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GOBI HAS BEEN FOUND! – Marathon Runner Finds Back Dog in Urumqi

It was the news everybody was hoping for. Gobi, the desert dog that joined Australian runner on his marathon across China and went missing before he could be adopted, has been found back after a long search in the city of Urumqi, China.

Manya Koetse

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It was the news everybody was hoping for. Gobi, the desert dog that joined Australian runner on his marathon across China and went missing before he could be adopted, has been found back after a long search in the city of Urumqi, China.

The story that melted netizens’ hearts this summer was that of runner Dion Leonard who found a true friend in a little stray dog during his participation in the Gobi March of 2016.

Ultra-marathon-runner-Dion-Leonard

BRINGGOBIHOME

The stray dog joined the runner on his run after he hung around the runners’ camp on the first day of the march. The two became inseparable after running for days on end together. The love grew so big that Leonard decided to set up a crowdfunding campaign to cover the costs for bringing the dog he named Gobi back with him to Scotland, where Leonard resides.

But during the first period of quarantine in the city of Urumqi, Gobi unexpectedly run away and went missing. Leonard did not hesitate and flew to China to look for his friend. The search started on August 15 and continued for nine days, with chances and hopes of finding the little stray dog growing smaller every day. Leonard and his helpers asked the help of Weibo netizens, who also spread the news about the missing dog.

Today Leonard and his search team announced on the Bring Gobi Home Facebook page that Gobi had been found:

“Gobi has been found!!! She’s safe & well, a wee sore leg but over joyed to see Dion as you will see in the video! Sticks to him like glue! A massive thank you to all the support, especially the group of Volunteers that have been working tirelessly to find her!
Thank you thank you from the bottom of our hearts, we are overjoyed!”

They also posted a short video that shows a happy Gobi cuddling with Leonard.

Gobi is expected to fly home to Leonard in Edinburg in December, when the quarantine period is finished. That will undoubtedly be one fluffy, merry Christmas.

gobireunited

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

10 Comments

10 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Phyllis Hacker

    August 24, 2016 at 8:20 pm

    Lift the quarantine and let Gobi leave now.

    • Avatar

      Betsy Detrick

      August 24, 2016 at 9:48 pm

      I agree completely. We don’t want to take another change of losing Gobi!! Please, please just let her go home with Dion. Make this a truly happy moment amongst so much sadness!! God bless!!

  2. Avatar

    Philippet Eric

    August 24, 2016 at 11:34 pm

    24/08/2016.
    Nous avons deux chiens du format de Gobi et toutes les heures, nous avons suivit le parcours de Dion Leonard.
    Quel bonheur pour lui, elle ,et nous.
    Félicitations à nos amis chinois pour avoir collaboré à la recherche.
    Eric et Marie-Madeleine.

  3. Avatar

    Michelle Owens

    August 25, 2016 at 11:52 am

    in such a cruel world this is a happy wonderful ending!!. god bless them both – Gobi – little shine run free to a wonderful new life !!!!!
    she was lucky to not be captured by the dog meat traders .

    Leonard you hero 🙂

  4. Avatar

    Joy Gao

    August 25, 2016 at 2:22 pm

    I really hope Gobi can go home with Dion right away, can not afford another missing in another 4 months of time!

  5. Avatar

    Chet Headley

    August 25, 2016 at 5:46 pm

    Why should Gobi have to wait 4 months in quarantine, they let swarms of illegal aliens in without a moments quarantine and they are carrying more diseases than Gobi possibly could. Send her home with Dion where she belongs. If I was Dion and they wouldn’t let her leave with me I’d stay there with her until I could take her home. Please let her go home with Dion immediately; she means too much to millions of us out here; she and Dion are an inspiration to all. Thank God she has been found and is safe.

  6. Avatar

    Alan Feather

    August 25, 2016 at 7:45 pm

    All dogs such as Gobi must be quarantined for 4 months when they enter the UK. The UK is one of only two rabies free countries in the world and it would be insane to risk causing huge suffering to millions of animals in the UK because of one dog, no matter how deserving.

    I am absolutely delighted that Gobi has been found and I am sure they will be very happy together once the necessary quarantine procedures have been completed.

    • Avatar

      Chet Headley

      August 30, 2016 at 11:56 am

      When I made my comment about sending Gobi home with her Dad Dion, I was well aware of the UK’s quarantine policy, which I have no argument with. That’s why I said she should go home now. Why should Gobi have to remain in China for a 4 month quarantine, then endure another four month quarantine in the UK; it doesn’t make sense and I doubt that the UK will waive their quarantine requirements for her.

      Too many bad things can happen during the 4 months in China, to wit what already happened with her being lost. For the grace of God she was found; leaving her in China is pushing luck.

      I don’t understand China’s quarantine policy for a Dog that is exiting the country; my take is that it’s another money grab… an exit-tax, if you will.

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Backgrounder

The PRC Twitter List: The Rise of China on Twitter

“Twittering China’s stories well” – about the surge of Chinese official accounts on Twitter.

Manya Koetse

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Over the past year, there’s been more media coverage on the growing influence of China on global media. When it comes to social media, Twitter has seen a significant surge in accounts representing Chinese official media, diplomatic missions, and state organizations. What’s on Weibo gives an overview of these Twitter accounts and the rise of China on Twitter.

Apart from the countless Chinese official media and government accounts on China’s domestic social media platform Weibo, there is now an increasing number of Beijing-linked accounts that have gone beyond the Great Firewall and have set out for Twitter.

Official Chinese accounts have become more present and more active on foreign social media over the past few years, and we have found that there has been a significant surge of new official accounts arriving on Twitter in 2019 and in early 2020.

Within China, Weibo and WeChat have become increasingly relevant when it comes to public diplomacy. For years now, foreign embassies, media, pundits, and government organizations from all over the world are active on Chinese social media platforms.

The growing ubiquity of digital diplomacy is unsurprising: social media platforms are a low-cost and convenient tool for engaging with local audiences for public diplomacy purposes.

In our article “Digital Diplomacy: These Foreign Embassies Are Most (Un)Popular on Weibo” (2016), we explored the popularity of foreign embassies on Sina Weibo. There is even a term for this kind of diplomacy via Weibo: “Weiplomacy.”

While foreign actors are active on Weibo and other platforms, Chinese actors are also increasingly active in the English-language social media sphere.

The use of Twitter for diplomacy uses is not new, nor is it unique to China. The term used for public diplomacy strategies on Twitter is ‘Twiplomacy,’ and government officials from as many as 178 countries have been using Twitter for diplomatic purposes (Guo et al 2019, 563-564).

 

CHINA’S TWIPLOMACY

 

The use of Twitter for Chinese government purposes has received more media attention recently. In June of this year, news came out that Twitter suspended more than 23,000 ‘fake’ accounts for allegedly being linked to the Chinese Communist Party and spreading ­false information and promote Party narratives to undermine the Hong Kong protests and/or to counter criticism of Beijing’s handling of COVID-19 (Washington Post, 2020).

This development is somewhat surprising, as previous studies have found no evidence of these kinds of automated processes on Twitter as part of Chinese international propaganda efforts (Bolsover & Howard 2019). Noteworthy enough, it was previously found that those using bot activities on the platform to manipulate information about China and Chinese politics were actually anti-China groups (ibid., 2076).

