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China Memes & Viral

“America’s Great Savior” – Communist Mao Song Turned Into Donald Trump Meme

A Donald Trump meme song has been making its rounds on Chinese social media. The song, originally a communist song praising Mao Zedong, hails Trump as “America’s great savior.”

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A Donald Trump meme song has been making its rounds on Chinese social media. The song, originally a communist song praising Mao Zedong, hails Trump as “America’s great savior.”

A video clip titled “Great Leader Trump” (伟大领袖川普唐), originally posted on Chinese video sharing site ACFUN, is making its rounds on Chinese social media.

The video, as featured by What’s on Weibo, is an adaptation of China’s famous communist song “The East is Red” (东方红) about Mao Zedong.

The original song goes:

The East is Red 东方红
The sun is rising 太阳升
From China comes Mao Zedong 中国出了个毛泽东
He strives for people’s happiness 他为人民谋幸福
Hurrah
He’s the savior of the people! 他是人民大救星

And the Trump version goes:

The general election 美利坚
Is approaching 要大选
From New York arises Donald Trump 纽约出了个川普唐
He strives for the voter’s happiness 他为选民谋幸福
You are fired
He’s the great America great savior! 他是美帝大救星

[literally: “He is the great savior of the American imperialists.”]

trump

Although Trump is known for talking negatively about China draining American jobs and money, many Chinese netizens a have taken a liking to the presidential candidate. Trump fans have created numerous ‘Trump’ accounts on Sina Weibo.

Check out the video here:


Trump Video Goes Viral on Chinese Social Media bywhatsonweibo

– By Manya Koetse and Diandian Guo
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©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Erin Musko

    November 5, 2016 at 2:28 pm

    Binfer is simply the easiest way to send large videos. Another nice option to send big videos.

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China Memes & Viral

How a Boy Duped by Hair Salon Became the 2018 Internet Sensation

The footage of the awkwardly smiling and disillusioned teenager unravelled an endless stream of memes. Little did the teenager know that a few weeks after the incident, he would be the face of advertisement campaigns all over the country.

Gabi Verberg

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What was supposed to be a quick visit to the hairdresser turned into a disaster when the 18-year-old Wu Zhengqiang (吴正强) was presented with a 40,000 yuan ($5795) bill and a bad haircut. For Chinese social media users, the story became a source of countless memes this year.

Looking back at Chinese social media in 2018, one unexpected internet celebrity is at the center of one of the most meme-worthy stories of the year, reaching over 470 million views on Weibo.

It all started earlier this year, when Wu Zhengqiang (吴正强), an 18-year-old teenager, walked into a salon in Hangzhou to get himself a haircut. It looked like it was going to be a great day when he was offered a special hair and skin treatment for “free” – until the bill came.

Before the treatment was finished, the boy was surrounded by several people and was presented with a paper he was asked to sign. Only after the treatment was finished, Wu found out that he had given his approval to a staggering bill of 39,600 yuan ($5756).

Wu, who only makes a little less than 3000 yuan a month ($435) as a real estate agent, was not willing to pay the bill. When the salon employees refused to let him pay 480 yuan ($70), the original price on their price-list, Wu reported the incident to the police. In the end, Wu paid the shop a total of 2500 yuan ($363) instead.

But as time passed, Wu got increasingly annoyed about the whole incident. Not only did he feel robbed of his money, he also found his freshly plucked eyebrows looking even worse than before the treatment. So, he reached out to a local Hangzhou tv station to share his grievances (footage below).

The interview soon attracted the attention on Chinese social media, where most commenters did not focus on the story of the struggling teenager, but instead focused on Wu’s strangely shaved-up hairline, his thick characteristic eyebrows, the disillusion in his eyes, and his nervous smile – it all turned out the be the perfect ingredients for an endless stream of funny memes.

The hashtag “Hairline-boy expressions” received over 470 million views on Weibo, featuring many memes in which people captured feelings such as “I feel terrible wronged,” “Smile gradually disappearing,” “I’m puzzled,” and “Excuse me.”

