos of it:

While “eye-rolling” (翻白眼) became one of the keywords of the day on Chinese social media, the name of blue-dress reporter Liang Xiangyi had become one of the most censored words by Tuesday night (Beijing time).

For many netizens, the incident was also a reason to further investigate the media channel red-dress reporter Zhang Huijun works for. American Multimedia Television USA (AMTV) describes on its website that it has a 5.6 million household reach and 18 million potential viewers in California, while some on Weibo point out that its viewer ratings and online fans seem to be quite low.

They question Zhang’s apparent status as a “foreign journalist.” “She pretends to come from outside, but she is actually an insider,” some Weibo users write.

But for the majority of netizens, the incident is just a juicy detail of an otherwise monotonous event. As the trend has gone beyond viral, some social media users now say that today can officially be called a Weibo’s “roll your eyes” day.

UPDATE: Check our latest vlog on this incident below for an overview and its aftermath:

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Stories that are authored by the What's on Weibo Team are the stories that multiple authors contributed to. Please check the names at the end of the articles to see who the authors are.

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75 Comments

75 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Maaz Kalim

    March 14, 2018 at 6:12 am

    Technically, she ain’t “her colleague” as both of them work for entirely different media outlets.

    ‘Fraternal-sibling’ could be a more appropriate term.

  2. Avatar

    Geeb

    March 14, 2018 at 4:17 pm

    Hilarious! Love the Sas

  3. Avatar

    Jane Leggett

    March 15, 2018 at 1:43 am

    The dangers of living in a communist nation. Kiss her caboose goodbye. Freedom isn’t free. Complacent Chinese like being told how to live their lives I guess.

  4. Avatar

    MOQINGBO

    March 16, 2018 at 1:04 pm

    this says lot about the censorship in China now. i’m Chinese!

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China Media

Lost in Translation? UBS’s “Chinese Pig” Comment Stirs Controversy

“Chinese pig” – much ado about nothing or an insulting remark?

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A report by the UBS titled “Very Normal Inflation” caused controversy on Chinese social media on Thursday for containing the term “Chinese pig.”

The UBS, a Swiss multinational investment bank, published the article on consumer price inflation on June 12. The author, economist Paul Donovan, wrote: “Chinese consumer prices rose. This was mainly due to sick pigs. Does it matter? It matters if you are a Chinese pig.” The same text also appeared in a podcast on inflation in China.

Global Times (环球时报), a Chinese and English language media outlet under the People’s Daily newspaper, lashed out against the USB for its “insulting” and “discrimatory” remarks.

Many netizens agreed with the Global Times, and see the “Chinese pig” remark as a joke with a double meaning, assuming that Donovan was both talking about pigs in China, as well as insulting Chinese people.

Some people suggest that if Donovan did not intend to make a pun, he could have written “it matters if it is a pig in China” instead. They argue that UBS and Donovan could have avoided using the term to begin with, and intentionally wrote it up like this to insult Chinese people.

There are also social media users who come to Donovan’s defense. Author Deborah Chen (陈叠) writes on Weibo that she has known Paul for a long time and that she knows him as a straightforward and humorous commentator. “There is just one kind of translation for ‘pigs of China’ (中国的猪) and ‘Chinese pigs’ (中国猪) in English,” she says: “If you look at the context, you’ll see he’s talking about farm animals, and is not humiliating the people of the nation.”

On Weibo, multiple people called the reactions to the article “overly sensitive.”

A commenter nicknamed “Taxpayer0211809” wrote: “The way I understood is just that China’s consumer prices have inflated and that this is because of the swine fever. Is this thing important? It is important if you are a pig in China, or if you like eating pork, for the rest of the world there won’t be a big influence.”

Shortly after the controversy erupted, the UBS and Donovan sent their apologies, which were also published by Global Times:

But some Chinese web users did not accept those apologies. One Chinese author wrote there was nothing “innocent” about the remarks made.

The article in question has since been removed from the USB website.

 
Also read: Bulgari’s Noteworthy New China Marketing Campaign on a Happy ‘Jew’ Year of the Pig (Zhu)
 

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Photo by Fabian Blank on Unsplash

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Media

On 30th Anniversary of the Tiananmen Protests, Weibo Completely Cracks Down on the T-Word

The T-word is the taboo subject, but not for the State Office.

Manya Koetse

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Nobody can mention the T-word on social media this week, except for the State Council Information Office.

It is the time of the year that censorship on Chinese internet intensifies, and this year the date carries even more weight, as it marks the 30th anniversary of the Tiananmen student protests that started in April 1989 and ended with the violent crackdown on June 4th of that year.

What is noticeable about this anniversary on Weibo this year? Whereas certain combinations of ‘Tiananmen’ together with ‘protests’ or ‘6.4’ are always controlled on the social media site, searching for the Chinese word ‘Tiananmen’ now only shows a series of media posts about the celebration of the 70th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China (#庆祝新中国成立70年#).

The posts all come from Chinese (state) media outlets and mention the word ‘Tiananmen’ in it, with different state media outlets all posting the same post after the other starting from Monday night local time (e.g. one posts at 19:35, the other at 19:36, 19:45, etc).

The post is a press release from the State Council Information Office that for the first time now shares the official logo to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China.

The logo is the number “70” and the National Emblem of the People’s Republic of China, which contains in a red circle a representation of Tiananmen Gate and the five stars of the national flag. The word ‘Tiananmen’ is mentioned twice in the official state media Weibo posts.

Earlier on Monday, shortly before the press release, searching for ‘Tiananmen’ on Weibo showed that there were over 18 million posts containing the word ‘Tiananmen,’ but when clicking the results page, it suddenly showed that there were “no results” at all, suggesting a complete shutdown of searches for this term.

The hashtag page for #Tiananmen# (#天安门#) also comes up with zero results at time of writing.

For more on this subject, also read: Tiananmen Without the Tanks – The 1980s China Wants to Remember and the interview with musician Jeroen den Hengst, who was in Beijing in 1989.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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