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Woman Killed by Tiger – Badaling Wildlife Park Investigation Completed

Investigation of the incident where a woman was attacked by a tiger when she got out of the car at the Badaling Wildlife Park (八达岭动物园) in Beijing this summer has been completed.

Manya Koetse

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Investigation of the incident where a woman was attacked by a tiger when she got out of the car at the Badaling Wildlife Park (八达岭动物园) in Beijing this summer has been completed. It concludes that the wildlife park is not to blame.

On July 23, 2016, a visitor of the Badaling Wildlife Park in Beijing was attacked by a tiger when she got out of her car in the safari area of the zoo. When the woman was dragged away by the animal, her husband and mother also left the vehicle to come to her rescue.

The incident resulted in the death of the elder woman (Mrs. Zhou), while the younger woman (Mrs. Zhao) was left seriously injured.

News of the tragedy soon triggered discussions on Sina Weibo about the safety at Badaling Wildlife Park, a zoo where the director was killed by one of the elephants in March. In 2009 and 2014, two other persons were also attacked and killed by one of the zoo’s tigers. Many netizens wondered who was to blame for the fatal incident: was it the zoo or its visitors?

 

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Footage shows the woman leaving the car and being dragged away by a tiger on July 23.

 

The incident’s investigation team has now completed its report, of which the results were made public earlier today. The reports identifies the following reasons for causing the incident:

First, Mrs. Zhao did not comply with the Badaling Wildlife Park’s strict guidelines not to leave the car, which led to her being attacked and wounded by the tiger. Second, the woman who got out of the car to save her daughter (Mrs. Zhou) also did not follow the park’s rules that strictly prohibit anybody from exiting their vehicle, resulting in her death.

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The report states that before entering the park’s wildlife area, visitors are clearly informed of the park’s rules by the zoo’s staff and through leaflets. Those who drive into the wildlife park with their own car, like Mrs. Zhao, also have to sign a waiver of liability. The park has clear warning signs telling visitors not to exit their vehicle, and that park rangers will come to the rescue in case of an emergency.

The investigation team therefore concludes that the Badaling Wildlife Park bears no responsibility for what happened on July 23.

The fatal minutes on July 23

The report describes how the family, consisting of the woman Mrs. Zhao, her husband Mr. Liu, her mother Mrs. Zhou, and their 2-year-old infant, entered the park at around 14.00 on July 23rd. Before entering the premises, they were informed of the park rules, which, amongst others, state that visitors cannot leave their vehicles, feed the animals or open their car windows. They also signed the waiver.

At 15:00, Mrs. Zhao exited the car on the passenger side to change seats with her husband, who was driving the car. When park rangers saw her exiting the car, they honked to warn her to get back in the car. The two vehicles behind their car also honked to alert the woman, who was soon dragged away by the tiger who had come up behind her. Mrs. Zhou and Mr. Liu also left the vehicle to go after her. Park rangers immediately drove to the scene and asked for assistance. This whole scene took place within a time frame of less than half a minute.

The report also describes that at the scene, Mrs. Zhou tried to smack the tiger who attacked her daughter, when a second tiger approached and bit her in the back. When a third tiger approached and also attacked the older woman, she gave up her fight.

As two park patrol cars arrived at the scene, Mr. Liu asked the drivers to get out of their cars to help. In accordance with park rules, they ordered Mr. Liu to get in the car immediately and to leave the scene, which he did at 15.02. Within the 14 minutes that followed, park rangers restrained a total of ten tigers by leading them into cages and the tiger habitat so that they could safely exit their vehicles. By 15.16, they found that Mrs. Zhou no longer had a pulse, while Mrs. Zhao was still alive, although her face was severely mauled.

The two women were immediately brought to the hospital, where they arrived at 15.44. The 57-year-old Mrs. Zhou was officially pronounced dead at 17.12. The 32-year-old Mrs. Zhao could be rescued despite her severe injuries, and by now has been discharged from the hospital.

Although the report does not hold Badaling Wildlife Park liable for the incident, it does stress that the park needs to further increase the safety of visitors by strengthening awareness of the existing rules, and emphasizes that park rangers need further training on how to respond in the case of emergency.