What is clear from the recent growing presence of Chinese state-related accounts on Twitter, is that online political communication promoting Chinese interests is often manually done by real accounts and real people, e.g. state employees, as part of their regular jobs.

China’s shift from traditional forms of public diplomacy and propaganda to more innovative and digital ones has been ongoing for years. Since Xi Jinping’s ascension to power, the media strategy of “telling China’s story well” started to become more prominent in foreign diplomacy efforts (Shambaugh 2020, 17).

But also before this time, between 2009 and 2011, there was a heightened focus on China’s international media presence, with the government spending billions on a global media plan, mainly executed via media agencies such as Xinhua, China Daily, CCTV, and China Radio International (Bolsover & Howard 2019, 2065; Huang & Wang 2020, 118).

The One Belt, One Road summit in May of 2017 was an important digital media moment as Chinese state media and official social media accounts shared new kinds of promotional campaigns targeted at domestic and foreign audiences (see our article). In that same year, social media also played a major role in the propagation of PRC’s “New Era,” which was promoted via short videos, cartoons, and gifs (also see this article).

Whereas China’s foreign online public diplomacy previously mostly seemed to focus on promoting the positive image of China as a peaceful nation (the 2020 study by Huang and Wang on ‘panda engagement’ analyzes the panda-themed tweets of official media accounts on Twitter), we have seen a different trend in China’s digital public diplomacy over the past year.

Yes, there are still panda tweets. But Twitter is also used more and more to also aggressively defend China’s image and attacking others while spreading official narratives on contentious issues such as the South China Sea dispute, US-China trade war, alleged human rights violations in Xinjiang, the Hong Kong protests, and China’s handling of the COVID19 outbreak.

Example of public diplomacy on Twitter, via Ministry of Foreign Affairs @MFA_China (screenshot by What’s on Weibo).

This is not always done in the most sophisticated way. One noteworthy example is that of the China State Council Information Office, tweeting under the (unverified) handle of @chinascio. In 2016 and early 2017, the account repeatedly responded to other twitterers using slang terms such as “dude” or “bro” (“better for you to learn a whole picture of China, dude“), causing hilarity among Twitter users. James Griffith (@jgriffiths) even covered the issue on the CNN website, highlighting the account’s use of the “truth ain’t lie dude” phrase. The controversy was also covered by Chinese Huanqiu Online (Global Times) media outlet.

Other official accounts, such as People’s Daily or that of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs have also sent out tweets in the past that seemed somewhat out of character, using common slang terms such as “dude” or “LOL.”

Over the past two years, Chinese Twitter strategies seem to have become more sophisticated, with an increasing number of state media, diplomatic missions and government organizations joining the American social media platform.

There are, however, new rows coming up over the Twitter use of Chinese officials. In May of 2020, China’s embassy in Paris sent out a tweet portraying a grim reaper – dressed in US flag while holding a scythe with the Star of David – knocking on the door of Hong Kong, with a text saying: “Who’s next?”

Screenshot as posted by Isaac Stone Fish on Twitter
@isaacstonefish

The embassy soon deleted the tweet and released a statement saying its Twitter was hacked. It was not the first time the Embassy came under scrutiny for its Twitter use; the Chinese Ambassador to France was summoned to the Ministry for Europe and Foreign Affairs in April for a series of other provocative tweets during the coronavirus crisis.

The French Minister of Europe and Foreign Affairs stated that the tweets were not “keeping with the quality of the bilateral relationship between our two countries.”

Although Chinese state media outlet Global Times wrote about the official Twitter account that the “Chinese Embassy’s humorous satirical taste delights social media users,” these kinds of online altercations show that China’s global diplomatic offense on Twitter can lead to offline clashes, or rather, that online and offline diplomacy are no longer separate worlds. Digital diplomacy is thus not necessarily just ‘digital diplomacy’ – it’s diplomacy, period.

 

TWITTER USE IN CHINA

 

That there is a growing presence of Chinese official accounts on Twitter does not mean that there is also growing freedom for Chinese web users to use the platform from within mainland China.

Twitter has been blocked in China since June 2009, and is inaccessible unless web users make use of software to circumvent censorship and to jump over the Great Firewall of China. Only a small percentage of Chinese web users do so.

According to a survey by political scientist Daniela Stockmann, cited in the New York Times, some 0.4 percent of China’s internet users, roughly 3.2 million people, use Twitter.

Not only is Twitter blocked in China – Chinese nationals who post critical views on the platform could end up in trouble. In his 2019 New York Times article, Paul Mozur explored the Beijing crackdown of Twitter, writing that a growing number of Chinese twitterers are questioned or even detained for their activities on Twitter.

Chinese activists quoted in the article talk about being advised to remove tweets, and also about being interrogated, threatened, and physically restrained over their Twitter behavior.

Telling – or rather, Twittering – China’s stories well is a key mission in China today. But who Twitters these stories in what ways is strictly controlled.

 

ABOUT THIS LIST

 

To give you an idea of China’s new Twitter diplomacy and to provide insight into the ‘official’ accounts that are active on Twitter today, we have compiled the list below for reference, consisting of some 280 relevant accounts in total.

This list only covers accounts representing mainland Chinese state media, diplomatic missions, and other government & state organizations. It leaves out individual Chinese Twitter users unless they are officially representing Chinese media and/or state and government organizations.

The number of followers for each account is recorded at the time of writing between July 11-20. Accounts are listed going from most number of followers on top.

This list is by no means complete. We might have overseen official accounts (please let us know), and it has left out, for example, the many different accounts run by Confucius Institutes worldwide, and also does not list the state-owned enterprises that are active on Twitter.

This list has been compiled manually by What’s on Weibo – it is not an official list by any means. Please note that we have included accounts that have not been verified by Twitter, as most of these accounts do not have the verified ‘v’ status (yet) – the fact that Twitter’s verified account program has been on hold for a long time might have to do with this.

Although caution is thus advised, we currently have no reason to assume that any of the accounts in this list do not belong to the person or organization they say they represent in their bio.

Contributing to this is the fact that these accounts are also followed by other official accounts that have already been verified. If an account is officially verified, we have tagged it as “VERIFIED ACCOUNT.”

In writing personal names, we stick to the way the person presents their name on Twitter. Mostly, they state their last name first, followed by the given name, but sometimes they use the Western style and turn it around.

This list is not necessarily focused on accounts tweeting in English. Many of the accounts tweet in (traditional) Chinese or other languages including Spanish, Japanese, German, or French (both media and accounts of diplomatic missions).

 

NOTEWORTHY FINDINGS

 

The first official Chinese media accounts to join Twitter are Global Times, CCTV, China Daily, and China Plus News (CRI). They all joined from April-Nov 2009, three years after the founding of Twitter, and in the same year that the platform was blocked in mainland China. This was also the year that the Chinese government under Hu Jintao reportedly spent $8.7 billion on a foreign media expansion project.

From that moment on, Chinese media accounts slowly start joining Twitter. Around the 2012-2013 period, when President Xi Jinping introduces the idea of promoting China in the digital age by “telling China’s stories well,” accounts such as China News, Xinhua News, Guangming Daily, and CGTN all join Twitter. Region-specific accounts, including People’s Daily Arabic, Xinhua Spanish, or CGTN Africa, also all join around this period.

