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China Memes & Viral

Chinese Man Pays Three Years of Child Support for Photoshopped Baby

More than 60,000 yuan in child support costs, but the child was never there.

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The unfortunate story of an Hangzhou man who paid approximately 600,000 RMB ($89,150) in child support for a baby that turned out to be non-existent is making its way around Chinese social media.

A Chinese man who dated a woman for three months in 2016 was unpleasantly surprised when his ex-girlfriend claimed she was pregnant of his child.

The man, named Xiao Zhao (小赵), met Xiao Bei (小北) through a dating app. The two had a relationship for three months before breaking up. Xiao Bei later informed Xiao Zhao that she was pregnant by him.

Hangzhou-based Zhao paid the woman 20,000 RMB ($2970) to cover expenses for an abortion, but she later told him that the baby was not aborted and that she had given birth in her hometown in Jiangsu province.

In a time frame of three years, Xiao Zhao paid approximately 600,000 RMB ($89150) in child support, medical fees, and housing costs. During this time, Xiao Bei sent Zhao photos of their alleged child, and the medical certificate of birth. Zhao, who got married to his new girlfriend in the meantime, never actually met his child.

According to Xiao Bei, their ‘baby boy’ was hospitalized multiple times, urging Zhao to transfer more money to cover the medical bills.

By late 2018, Zhao’s wife coincidentally discovered Xiao Bei’s deceit while scrolling through social media platform Douyin, and seeing Zhao’s child in the photos of one of Xiao Bei’s friends.

It turned out that Xiao Bei had been using photos of her friend’s baby, and that the alleged medical birth documents where skillfully Photoshopped.

Zhao’s story has now been picked up by the Chinese media. Zhao, who reported Xiao Bei to the police, calls the whole affair “a nightmare.”

On Weibo, the hashtag “Son Turns Out To Be Photoshopped” (#儿子竟是PS的#) received more than 2 million views.

“Anything’s possible with photoshop,” some commenters write: “It is so easy to scam people.”

Also read: Top Scams in China to Watch Out For

Also read: Weibo’s Photoshop Hero, What You See Is Not What You Get

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Memes & Viral

Dutch Vlogger Discovers Her Boyfriend’s Photo on a Chinese TV Drama

Dutch vlogger Rianne Meijer was surprised to discover her boyfriend being somebody else’s lover in this Chinese television drama.

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The Dutch influencer Rianne Meijer has gone viral in the Netherlands and on Chinese social media after she posted a TikTok video in which she shared the discovery of her boyfriend’s photo in a Chinese TV drama.

“Remember this picture? This is a picture that I posted with my boyfriend a while ago,” Rianne says in the TikTok video, then showing a scene in Chinese TV drama in which a photoshopped photo of Rianne’s boyfriend is featured.

Although Rianne stood next to her boyfriend in the original photo, her face was replaced in the photoshopped edition featured on the Chinese TV drama.

“They look good together, it’s fine!” Rianne jokingly responded to the scene.

Rianne Meijer is an online influencer and YouTuber with some 1.5 million fans on her Instagram. She is known for often posting funny videos and photos, sometimes together with her boyfriend Roy.

The scene featuring Roy’s photo comes from the Chinese TV drama Summer Again (薄荷之夏), which premiered on iQiyi in the summer of 2021.

The scene shows a lady named Mi Ya (played by actress Li Borong 李柏蓉) talking about her relationship with a man named ‘Andre.’

On the Chinese social media site Weibo, many netizens found the incident “embarrassing” and did not understand why the staff would just steal someone’s portrait: “Couldn’t the production team even find a foreign guy to take a picture?”

Others also thought the incident was very funny: “This is the reality of our global village. You’d think nobody would find out, but it’s really not so secret.”

According to Rianne’s most recent Tiktok post update, the show’s production staff has since sent her an apology. She also writes it’s “all good,” adding: “They are so sweet and this gave us a good laugh.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

‘Anti-Square Dancing Device’ Goes Viral on Chinese Social Media

This tool might be a solution for Chinese residents experiencing ‘dancing grannies’ noise nuisance.

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The keyword is “反广场舞神器” – the tool that helps local residents find some peace and quiet when dancing grannies take over their public squares with loud music.

No matter where you go in China, from megacities to small towns, there inevitably will be a lively square dancing community. Local residents, usually older and retired residents, meet at a public park or plaza to perform synchronized dance routines together while playing loud music. Square dancing (广场舞) usually takes place in the mornings or in the evenings and is generally seen as a cheap way to stay fit and as a nice occasion to socialize with friends and neighbors.

Although most appreciate seeing the local ‘dancing grannies,’ there are also residents who find their rowdy gatherings annoying. During the time of national exams, for example, stressed-out students sometimes complain that they cannot focus on their studies due to the music blasting from the speakers. There are also others who are bothered by the music of the local dancing seniors.

This week, China’s ‘dancing grannies’ have again become a topic of discussion on social media after a video went viral in which a local resident in Jiangxi uses a special ‘anti-square dance tool’ to stop the music.

In the video, the man from the prefecture-level city of Yingtan (鹰潭) uses a small tool to mute the speakers of the square dancing group who have gathered below his apartment. The man, located in one of the higher apartments facing the square dancing, points his remote at the speakers and once it stops working, the dancing locals stop their activities and walk up and down trying to find out what is wrong with their music player.

Since the device works from a distance of 50-80 meters, anyone using the tool to stop the music won’t easily be discovered by the dancing grannies.

By now, the term ‘anti-square dance magical object’ (“反广场舞神器”) has been making its rounds on social media, with many netizens saying they also want to get this ‘magical tool.’

As described by Cnbeta.com, the device actually is just a powerful, long-distance remote control that can cause interference with some speakers.

On Chinese e-commerce platform Taobao, searches for the ‘anti-square dance device’ currently come up with dozens of results with remote controls, some advertising their product with the slogan: “Say goodbye to disturbance and have your quiet time.” Most ‘anti square dancing’ remote controls are sold for around 250 yuan ($38).

“Finally there’s a solution!”, some netizens write about the remote control. Others are also happy to discover the device, saying it’s the most peaceful way to create some silence when they experience nuisance; some mention that asking the ‘grannies’ to quiet down only results in being scolded anyway.

Others are jokingly predicting that hot sales of the device might result in a street war between opposing dancing groups silencing each other’s speakers.

There are also people who wonder why China’s square dancing grannies can’t just wear ‘silent disco’ headphones while dancing.

Some people warn users of the remote control that Chinese seniors will always find a way to continue square dancing: “You do this today, tomorrow they’re bringing their accordion!”

By Manya Koetse, with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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