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China Arts & Entertainment

Another Star in Prison: Chinese Celebrity Mo Zhang caught with drugs

Trending topic of July 31, 2014: Chinese actor Mo Zhang caught with drugs again. Award-winning actor Mo Zhang (张默), who is known for his roles in, amongst others, Let the Bullets Fly (让子弹飞) and Back to 1942 (一九四二), has been arrested in Beijing for possession of drugs.

Manya Koetse

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Trending on Sina Weibo on July 31, 2014: Chinese actor Mo Zhang caught with drugs again. Award-winning actor Mo Zhang (张默), who is known for his roles in, amongst others, Let the Bullets Fly (让子弹飞) and Back to 1942 (一九四二), has been arrested in Beijing for possession of drugs. Mo Zhang is the son of famous actor and producer Guoli Zhang, who also played in Back to 1942. 

On the morning of July 31st, a Weibo user who was later confirmed to be the editor of the South China Morning Post, announced that Zhang was detained for illegal drug use. The news was later confirmed by the Beijing police. This is the second time the actor is arrested for drug use; he was arrested in 2012 for the possession of marijuana. His father Guoli Zhang gave an official statement at the time, expressing his grief over his son’s drug use and conveying his support for the Beijing police in their fight against illegal substances. Mo Zhang was detained for 13 days. It has not yet been reported how long the actor will be incarcerated this time.

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The arrest of Mo Zhang sparked the amusement of many microbloggers who could add another name to the list of recently imprisoned celebrities. Since the 2014 arrests of  Li Daimo, Huang Haibo, Ning Caishen, Zhang Yuan, Zhang Yaoyuan, Guo Meimei and He Shengdong (see list below), netizens have spoofed the famous 1987 action-movie Prison on Fire (监狱风云): instead of the original movie poster, the movie is now jokingly starring all imprisoned stars such as Zhang Yaoyang and Guo Meimei, with the main lead for Huang Haibo and Ning Caishen.

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List of Chinese celebrities who have been arrested in 2014:

Singer 李代沫 Li Daimo, arrested in March 2014 for possession of drugs.

Actor and singer 黄海波 Huang Haibo, arrested in May 2014 for visiting a prostitute.

Playwright 宁财神 Ning Caishen, arrested in June 2014 for possession of drugs.

Director 张元 Zhang Yuan, arrested in June 2014 for possession of drugs.

Hong-Kong actor and model 张耀扬 Zhang Yaoyang arrested in July 2014 for possession of drugs and visiting a prostitute.

Social media celebrity 郭美美 Guo Meimei, arrested in July 2014 for illegal gambling (see our article about this incident).

Actor 何盛东 He Shengdong, arrested in July 2014 for possession of drugs.

 

– by Manya Koetse

 

[box] This is Weiblog: the What’s on Weibo blog section. Short daily updates on what is currently trending on China’s biggest social medium, Sina Weibo.[/box]

 

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Celebs

Iconic Shanghai Singer Yao Lee Passes Away at the Age of 96

Yao Li, one of the seven great singing stars of Shanghai in the 1940s, has passed away.

Manya Koetse

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Chinese singer Yao Lee (姚莉), the ‘Queen of Mandarin pop,’ passed away on July 19 at the age of 96.

The singer, with her ‘Silvery Voice,’ was known as one of the seven great singing stars (“七大歌星”) of Shanghai of the 1940s.

For those who may not know her name, you might know her music – one of her iconic songs was used in the hit movie Crazy Rich Asians.

Yao’s most famous songs include “Rose, Rose, I Love You” (玫瑰玫瑰我爱你), “Meet Again” (重逢), and “Love That I Can’t Have” (得不到的爱情).

Yao, born in Shanghai in 1922, started singing at the age of 13. Her brother Yao Min was a popular music songwriter.

When popular music was banned under Mao in the 1950s, Hong Kong became a new center of the Mandarin music industry, and Yao continued her career there.

On Weibo, the hashtag Yao Lee Passes Away (#姚莉去世#) already received more than 200 million views at time of writing.

Many Chinese netizens post candles to mourn the death of the popular singer, some call her passing “the end of an era.”

“Shanghai of those years is really where it all started,” others say.

Listen to one of Yao’s songs below:

By Manya Koetse

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China Comic & Games

“Darkest Day in the History of Animation”: Kyoto Animation Arson Attack Trending on Weibo

The devastating arson attack at Kyoto Animation has shocked Chinese anime fans.

Wendy Huang

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Chinese anime fans are mourning the shocking arson attack on the Kyoto Animation Studio.

An arson attack has left at least 33 people dead and dozens injured at the Kyoto Animation Studio. The attack, that occurred on the morning of July 18, has shocked anime fans in China.

Approximately 70 people were inside the three-story Kyoto building when multiple fires broke out around 10:30 in the morning (local time).

As reported by BBC, a 41-year-old suspect broke into the Kyoto Animation studio on Thursday morning and sprayed petrol before igniting it.

The man reportedly shouted ‘go die’ when bursting into the studio. The suspect was injured and taken to a hospital for treatment. The case is currently under investigation.

Image of suspect given out by Japanese media.

On Chinese social media, the Kyoto Animation Studio (also known as ‘KyoAni’) went trending on Thursday.

Many Chinese anime fans offered their prayers to those who lost lives or faced injury at the deadly attack and expressed anger at the arsonist. Others initiated the setup of donation channel to support the Kyoto Animation studio and the families of the victims.

On Weibo, popular literary blogger ‘Guo Maimai’ (@知书少年果麦麦) published a long post about the Kyoto Animation’s work as an independent studio, commenting: “This is the darkest day in the history of animation.”

He further added: “The gravest consequence of this fire is not the loss of the original works or the building, but the loss of the talents who have been trained for such a long time.” 

At time of writing, the post was reposted nearly 60,000 times, receiving over 7000 comments. The hashtag “Darkest Day in Japan’s Animation” (#日本动画最黑暗的一天#) also took off afterward.

Chinese cartoonist ‘Feizhaizhi’ (@我是肥志, 2.66 million followers) wrote: “All the original works have been destroyed! All their efforts, their dreams, and now even their lives are gone!”

To express his grief, the cartoonist changed his Weibo profile into a gray one.

Bilibili, China’s leading online platform to distribute Japanese anime, also changed its anime website to grey.

The Kyoto Animation company was established in 1981 and has produced anime ever since (‘anime’ refers to a style of Japanese film and television animation typically targeted at adults as well as kids).

KyoAni’s high-quality animations, including TV series and films, are known for often featuring highschool girls and becoming big hits.

From ‘The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya,’ Kyoto Animation

Japanese comics and animations have been hugely popular in China since the 1990s. Even today, Japanese productions are usually more popular among Chinese anime fans than domestically produced works (read more).

Despite the outpouring of support for the Kyoto Animation studio, some Weibo netizens did not show sympathy and made anti-Japanese comments in light of the history of the Sino-Japanese war.

Others, however, would not accept such comments in these tragic times, writing: “Kyoto Animation has been such a good companion during our childhood..Why can’t we support the companion of our childhood?”

Another person wrote: “I will never forget the history, just like I will never forget the memories of my childhood created by Kyodo Animation.”

By Wendy Huang

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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