Around the year 2017, we see a small surge in Chinese media, government, and city accounts joining Twitter. This is the year that China’s Belt and Road propaganda machine is running at full speed. It is also the year of the 19th National Congress, when Chinese media focus on the message of “supporting China’s New Era.”

But the most noteworthy first surge of Chinese ‘official’ government-related and diplomatic accounts takes place in 2019 at the time of the Hong Kong Protests. While mass demonstrations and violent clashes take place in Hong Kong, we see a total of 35 new official diplomatic/government accounts joining Twitter from July to November of 2019.

The second rise of Chinese official accounts on Twitter takes place in the period of January to March 2020, when a total of 47 new official diplomatic/government accounts join the platform during the international COVID19 crisis.

There also seems to be a clear shift in China’s “Twiplomacy” regarding the overall tone of Twitter posts. Whereas most of the city and regional accounts – arriving on Twitter since 2012 – engage in “panda twiplomacy” and promote China as a harmonious leader and beautiful tourist destination, many diplomatic and media accounts that joined Twitter later shifted tones in addressing international criticism or clarifying China’s stance in main issues concerning the international community, including the South China Sea issue and the US-China trade war.

Over recent months and weeks, the accounts of many diplomats and other accounts in this list have tweeted out images/information sheets, articles, or videos on “What is True and What is False” regarding international media reports on China’s alleged human rights violations, Hong Kong National Security Law, and COVID19 pandemic. These kinds of “true” and “false” images are often produced by Chinese media outlets and then retweeted by many embassy and/or diplomatic accounts and other media accounts. 

    We also found that this list of Twitter accounts does not mirror Weibo at all – many of the accounts in this list have no presence on Weibo and thus were solely created to speak to an overseas audience.

    The accounts in this list amplify each other by following each other and through retweeting. For example, the @MFA_China account (Ministry of Foreign Affairs) has over 178k followers on Twitter, and often retweets the tweets by other official accounts. The diplomatic, media, and city/region accounts often follow each other.

    Here’s our list! (First version July 21, 2020, updated by adding three more diplomats on July 22, 2020).

    Update August 7 2020: As of August 6, 2020, Twitter implemented government and state-affiliated media account labels on its platform. The label appears on the profile page of the relevant Twitter account, as shown in the example below.

     

    LIST OF CHINA ACCOUNTS ON TWITTER

     

    CHINA GOVERNMENT & STATE RELATED ACCOUNTS


     

    CHINA DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS

     

    Chinese Embassy in Pakistan
    @CathayPak, 104.8K followers
    (Joined Sep 2015)

    Chinese Embassy in Brazil
    @EmbaixadaChina, 72.8K followers
    (Joined May 2018)

    Chinese Embassy in Japan 中華人民共和国駐日本国大使館
    @ChnEmbassy_jp, 69K followers
    (Joined April 2014)

    Chinese Embassy in US
    @ChineseEmbinUS, 45.6K followers
    (Joined June 2019)

    Chinese Mission to UN
    @Chinamission2un, 39.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined April 2015)

    Chinese Embassy in Italy
    @AmbCina, 33K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2018)

    Chinese Embassy in Spain
    @ChinaEmbEsp, 26.3K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Turkey
    @ChinaEmbTurkey, 28.5K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Oct 2015)

    Chinese Embassy in France
    @AmbassadeChine, 24.1K followers
    (Joined August 2019)

    Chinese Embassy to Yemen
    @ChineseEmbtoYEM, 18.2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined September 2019)

    Mission of the People’s Republic of China to the EU
    @ChinaEUMission, 16K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2013)

    Chinese Embassy in UK
    @ChineseEmbinUK, 13.7K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in the Philippines
    @Chinaembmanila, 12.2K followers
    (Joined Feb 2017)

    Chinese Embassy in South Africa
    @ChineseEmbSA, 12K followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Kenya
    @ChineseEmbKenya, 6662 followers
    (Joined March 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Canada
    @ChinaEmbOttawa, 6492 followers
    (Joined June 2014)

    Chinese Embassy in Tanzania
    @ChineseEmbTZ, 6,064 followers
    (Joined Dec 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Zimbabwe
    @ChineseZimbabwe, 5,856 followers
    (Joined Sep 2018)

    Chinese Consulate General in Istanbul
    @chinaconsulist, 4778 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Congo
    @AmbCHINEenRDC, 4654 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Uganda
    @ChineseEmb_Uga, 3943 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2018)

    Chinese Embassy in Venezuela
    @Emb_ChinaVen, 3785 followers
    (Joined September 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Somalia
    @ChineseSomalia, 3424 followers
    (Joined June 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Argentina
    @ChinaEmbArg, 3212 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Sri Lanka
    @ChinaEmbSL, 2920 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Ethiopia
    @ChinaEmbAddis, 2809 followers
    (Joined December 2019)

    China Mission Geneva
    @ChinaMissionGva, 2574 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2015)

    Chinese Embassy in Hungary
    @ChineseEmbinHU, 2527 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Oct 2019)

    Permanent Mission of China in Vienna
    @ChinaMissionVie, 2344 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Oct 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Germany
    @ChinaEmbGermany, 2339 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined December 2019)

    Chinese Consulate General in Chicago
    @ChinaConsulate, 2315 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in the Republic of Chad
    @ambchinetchad, 2272 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Iraq
    @ChinaIraq, 2187 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined January 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Ireland
    @ChinaEmbIreland, 2157 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Poland
    @ChinaEmbPoland, 2102 followers
    (Joined July 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Grenada
    @ChinaEmbGrenada, 2033 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Oct 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Kazakhstan
    @ChinaEmbKazakh, 1957 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Burundi
    @AmbChineBurundi, 1818 followers
    (Joined June 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Guinea 中国驻几内亚大使馆
    @chine_guinee, 1769 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Slovenia
    @ChinaEmSlovenia, 1632 followers
    (Joined Dec 2017)

    Chinese Embassy in Mali
    @Chine_au_Mali, 1452 followers
    (Joined Aug 2018)

    Chinese Consulate General in Calgary
    @ChinaCGCalgary, 1442 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Austria
    @chinaembaustria, 1391 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Colombia
    @china_embajada, 1343 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Jordan
    @ChineseembassyJ, 1321 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Angola
    @ChinaEmbAngola, 1391 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Papua New Guinea
    @ChineseEmb_PNG, 1344 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Samoa 中国驻萨摩亚大使馆
    @chinaandsamoa, 1187 followers
    (Joined September 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Liberia
    @ChineseLiberia, 1163 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined December 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Cameroon
    @AmbChineCmr, 1130 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2019)

    Consulate-Generale of China in Rio de Janeiro
    @ConsulChinaRJ, 1119 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined December 2019)

    Consultate General of People’s Republic of China in Nagoya
    @ChnConsulateNgo, 1071 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Albania
    @ChinaembassyT , 1023 followers
    (Joined April 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Belarus 中国驻白俄罗斯大使馆
    @ZhongBai2020, 975 followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