But the popularity of the teenager reached further than just netizens using his face for memes; Wu soon appeared on several tv-shows including one of China’s most popular variety shows Happy Camp. He also starred in several commercials, making his face well-recognized all over the country.

Also, Wu’s personal Weibo account received thousands of new fans in his rise to fame. At time of writing, his Weibo page reached little over 400,000 followers.

How Wu’s career will further develop is hard to say. However, when Wu is asked what he will do when his popularity has faded away, he coolly answers: “I’ll just work.”

By Gabi Verberg

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Memes & Viral

Love at First Sight? Man Attempts to Sue Woman after Instant Crush at Beijing Bookstore

After waiting for 50 days to see her again, the man decided to sue a woman he met at a bookstore to trace her down.

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Every now and then, romantic trending stories pop up on Chinese social media in which people try to reconnect with people they’ve met. But the story of Mr. Sun, who tried to find the girl he met in a bookstore by suing her, has caused unease among netizens.

When a man named Sun saw a young woman during a visit to the Wangfujing bookstore in Beijing, it was love at first sight for him.

He first saw the woman in the afternoon of September 24th in the well-known bookstore, where she was wearing a yellow hoodie and “skin-colored stockings.” The two allegedly had prolonged eye contact, which is when he realized he had a special connection with her, according to Chinese news platform Pear Beijing.

Within no time, he lost sight of the girl, and was not able to find her again. Without knowing her name, age, or other details, the search for the woman was virtually impossible.

But Sun was reportedly so desperate to see the young lady again, that he went back to the store in the fifty following days to wait for her. Since the man went to the bookstore instead of to work, he had to borrow money from friends and family to sustain a living.

According to Chinese media, Sun has waited in the store all those days from 11 in the morning to 7 in the evening.

On December 10th, the man went down to the local Dongcheng courthouse in order to sue the woman, hoping to find her through the legal system.

According to the petition for appeal, the man sought to sue the woman for emotional distress. By tracing her down through the legal system, he further hoped to get some answers that would “solve his mental anguish.”

The Dongcheng courthouse, however, has advised the man not to sue the woman, and his case was not accepted. Sun now says he will think of another way to find the woman – whom he thinks might be the love of his life, – telling reporters that he will “figure out other ways if the normal way is not working.”

On Weibo, Sun’s case has received a lot of attention today. One Toutiao News post dedicated to the story received almost 30,000 shares and over 40,000 comments at the time of writing.

More than 170 million people have now viewed the Weibo hastag “Man Attempts to Sue the Person He’s Looking for” (#男子欲起诉寻人#).

Many netizens think there is nothing romantic about this story. Instead, they label Sun as a “maniac” and are worried about the safety of the girl if he were to find her. One Weibo user writes: “This is sexual harassment, not LOVE. He is a stalker, and totally has no respect for the girl. The girl should stay far away from him.”

Others suggest that reporters should find out more about the man and his situation. In the papers he prepared for court, which were readable in the Pear Video report of the case, he wrote down that he “possibly lost the love of life, as well as the meaning of life,” leading to some worrying about the man’s mental well-being.

In 2016, another bizarre love story also went trending on Chinese social media, involving a Dutchman who waited for over ten days at Changsha airport in hopes of meeting his online Chinese girlfriend – who failed to show up. After eating nothing but instant noodles and sleeping on airport benches, the man was even admitted to the local hospital due to physical exhaustion.

The Dutchman waited ten days for his “online girlfriend” to show up.

For that Dutchman, the story unexpectedly took a happy turn when it was widely reported in Chinese media. It turned out that due to poor communication, the ‘online girlfriend’ did not know the Dutchman was waiting for her, and still wished to pursue a romantic relationship with him.

As for Sun, if it were up to the people in the social media comments sections, he will never find his “true love” again. “Girl, if you see this Weibo post, please remember how this guy looks, and stay far, far away from him,” one popular blogger writes.

By Manya Koetse and Wendy Huang

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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