On Weibo, the completed investigation results were soon shared amongst netizens, receiving thousands of comments within a couple of hours.

The majority of Chinese netizens seem to agree with the report’s outcome.
“The zoo nor the tigers are to blame!” they respond with smileys and happy emojis.

“It is so clear how this happened, did they really need such a long time to investigate?”, some commenters wonder. “The outcome is fair!”, is what many Weibo users say.

But not everybody agrees with the report. “Firstly, a wild life park should not be used for people’s entertainment,” one netizen says: “Secondly, if a mother sees her child being dragged away and exits the car to help her, can you still blame her for not following the rules?”

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Food & Drinks

Tianjin Restaurant Introduces “Meal Boxes for Women”

The special lunch boxes for women were introduced after female customers had too much leftover rice.

Manya Koetse

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China’s anti food waste campaign, that was launched earlier this month, is still in full swing and noticeable on China’s social media where new iniatives to curb the problem of food loss are discussed every single day.

Today, the hashtag “Tianjin Restaurant Launches Special Female Meal Boxes” (#天津一饭店推出女版盒饭#) went trending with some 130 million views on Weibo, with many discussions on the phenomenon of gender-specific portions. The restaurant claims its special ‘female lunch boxes’ are just “more suitable for women.”

According to Tonight News Paper (今晚报), the only difference their reporter found between the “meals for women” and the regular meals, is the amount of rice served. Instead of 275 grams of rice, the ‘female edition’ of the restaurant’s meals contain 225 grams of rice.

The restaurant, located on Shuangfeng Road, decided to introduce special female lunch boxes after discovering that the female diners of the offices they serve usually leave behind much more rice than their male customers.

The restaurant now claims they expect to save approximately 10,000 kilograms of rice on an annual basis by serving their meals based on gender.

On Chinese social media, the initiative was heavily criticized. Weibo netizens wondered why the restaurant would not just offer “bigger” and “smaller” lunch boxes instead of introducing special meals based on gender.

“There are also women who like to eat more, what’s so difficult about changing your meals to ‘big’ and ‘small’ size?”, a typical comment said: “Some women eat a lot, some men don’t.”

Many people called the special meals for women sex discrimination and also wanted to know if there was a difference in price between the ‘female’ and ‘male’ lunch boxes.

There are also female commenters on Weibo who claim they can eat much more than their male colleagues. “Just give me the male version,” one female user wrote: “I’ll eat that meal instead.”

This is the second time this month that initiatives launched in relation to China’s anti food waste campaign receive online backlash.

A restaurant in Changsha triggered a storm of criticism earlier this month after placing two scales at its entrance and asking customers to to enter their measurements into an app that would then suggest menu items based on their weight. The restaurant later apologized for encouraging diners to weigh themselves.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Local News

15-Year-Old Girl Jumps to Death in Sichuan, Kills Father Who Tried to Catch Her

The tragic incident has stirred a flood of comments on Weibo.

Manya Koetse

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After the shocking death of a 2-year-old boy went viral in China earlier today, another tragic story is again top trending on social media.

On August 22, authorities in the city of Luzhou in Sichuan stated that on Saturday morning 10:30 a 15-year-old girl jumped from the 25th floor of an apartment building.

The girl’s father, a 42-year-old man, attempted to catch his daughter and break her fall. Both father and daughter were killed in the incident.

The hashtag “Father killed while trying to catch daughter who jumped off a building” (#父亲欲接坠楼女儿被砸身亡#) received over 460 million views on Weibo on Saturday, with thousands of people discussing the tragic event.

Bystander footage of the scene shows (blurred, viewer discretion advised) how people are screaming in horror when the girl jumps to her death.

The case is currently still under investigation.

Among the flood of comments, there are many who are worried about the mother in this family and offer their condolences: “She must be in so much pain.”

Some also ponder over the terrible predicament of the girl’s father and a dad’s love for his daughter, writing things such as: “He just relied on his instincts to step forward and open his arms.”

There are also many people reflecting on the stress experienced by young people in China, school pressure being a major issue, leading to self-harm or suicide. According to a 2017 news report, suicide is the leading cause of death among young Chinese people.

“I can understand both the daughter and the father,” some say: “I can feel the pain in my heart.”

 

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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