    Consulate General of China in Barcelona 中国驻巴塞罗那总领馆
    @ConsulChinaBcn, 968 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Nigeria
    @china_emb_ng, 946 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Denmark
    @ChinaInDenmark, 904 followers
    (Joined May 2017)

    Chinese Embassy in the Slovak Republic 中国驻斯洛伐克使馆
    @ChinaEmbSVK, 867 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Peru
    @ChinaEmbPeru, 799 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Suriname
    @CHNEmbSuriname, 793 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Consulate of China in Niigata 中華人民共和国駐新潟総領事館の新ちゃん
    @ChnConsulateNgt, 737 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Consulate General of China in Jeju
    @jejuZLG, 736 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined October 2019)

    Consulate General of the People’s Republic of China in Dubai
    @CGPRCinDubai, 724 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2019)

    Consulate General of China in Fukuoka 中華人民共和国駐福岡総領事館
    @ChnConsulateFuk, 722 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Russia
    @ChineseEmbinRus, 673 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Tonga 中国驻汤加大使馆
    @embassy_chinese, 611 followers
    (Joined Nov 2019)

    Chinese Embassy in Czech Republic
    @ChineseEmbinCZ, 502 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Ghana
    @ChinaEmbinGH, 478 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Djibouti
    @ChineAmbDjibout, 424 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Consulat Général de Chine à Lyon
    @China_Lyon, 280 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Embassy of China in the Netherlands
    @ChinaEmbNL, 269 followers
    (Joined June 2020)

    Chinese Consulate General in Johannesburg
    @ChnConsulateJhb, 241 followers
    (Joined Oct 2019)

    Chinese Consulate General in Sydney
    @ChinaConSydney, 227 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Chinese Embassy in Serbia
    @EmbChina_RS, 216 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    Consulate-General of China in Strasbourg
    @consulat_de, 203 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Consulate General in San Francisco
    @ConsulateSan, 131 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Chinese Consulate General in Edinburgh
    @chinacgedi, 110 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Chinese Consulate General in Belfast 中国驻贝尔法斯特总领事馆
    @CCGBelfast, 39 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

     

    CHINESE AMBASSADORS AND DIPLOMATS

     

    Cui Tiankai, @AmbCuiTiankai
    Chinese Ambassador to the US, 79.2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2019)

    Sun Weidong, @China_Amb_India
    Chinese Ambassador to India, 75.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2017)

    Liu Xiaoming, @AmbLiuXiaoMing
    Chinese Ambassador to the UK, 67.8K Followers
    (Joined Oct 2019)

    Yang Wanming, @WanmingYang
    Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Federative Republic of Brazil, 47.7K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2015)

    Hou Yanqi, @PRCAmbNepal
    Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to Nepal, 43.7K Followers
    (Joined June 2019)

    Chen Weiqing, @AmbChenWeiQing
    Ambassador of China in Saudi Arabia , 33.3K followers
    (Joined July 2019)

    Chang Hua, @AmbChangHua
    Ambassador of China to the Islamic Republic of Iran, 16.6K followers
    (Joined Oct 2019)

    Wei Qiang 魏强 , @weiasecas
    Chinese Ambassador to Panamá, 15.9K followers
    (Joined Nov 2017)

    Zhang Heqing, @zhang_heqing
    Cultural Counsellor, Director of China Cultural Center in Pakistan, 15.2K followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    Zhang Run, @EmbZhangRun
    Chinese Ambassador to Dominican Republic, 12.1K followers
    (Joined Dec 2018)

    Zhang Lizhong, @AmbassadorZhang
    Chinese Ambassador to Maldives, 11.8K followers
    (Joined June 2019)

    Wang Yu 王愚, @ChinaEmbKabul
    Chinese Ambassador to Afghanistan, 11.2 followers
    (Joined Jan 2017)

    Li Xiaosi, @li_xiaosi
    Chinese Ambassador to Austria, 11.1K followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Deng Xijun, @China2ASEAN
    Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to ASEAN, 10.3K followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

    Chen Bo, @AmbChenBo
    Ambassador of China to Serbia, 9531 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Zha Liyou 查立友, @ZhaLiyou
    CG of China in Kolkata 中国驻加尔各答总领事, 9935 followers
    VERIFIED (Joined August 2019)

    Mu Xiaodong 沐小东, @Xiaodong_Mu
    Diplomat and Consul of Chinese Embassy in Myanmar, 8086
    (Joined April 2016)

    Zhang Yiming, @Amb_Yiming
    Ambassador of China to the Republic of Namibia, 7467 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2019)

    Guo Shaochun, @China_Amb_Zim
    Chinese Ambassador to Zimbabwe, 7434 followers
    (Joined April 2019)

    Liao Liqiang, @AmbLiaoLiqiang
    Chinese Ambassador to Egypt, 7232 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2019)

    Li Bijian 李碧建, @libijian2
    Consul General of China to Karachi, 7011 followers
    (Joined January 2020)

    Ji Rong, @ChinaSpox_India
    Spokesperson of Chinese Embassy in India, 6330 Followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Quan Liu @AmbLiuQuan
    Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Republic of Suriname, 5814 followers
    (Joined Sept 2019)

    Wang Kejian, @ChinainLebanon
    Chinese Ambassador to Lebanon, 5752 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Zhu Liying (朱立英), @LiyingZHU1
    Chinese Ambassador to Mali, 5593 followers
    (Joined August 2019)

    Ou Jianhong, @oujianhong
    Embajadora de China in El Salvador, 4619 followers
    (Joined August 2018)

    Feng Biao, @AmbFengBiao
    Chinese Ambassador To Syria, 4630 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Liu Guangyuan, @AmbLiuGuangYuan
    Chinese Ambassador to Poland, 3867 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Xu Hong, @PRCAmbNL
    Chinese Ambassador to the Netherlands, 3485 followers
    (Joined Nov 2019)

    Zhu Jing 朱京, @Amb_ZhuJing
    Ambassador of People’s Republic of China to Congo, 3360 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2020)

    Chen Xu, @Amb_ChenXu
    Chinese Ambassador, Permanent Representative to UN office in Geneva, 3171 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2019)

    Zhang Jun, @ChinaAmbUN
    China’s Permanent Representative to the UN, 3013 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Liu Yuxi, @Ambassador_Liu
    Chinese Ambassador to the AU and the UNECA, 2787 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined October 2019)

    Zhao Yongchen, @DrZhaoyongchen
    Chinese Ambassador to Grenada, 2416 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2019)

    Huang Xingyuan, @AmbassadorHuang
    Chinese Ambassador to Cyprus, 2069 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Cao Yi (Abou Wassim), @CAOYI170610
    Consul, Embassy of China in Lebanon, 2015 followers
    (Joined May 2018)

    Zhang Ping, @CGZhangPingLA
    Official Twitter for Consul General of the People’s Republic of China in Los Angeles, 1642 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2019)

    Dong Zhihua, @Dong_zhihua
    WA Consul General, 1607 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    Lin Jing 林静, @CGCHINA_CPT
    Chinese Consul General in Cape Town, 1451 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Cao Zhongming, @ChinaAmbBelgium
    Chinese Ambassador to the Kingdom of Belgium, 1429 followers
    (Joined Dec 2019)

    Liu_Hongyang, @LiuHongyang4
    Ambassador of China to Malawi, 1265 followers
    (Joined Feb 2018)

