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The New Superman is Chinese

A new Superman comic book series by DC Comics is coming out. No Clark Kent this time, but teenager Kenji Kong – a young Chinese superhero with a Japanese name.

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A new Superman comic book series by DC Comics is coming out. No Clark Kent this time, but teenager Kenji Kong – a young Chinese superhero with a Japanese name.

It is no secret that the superhero DC and Marvel comic book universes are not as ethnically diverse as the real world. There have been few well-known Chinese protagonists in the superhero cosmos. At the moment, most of the Chinese characters found in the DC and Marvel comics universe are either a supervillain or a supporting character. For many comic book readers, the most memorable Chinese character in the comic book universe is the Chinese supervillain Mandarin from Iron Man.

The comic book universe generally lacks characters with a Chinese background, or Asian characters at large. But over the past decade, the comic book world has been creating more characters that would be more appealing to Chinese audiences. In 2006, DC made their way into the hearts of Chinese comic book readers with the fourth super-hero Atom, hero Ryan Choi of Hong Kong origin. Unfortunately, Ryan Choi only appeared in 78 issues before being erased from the DC universe by assassin Deathstroke.

ryanchoiSuperhero Ryan Choi is from Hong Kong.

Hoping to attract a larger fan base within China, DC seems to have taken an even bolder step by giving the mantel of “Superman” to a Chinese teenager. A Chinese Superman with a name that sounds more Japanese than Chinese.

According to NBC News, DC recently announced a new comic series called New Superman at WonderCon 2016. DC Comics tweeted about the upcoming comic series on March 29. It will be written by Chinese-American Gene Luen Yang (杨谨伦) and illustrated by Victor Bodganovich.

Yang is famous for writing the award-winning 2006 graphic novel “American Born Chinese”.He went on to pen many other well-known graphic novels including Level UpBoxer and Saints and Avatar: The Last Airbender. More recently, Yang wrote the last 10 issues of Superman.

The story in New Superman will be about a 17 year-old teenager named Kenji Kong (孔恳记). The story of Kenji Kong will be different from that of Clark Kent, the original Superman. Unlike Clark Kent, Kenji is born on Earth with no superpowers, but then inherits Superman’s powers when he is a teenager. Another big difference is that New Superman will take place in the real city of modern-day Shanghai.

According to South China Morning Post, Yang has stated that Kenji will “start off as a jerk”, but then matures as his new-found superpowers affect him both physically and emotionally.

DC has not made it clear if Kenji Kong is intended to appeal to Chinese audiences. The introduction of a Chinese Superman can be seen as part of an ongoing movement in the comic book industry that sees to create more multi-cultural superheroes. The newest incarnation of the Incredible Hulk, for example, is of Korean descent.

There has already been some scrutiny over New Superman on social media sites and discussion boards around the web. “I love this. But why is a guy from Shanghai named Kenji? It’s a Japanese name,” commented @YuanSerenaP on Yang’s Twitter account.

“Does he understand China? He’s not afraid of being criticized?” one other netizen said on Sina Weibo.

The first issue of New Superman is set to be released on July 13, so there is still time for Yang to make some improvements. Let’s just hope that Kenji Kong will be just as awesome as the original Chinese SupermanSuper Inframan (中国超人).

sprman1975 movie on kung-fu superhero Super Inframan

By Chi Wen

Images:
– featured image tweeted by DC Comics.
Hong Kong hero Ryan Choi

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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Chi Wen is a freelance translator and writer who lives in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Besides translating and writing, he also teaches English as a Second Language to high school students. Chi is a self-proclaimed geek with a love for video games.

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    Guest

    April 8, 2016 at 9:52 pm

    Not sure what’s the focus. “Kenji” isn’t used here as a given name, so the Japanese association is invalid. Instead, it is clearly used as an Anglicized forename, eg. “Sherlock” Holmes, “Homer” Simpson, “Remington” Steele, etc. In fact, it’s already a relatively familiar choice among overseas Chinese: 3 Taiwanese celebs (吳克群, 陈子胤, 林学楷) adopted it; ditto some Hong Kong commoners I’ve come across. There is even a fairly well-known hairstylist duo in Singapore called Benji & Kenji. If they want, DC comics can profile “Kenji Kong” as, say, a 21st-century Westernized descendant of Confucius (Kongfuzi).

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China Celebs

Chinese Actor Zhao Lixin Banned from Weibo over Comments on Second Sino-Japanese War

The actor was banned for “downplaying” the Japanese aggression in China during the Second Sino-Japanese War.

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Sina Weibo issued a statement on April 16 that the Weibo account of the Chinese-Swedish actor Zhao Lixin has been terminated following remarks he made about Japan’s invasion of China and the Second Sino-Japanese War.

The Weibo account of Zhao Lixin (赵立新, 1968) has been closed after the Chinese-Swedish actor made controversial comments on the Second Sino-Japanese War.

On April 2nd, Zhao Lixin, who had more than 7 million followers, posted a message on Weibo that questioned why the Japanese military did not pillage and destroy the Beijing Palace Museum during the Second Sino-Japanese War:

The Japanese occupied Beijing for eight years. Why didn’t they steal relics from the Palace Museum and burn it down [during that time]? Is this in line with the nature of an invader?