    Zheng ZhuQiang, @ChinaAmbUganda
    Ambassador of China to Uganda, 1163 followers
    (Joined March 2018)

    Li Li, @AmbassadeurLiLi
    Ambassador of China to Marocco, 1085 followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

    Zhao Qinghua, @Dr_ZhaoQinghua
    Consul General of China in Zurich and for the Principality of Liechtenstein, 765 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2020)

    Li Yang, @CGChinaLiYang
    Consule-General China in Rio de Janeiro, 727 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Yan Xiusheng 延秀生, @YXiusheng
    Chinese Ambassador to Barbados, 614 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Chinese Embassy Bangkok, @chineseembassy1
    Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to Thailand, 567 followers
    (Joined May 2019)

    Fang Yi @FangYi85320692
    Spokesperson & Head of Political Office of the Chinese Embassy in Uganda, 550 followers
    (Joined Jan 2018)

    Gu Wenliang 顾文亮, @GuWenliang
    Agricultural Commissioner, Chinese Embassy in the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, 527 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Lijun Xing 邢立军 @xing_lijun
    Chinese Diplomat in Pakistan, 514 followers
    (Joined April 2017)

    Lei Kezhong, @AmbassadorLei
    Chinese Ambassador to Lesotho, 494 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Zhou Jian, @AmbZhouJian
    Chinese Ambassador to the State of Qatar, 452 followers
    (Joined Feb 2020)

    Li Song 李松, @Amb_LiSong
    Chinese Ambassador for Disarmament Affairs, Deputy Permanent Representative to UN Office in Geneva, 437 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2020)

    Du Xiaohui, @GeneralkonsulDu
    Generalkonsul der VR China in Hamburg, 341 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined February 2020)

    Ribiao Chen, @RibiaoChen
    Minister Counsellor of the Chinese Embassy in the Hague, 249 followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

    SONG C.Q., @Song_Chq
    Deputy Chief & Political Counselor of Chinese Embassy in Lesotho, 216 followers
    (Joined Sep 2007)

    Wang Donghua, @WDonghua
    Consul General of the People’s Republic of China in San Francisco
    (Joined March 2020)

    Spokesperson of the Chinese Embassy in Egypt
    @CHN_EGY, 126 followers
    (Joined June 2020)

    Song Yichu, @YichuSong
    Chinese diplomat in Pakistan, 98 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Zhang Meifang 张美芳总领事, @CGMeifangZhang
    Consul General of China to Belfast, 63 followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

    Liu Yuyin 刘玉印, @ChnMission
    Spokesperson Permanent Mission of China to the United Nations, 13 followers
    (Joined Jan 2020)

     

    CHINA GOVERNMENT & STATE ACCOUNTS

     

    Zhao Lijian 赵立坚 / Foreign Ministry Spokesperson
    @zlj517, 731.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2010)

    Hua Chunying 华春莹 / Foreign Ministry Spokesperson
    @SpokespersonCHN, 579.4K followers
    (Joined October 2019)

    Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Spokesperson发言人办公室
    @MFA_China, 177.4K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined October 2019)

    State Council Information Office of China 中华人民共和国国务院新闻办公室
    @chinascio, 38.6K followers
    (Joined September 2015)

    Hu Zhaoming / Spokesperson of the International Department of the CPC Central Committee 中联部发言人胡兆明
    @SpokespersonHZM, 6494 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    CIDCA China International Development Cooperation Agency
    @cidcaofficial, 4969 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Fu Cong 傅聪 / Director-General of The Department of Arms Control (MFA)
    @FuCong17, 2945 followers
    (Joined June 2020)

     

    CITY / REGION ACCOUNTS 


     

    Visit Xiamen
    @VisitXiamen, 228.1K followers
    (Joined Oct 2016)

    Suzhou, China
    @VisitSuzhou, 187.8k followers
    (Joined Jan 2015)

    Visit Wuhan
    @visit_wuhan, 154.6K followers
    (Joined Jan 2018)

    Visit Beijing
    @VisitBeijingcn, 117.4K followers
    (Joined July 2014)

    Shenyang
    @ShenyangChina, 102.3K followers
    (Joined Nov 2017)

    Kunshan
    @Kunshan_China, 100.5K followers
    (Joined Dec 2016)

    HANGZHOU TOURISM and CULTURE
    @TOURISMHANGZHOU, 100.3L followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2014)

    Hangzhou, China
    @Hangzhou_CHINA, 95.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2012)

    Jiangsu, China
    @GoJiangsu, 84.3K followers
    (Joined Jan 2015)

    Visit Shaanxi
    @visitshaanxi, 66.7K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2013)

    VisitJiangsu
    @VisitJiangsu, 53.4K followers
    (Joined Feb 2016)

    Changsha
    @ChangshaCity, 46.8K followers
    (Joined April 2017)

    Anhui China
    @AnhuiChina, 45.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2018)

    Visit Sichuan-China
    @Amazingsichuan, 39.9K followers
    (Joined Aug 2014)

    Guangzhou China
    @Guangzhou_City, 39.4K followers
    (Joined July 2015)

    FuzhouCity
    @FuzhouCity, 37.2K followers
    (Joined Dec 2015)

    Wuzhen China
    @Wuzhen__China, 34.8K followers
    (Joined April 2017)

    Xiangyang
    @XiangyangCity, 33K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2015)

    Wuxi China 魅力無錫
    @WuxiCity, 31.7K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined March 2015)

    Rugao City
    @RugaoCity, 24.5K followers
    (Joined Jan 2018)

    Visit Guangxi-China
    @VisitGuangxi, 23.8K followers
    (Joined Dec 2017)

    Nanjing China
    @GoToNanjing, 22.1K followers
    (Joined Oct 2017)

    Guizhou, China
    @iloveguizhou, 14K followers
    (Joined July 2018)

    Visit Weifang, China
    @visitweifang, 12.8K followers
    (Joined Sep 2016)

    Hefei, China
    @HefeiChina, 8857 followers
    (Joined March 2018)

    Ordos, China
    @OrdosChina, 7447 followers
    (Joined May 2017)

    Visit Haikou
    @visithaikou, 7020 followers
    (Joined Oct 2016)

    Discover Foshan
    @DiscoverFoshan, 6812 followers
    (Joined Dec 2019)

    Visit Yantai
    @VisitYantai, 6113 followers
    (Joined Nov 2016)

    Incredible Jinan
    @JinanofChina, 6513 followers
    (Joined August 2019)

    Chengdu China
    @Chengdu_China, 4710 followers
    (Joined Feb 2012)

    Discover Hohhot
    @HohhotChina, 4547 followers
    (Joined July 2019)

    Visit Xi’an
    @VisitXian, 3734 followers
    (Joined Aug 2017)

    Friendly Shandong
    @VisitShandong, 3437 followers
    (Joined Nov 2013)

    Discover Ningxia
    @DiscoverNingxia, 2821 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2015)

    This is Zhongshan
    @ThisisZhongshan, 1890 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    Discover Yunnan
    @DiscoverYunnan, 1720 followers
    (Joined Oct 2014)

    Inner Mongolia China
    @InnerMongolia70, 1686 followers
    (Joined June 2017)

    Discover Kunming
    @DiscoverKunming, 1621 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2014)

    Xiong’an New Area
    @Xiongan_NewArea, 1271 followers
    (Joined Nov 2017)

    Guangdong China
    @iGuangdong, 1164 followers
    (Joined Nov 2015)

    Visit Rizhao
    @VisitRizhao, 562 followers
    (Joined January 2017)

    Visit Wulong
    @VisitWulong, 550 followers
    (Joined Sep 2016)

    Visit Zhengzhou
    @visitzhengzhou, 390 followers
    (Joined Feb 2017)

    Visit Kaifeng
    @visitkaifeng, 275 followers
    (Joined September 2016)

    Visit Jining
    @VisitJining, 180 followers
    (Joined Feb 2017)

    Visit Tianjin
    @VisitTianjin, 163 followers
    (Joined Jan 2017)

    Visitluoyang
    @VisitLuoyang, 136 followers
    (Joined March 2017)

    Visit Fuzhou
    @visit_fuzhou, 113 followers
    (Joined April 2017)

    Visit Zunyi
    @VisitZunyi, 93 followers
    (Joined Dec 2016)

    Visit Weihai,China
    @VisitWeihai, 71 followers
    (Joined Oct 2016)

    Zhejiang Tourism
    @tourzj1, 54 followers
    (Joined March 2014)

    Invest Nantong
    @InvestNantong, 46 followers
    (Joined March 2020)

    Visit Quzhou
    @VisitQuzhou, 3 followers
    (Joined June 2020)

     

    CHINA OFFICIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS AND STATE-OWNED MEDIA OUTLETS


     

    CGTN
    @CGTNOfficial, 13.9M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Jan 2013)

    China Xinhua News
    @XHNews, 12.6M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined February 2012)

    People’s Daily, China
    @PDChina, 7.1M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2011)

    China Daily
    @ChinaDaily, 4.3M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2009)
    *(Wang Hao, @hongfenghuang
    Deputy editor-in-chief of China Daily, 8811 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2017))

    Global Times
    @globaltimesnews, 1.8M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2009)
    *(Hu Xijin @胡锡进
    Editor-in-chief Global Times, 408.3K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2014))

    New China 中文
    @XinhuaChinese, 1.3M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2015)

    China.org.cn
    @chinaorgcn, 1.1M followers
    (Joined May 2010)
    *(Xiaohui Wang 王晓辉 @wangxh65
    Editor-in-Chief of http://China.org.cn., 1194 followers
    (Joined April 2020))

    CCTV
    @CCTV, 1M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2009)

    CGTN Français
    @CGTNFrancais, 1M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2013)

    China Science
    @ChinaScience, 1M followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2019)

    Modern China
    @PDChinaBusiness, 931.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2019)

    Beautiful China
    @PDChinaLife, 870.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2019)

    China Plus News
    @ChinaPlusNews, 771.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined April 2009)

    People’s Daily 人民日報
    @PDChinese, 753.3K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2013)

    CGTN Arabic
    @cgtnarabic, 692.3K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2016)

    Xinhua Sports
    @XHSports, 656K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2016)

    China News 中国新闻网
    @Echinanews, 649.9K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2011)

    CGTN en Español
    @cgtnenespanol, 604.6K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Aug 2016)

    Xinhua Culture&Travel
    @XinhuaTravel, 545k followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2019)

    China News Service 中國新聞社
    @CNS1952, 486.2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2013)

    FlyOverChina
    @FlyOverChina, 448.2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined March 2019)

    SHINE (Shanghai United Media Group)
    @shanghaidaily, 415.9K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined January 2009)

    CGTN America
    @cgtnamerica, 289.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2012)

    Yicai Global 第一财经 (Financial news arm of Shanghai Media Group)
    @yicaichina, 263,2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined March 2016)

    Guangming Daily
    @Guangming_Daily, 238.6K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2012)

    Pueblo En Línea /Spanish version of People’s Daily Online
    @PuebloEnLnea, 150K followers
    (Joined Dec 2012)

    CGTN Africa
    @cgtnafrica, 146.2K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2012)

    People’s Daily Arabic صحيفة الشعب اليومية بالعربية
    @PeopleArabic, 132.5K followers
    (Joined Dec 2012)

    China Xinhua Español
    @XHespanol, 118.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2012)

    CPEC Official (China-Pakistan Economic Corridor by CRI)
    @CPEC_Official, 102.7K followers
    (Joined Jan 2016)

    Beijing Review
    @BeijingReview, 96.6K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined June 2009)

    Quotidien du Peuple
    @french_renmin, 86.7K followers
    (Joined Aug 2011)

    CRI Français
    @CriFrancais, 77K followers
    (Joined Jan 2016)

    Sixth Tone (Shanghai United Media Group)
    @sixthtone, 75.6K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2016)

    China Xinhua News Japanese
    @XHJapanese, 61.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined March 2015)

    Xinhua North America
    @XHNorthAmerica, 38.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Dec 2016)

    People’s Daily Japanese 人民網日本
    @peopledailyJP, 34.3K followers
    (Joined May 2011)

    ShanghaiEye (SMG: Shanghai Media Group)
    @ShanghaiEye, 29.4K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined October 2015)

    China Daily Asia
    @ChinaDailyAsia, 28.3K followers
    (Joined April 2011)

    CCTV+
    @CCTV_plus, 27.7K followers
    (Joined Jan 2015)

    Renmin Ribao Online
    @RenminDeutsch, 27.4K followers
    (Joined May 2014)

    China Culture
    @Chinacultureorg, 21.8K followers
    (Joined Nov 2015)

    CRI Japanese CRI日本語
    @CRIjpn, 20.5K followers
    (Joined Feb 2015)

    Qingdao / ChindaDaily
    @loveqingdao, 19.7K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2016)

    Global Times Chinese 环球时报
    @GlobalTimes_CN, 18.9K followers
    (Joined May 2018)

    Chine Nouvelle
    @XHChineNouvelle, 17.3K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2014)

    Xinhua Myanmar
    @XHMyanmar, 13.1K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Feb 2015)

    ChinaXinhuaPortugues
    @XHportugues, 12.8K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2015)

    The Business Source
    @GlobalTimesBiz, 12.6K followers
    (Joined Feb 2016)

    China Daily Europe
    @ChinaDailyEU, 10.9K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined May 2011)
    *(Chen Weihua 陈卫华, @chenweihua
    China Daily EU Bureau Chief, 21.5K followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2009))

    @XHSwahili
    @XHSwahili, 9587 followers
    (Joined July 2015)

    CGTN Europe
    @CGTNEurope, 8302 followers
    (Joined Dec 2016)

    The Paper 澎湃新闻 (Shanghai United Media Group)
    @thepapercn, 7725 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined August 2019)

    CCTV Arabic
    @cctvarabic, 6446 followers
    (Joined July 2012)

    China Xinhua Deutsch
    @XHdeutsch, 5981 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Sep 2015)

    XinhuaRomania
    @XHRomania, 5491 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined July 2015)

    Global Times Russia
    @GlobalTimesRus, 2589 followers
    VERIFIED ACCOUNT (Joined Nov 2017)

    GTLife
    @GlobalTimesLife, 1720 followers
    (Joined April 2016)

    CGTN World Insight with Tian Wei
    @WorldInsight_TW, 1517 followers
    (Joined Feb 2017)

    Women of China
    @womenofchina, 1400 followers
    (Joined Jan 2011)

    People’s Daily app

    @PeoplesDailyapp, 1379 followers
    (Joined Feb 2018)

    China Daily Hong Kong
    @CDHKedition, 1141 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    CGTNChina24
    @China24Official, 720 followers
    (Joined Oct 2019)

    China Daily Africa
    @CDAfricaNews, 690 followers
    (Joined Aug 2016)

    China Daily USA
    @ChinaDailyUSA, 652 followers
    (Joined Sep 2018)

    Visual China / ChinaDaily
    @CD_visual, 645 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    China.org.cn German
    @germanchinaorgc, 596 followers
    (Joined August 2011)

    Xinhua Africa
    @xinhua_africa, 568 followers
    (Joined April 2012)

    China Daily World
    @ChinaDailyWorld. 535 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    CGTN Global Watch
    @GlobalWatchCGTN, 514 followers
    (Joined May 2018)

    People’s Daily – Hong Kong
    @PDChinaHK, 451 followers
    (Joined June 2020)

    China Daily Life
    @ChinaDaily_Life, 418 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    CGTN Culture
    @CGTN_Culture, 362 followers
    (Joined Oct 2019)

    CGTN Tech
    @CGTNTech, 286 followers
    (Joined Dec 2018)

    CGTN Stories
    @CGTNStories, 267 followers
    (Joined November 2019)

    China Daily Opinion
    @CdOpinion, 254 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    CGTN Sports
    CGTNSports, 183 followers
    (Joined Dec 2016)

    China Daily Asia-Pacific 中國日報亞太
    @Chinadaily_CH, 153 followers
    (Joined May 2020)

    China Daily Russia
    @chinadailyrus, 131 followers
    (Joined April 2020)

    China Daily EU
    @ChinaDaily_EU, 104 followers
    (Joined Feb 2019)

    China Youth Daily
    @ChinaYouthOL, 69 followers
    (Joined Sep 2019)

    By Manya Koetse


    Do you find this kind of research insightful? Would you like to read more about trends in China and its online media? Please consider supporting What’s on Weibo here so we can keep writing articles such as this one. Your small donation makes a big impact.

    This is original work by What’s on Weibo, please do not copy, reproduce this content, nor distribute any part of this content over any network.

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Continue Reading

China Books & Literature

From “Voice of the People” to “Traitor of China”: The Rise and Fall of Fang Fang’s Wuhan Diary

How a Weibo journal got caught up in pandemic politics: the Wuhan Diary controversy explained.

Manya Koetse

Published

on

Fang Fang’s critical online account of the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan was widely celebrated before it was strongly condemned. This is a look into one of the biggest controversies in China’s online media spheres this spring, and a breakdown of how this acclaimed Chinese novelist went from an ally in times of lockdown, to a traitor during pandemic politics.

 
This is the “WE…WEI…WHAT?” column by Manya Koetse, original publication in German by Goethe Institut China (forthcoming), see Goethe.de: WE…WEI…WHAT? Manya Koetse erklärt das chinesische Internet.
 

As China is gradually getting back to business after the COVID-19 crisis, the coronavirus crisis is still dominating social media discussions. But the way the virus comes up in online debates has changed over the past few weeks, as the global health crisis has become increasingly politicized. Rather than a show of global solidarity, the pandemic has spawned a lot of finger-pointing in online media and on social networking sites across the world.

Who is to blame for the spread of the virus? Who is doing more, which leader is doing better, where is the crisis mismanaged? What is fake news, what is truth? Who writes or says what for which reason?

Somewhere within these corona media wars and political games, there’s the controversy regarding Wuhan Diary, which recently became a heated topic of debate on Weibo and beyond. 

 

FANG FANG AND WUHAN DIARY

“Fang was saying the things so many people wanted to say, and was asking the questions so many wanted answers to”

 

Wuhan Diary (武汉日记[1]) is written by the 65-year-old acclaimed Chinese author Wang Fang, better known as Fang Fang (方方).[2] It is an online account of the 2020 Hubei lockdown, originally published on WeChat and Weibo.

Throughout the lockdown period in January, February, and March, Fang Fang wrote about life in quarantine in province capital Wuhan, the heart of the epicenter, documenting everything from the weather to the latest news and the personal stories and tragedies behind the emerging crisis.

Fang’s 60-post diary was published on her Weibo account (@方方), which had some 3,8 million followers at the time, from late January shortly after the lockdown began, until late March when the end of the lockdown was announced.

Shortly after starting her online account, Fang’s daily journal gained wide traction. Amid the panic and uncertainty of the early days of the lockdown, social media flooded with rumors, fake news, and misinformation. Chinese web users were looking for alternative reliable sources to find out what was really happening in Wuhan.

Fang’s online journal provided people with information regarding the new coronavirus, but it also captured the emotions and struggles of the people in Wuhan. She soon became a go-to first-hand account of what was going on in the city; she was the voice of a quarantined city in distress. At a time when people were craving unfiltered information and distrusting official media, her words became an anchor for many in a sea of confusing news flows.

The fact that Fang is a respected author contributed to the popularity of her online writings. With her compassionate representations of everyday life in Wuhan, she has since long been an important author for the regional literature. Her writings have drawn attention ever since the 1980s, when she won an award for the best National Novella (Landscape 风景, 1987). She has remained a relevant author throughout the years, even receiving the prestigious Lu Xun Literary Prize in 2010.

In documenting life in Wuhan during the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak, Fang touched upon many sensitive issues. Besides writing about problems such as overcrowded hospitals and mask shortages, she also directly questioned how authorities were handling the crisis and warned other writers for propaganda manipulation.

With the death of ‘whistleblower’ doctor Li Wenliang on the night of February 6, Chinese social media saw an outpouring of anger at Chinese authorities and state media. The public’s anger showed itself at other moments too, both online and offline.

While many of Fang’s publications on social media were censored and her Weibo account was temporarily blocked, the online Wuhan Diary only gained more attention, with the daily entries (or screenshots) spreading across WeChat like wildfire. “Dear internet censors, you should let Wuhan people speak,”[3] Fang wrote in February.

By demanding more transparency and accountability from Chinese (local) leadership, Fang was saying the things so many people wanted to say and was asking the questions so many wanted answers to.

 

CHANGING US-VERSUS-THEM DYNAMICS

“Whose side is she on, anyway?”

 

It did not take long for Fang’s online journal to gain international attention. In mid-February, news articles covering the ‘forbidden diary’ from Wuhan also appeared in foreign media.

Although Fang’s online writings received some backlash before – her critics mainly disliked how much of her diary entries were not fact-based but “merely hearsay” -, it wasn’t until April when public opinion really shifted against Wuhan Diary after it became known that an international edition of her diary was on presale through Amazon.

First, there was the announcement of the English version with the title “Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from the Original Epicenter” (later changed to “Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from a Quarantined City”, translation by Michael Berry) published by Harper Collins; then, a German edition translated by Michael Kahn-Ackermann and issued by Hoffman Camp Press.

The criticism that Fang Fang has since been facing on Chinese social media is unprecedented. Rather than a Wuhan ally, many of her online readers now think of her as a “traitor” to China[4], saying she is airing China’s dirty laundry to make a profit, and that she only writes about negativity and darkness to play to the tune of those countries slamming China. The author has seen an online stream of death threats and violent comments.

Fang Fang arguably would not have received as much backlash if China had not come to face such international scrutiny in light of the global spread of COVID-19. At the time of the early coronavirus outbreak and Fang’s first diary entry, the corona crisis was still a national one, and to some extent even a regional one. Many saw Fang, a Wuhan native and acclaimed author, as a spokesperson for the people in times of fear, uncertainty, and collective suffering.

But as China increasingly came under international pressure over how it handled the epidemic in its early phases, anti-foreign and nationalistic sentiments grew by the day. With China being blamed for causing the pandemic – American President Trump even suggesting it did so deliberately – waves of angry nationalism flooded Chinese social media, and Wuhan Diary was caught in the changing us-versus-them dynamics of China’s COVID-19 crisis.

In the eyes of many Chinese web users, a translated version of Fang’s critical account of the Wuhan outbreak would only provide opponents of China with more ammunition. The upcoming translation’s description on Amazon by itself was a source of outrage for many, allegedly putting too much emphasis on China’s mishandling of the early outbreak. The fact that the original title of the book emphasized that COVID-19 started in Wuhan[5] was also something many netizens found offensive.  ‘Whose side is she on anyway?’, they wondered.

“Western countries are attacking the motherland, and Fang Fang is knowingly giving them the bullets in advance,” one Weibo commenter from Beijing wrote.

 

AN ONGOING ISSUE

Your Wuhan Diary will only worsen Western misconceptions about China!”

 

The Wuhan Diary controversy seems to be an ongoing one. By early May, it was reported that at least two Chinese academics were reprimanded for speaking out in support of Fang Fang. Online discussions continue. By now, the Weibo hashtag “Fang Fang Diary” (#方方日记#) has received over 670 million views, with other scattered hashtags also drawing in thousands of responses.

On Fang Fang’s Weibo page, now followed by more than 4,6 million web users, the author has responded to the recent controversy and allegations in multiple lengthy posts, claiming that most of her attackers, who blame her for only writing negative things, did not even read her diary. She argues that her written account is one of a trapped Wuhan resident in the middle of a catastrophe and that it should not be taken out of its this context.

Fang Fang is not the first Chinese writer to face online backlash for how ‘China’ is represented to the outside world. Besides the fact that Chinese literature is virtually inseparable from politics, there is an enormous number of Chinese web users ready to be outraged about China being misconstrued, ridiculed, humiliated, or otherwise suffering foreign insult.

This kind of angry nationalism often surfaces on the Chinese internet, and it has done so since the early days of social media in China. According to Ying Jiang, the author of Cyber-Nationalism in China, the roots of this “angry nationalism” expressed by today’s Chinese netizens can be traced back to China’s modern history, and more specifically to the “Century of Humiliation” (mid-1800s until after WWII) during which China faced many hardships brought about by foreign powers.

This history has been an important component of Chinese education campaigns for decades, and along with the economic prospering of China, the country has seen the rise of a more patriotic populace that is nationalistic in a way that is also increasingly anti-foreign.

Especially during noteworthy times such as the coronavirus outbreak – an opportunity for China to establish more international leadership -, negative media representations of the country, its government, and how it handled the COVID-19 crisis are sensitive and prone to controversy. A telling example is that three journalists of The Wall Street Journal were expelled from China in February over the paper’s refusal to apologize for a published opinion article titled “China Is the Real Sick Man of Asia.”

The online anger over Fang’s translated work will not die out any time soon. On Weibo, discussions continue. “Fang Fang, your Wuhan Diary, that’s merely hearsay and overly subjective, will only worsen Western misconceptions about China, and will only make more Western people discriminate against Chinese! You’ll go down in history as a disgrace!”, one Weibo user writes in early May.

Although many will not agree on how Wuhan Diary will be remembered, all the commotion and criticism has only increased the public’s awareness about the book’s existence; it will surely go down in the history of the COVID-19 impact in China, and the online media wars that came with it.

The English translation of Wuhan Diary is expected to be released via Amazon on May 19 (link), the English audiobook on May 28 (link) the German translation is expected June 9. On the China Digital Times website, Josh Rudolph has also translated parts of Fang’s work.

 

By Manya Koetse
Follow @whatsonweibo

For more COVID-19 related articles, please click here.

 

[1] Also known in Chinese as: 武汉封城日记.

[2] Fang Fang is the pen name of Wang Fang.

[3] Zhao, Kiki. 2020. “Opinion: The Coronavirus Story is Too Big for China to Spin.” The New York Times, Feb 14 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/14/opinion/china-coronavirus-social-media.html [5.2.2020].

[4] Mainly using Chinese terms汉奸 and 卖国贼, both meaning “traitor” or more specifically “traitor to China.”

[5] Also see the original German title of the translation: “Wuhan Diary – Das Verbotenen Tagebuch aus der Stadt, in der die Corona-Krise began” [The Forbidden Diary from the City where the Coronacrisis Began].

Sources and further reading

Adlakha, Hemant. 2020.”Fang Fang: The ‘Conscience of Wuhan’ Amid Coronavirus Quarantine.” The Diplomat , March 23 https://thediplomat.com/2020/03/fang-fang-the-conscience-of-wuhan-amid-coronavirus-quarantine/[5.3.2010].

Fumian, Marco. 2020. “To Serve the People or the Party: Fang Fang’s Wuhan Diary and Chinese Writers at the Time of Coronavirus.” MCLC Resource Center Publication (April 2020) https://u.osu.edu/mclc/online-series/marco-fumian/?fbclid=IwAR32HvM6WO0JHIhFFIY85bd-qyOzGEfXrZpp6S0SxbiTQrGCjwe_n-jL63Y [5.1.2020].

Leung, Laifong. 2016. Contemporary Chinese Fiction Writers: Biography, Bibliography, and Critical Assessment. New York & London: Routledge.

Rudolph, Jodh. 2020. “Translation: Backlash To Wuhan Diary “Reveals A Serious Problem Society Must Correct.” China Digital Times, April 21 https://chinadigitaltimes.net/2020/04/translation-backlash-to-wuhan-diary-reveals-a-serious-problem-society-must-correct/ [5.2.2020].

Wu, Yuwen. 2020. “Chinese propagandists don’t want you to read this diary on the coronavirus lockdown in Wuhan.” The Independent, March 2 https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/coronavirus-wuhan-lockdown-fangfang-diary-china-dr-li-a9368961.html [3.2.2020].

Ying Jiang. 2012. Cyber-Nationalism in China: Challenging Western Media Portrayals of Internet Censorship in China. Adelaide: University of Adelaide Press.

Zhao, Kiki. 2020. “Opinion: The Coronavirus Story is Too Big for China to Spin.” The New York Times, Feb 14 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/14/opinion/china-coronavirus-social-media.html [5.2.2020].

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This text was written for Goethe-Institut China under a CC-BY-NC-ND-4.0-DE license (Creative Commons) as part of a monthly column in collaboration with What’s On Weibo.

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