The actor also commented on the Nanjing Massacre of 1937, suggesting that it was a consequence of Chinese resistance to the Japanese invasion.

Zhao’s post led to much controversy in early April, followed by a lengthy apology statement from the actor on April 3rd, in which he said he did not phrase his comments carefully enough and that he was remorseful over the storm of criticism he had ignited. His controversial Weibo post was soon taken offline.

Many people were mostly angered because they felt Zhao’s comments “defended” the Japanese invaders. “Zhao’s permit to work in China should be terminated forever!”, some commenters posted on Weibo.

The Second Sino-Japanese War is still a highly sensitive topic in China today, with anti-Japanese sentiments often flaring up when Japan-related topics go trending on Chinese social media.

The ‘Nanjing massacre’ or ‘Rape of Nanjing’ is an especially sensitive topic within the history of the Second Sino-Japanese War, also because some Japanese politicians and scholars consistently deny it even happened, heightening the tension between the two countries. For a Chinese celebrity to seemingly ‘downplay’ the aggression and atrocities committed by Japanese invaders in the 1937-1945 period is therefore highly controversial.

Despite Zhao’s apologies, Sina Weibo issued a notice on April 16 “Relating to Harmful Political Information” (关于时政有害信息的处理公告), stating that the account of Zhao Lixin, along with some others, had been closed for spreading this kind of information.

The hashtag relating to Zhao’s social media suspension received more than 57 million views on Weibo today.

“It’s good that his account was taken down,” a popular comment said: “It’s insulting our country.” Others said that Zhao should not have posted something that is “out of line” “considering his position as an actor.”

Zhao Lixin is mainly known for his roles in TV dramas such as The Legend of Mi Yue, Memoirs In China, and In the Silence.

Zhao is not the first KOL (Key Opinion Leader) to have been banned from Weibo after making controversial remarks relating to China’s history. In 2016 the famous entrepreneur Ren Zhiqiang disappeared from Weibo after publishing various posts on his experience with communism in the past, and the status quo of media in China.

By Manya Koetse , with contributions from Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Chinese TV Dramas

Catharsis on Taobao? Chinese ‘All is Well’ TV Drama Fans Are Paying Up to Scold the ‘Su Family Villains’

Some netizens are getting too worked up over this hit TV drama.

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Chinese TV drama ‘All is Well’ is such an online hit, that the collective despise for the fictional villains in the story is getting all too real. The show itself, along with an online service to scold its characters, has become a trending topic on Chinese social media this week.

The Chinese TV series All is Well (都挺好) is such a success that some people would even pay to scold the drama’s main ‘villains.’ One Taobao seller had nearly one thousand customers paying a fee this week for a special service to curse the characters they despise so much.

All is Well is a 46-episode urban TV drama that premiered on March 1st of this year on Zhejiang and Jiangsu Television. The series is based on the novel by A’nai (阿耐), who is also known for writing the super popular Ode to Joy TV drama.

All is Well tells the story of white-collar worker Su Mingyu and the conflicts within her family. The role of this daughter is played by Chinese actress Yao Chen (姚晨), one of the most popular celebrities on Weibo.

Yao Chen in All is Well.

As the only daughter, Su Mingyu is the black sheep of the family and grows up feeling lonely and unloved. When her mother suddenly passes away, the Su family falls apart. The father becomes selfish and overbearing, while her brothers are also unsuccessful in keeping the family together.

The three men within the Su family have become much-hated characters on Chinese social media for their selfishness and manipulative traits. Su Mingcheng (Li Junting) is Mingyu’s older brother, Su Mingzhe (Gao Xin) is her younger brother, and Su Daqiang (Ni Dahong) is her father.

While the TV drama is a major hit, many fans seem to take pleasure in scolding the main characters. On Weibo, some netizens are changing their names into some of the Su villains, allowing others to scold them.

But there are also people who have turned the collective contempt for the Su men into a small business. On e-commerce site Taobao, one seller set up a service to “curse the Su family father and sons” (怒骂苏家三父子), charging a 0.5 yuan fee, Caijing reports.

Various Chinese media report that the seller has had at least 300 customers over the past week who could “vent their anger” about the drama’s characters. The seller would open a chat window, displaying the photo and name of one of the three despised characters, and pretending to be them. He also displays a counter that shows how many times the characters have been scolded by customers.

Other news sites report that there are at least 40 online shops selling this ‘scolding service’ to customers, with one seller allegedly serving nearly 1000 customers in one day.

The topic, under the hashtag “Online Shop Sells Service to Scold the Su Father and Sons” (#网店出售怒骂苏家三父子服务#), received nearly 100 million views on Weibo this week.

Many netizens are surprised and amused that their favorite TV drama has turned into a business opportunity for Taobao sellers. “I’m a shop seller,” one commenter says: “I give all the money to charity. I work during the day, but in the evenings I’m here for all of you!”

“Is this the rival of the Kua Kua group?”, one commenter wonders. Kua Kua groups, as we recently explained in this article, are online chat groups where people can be complimented or praised, sometimes for money. The current scolding groups, in a way, serve a similar purpose: offering netizens a way to vent their feelings and feel a bit better.

Although the cursing may provide emotional catharsis for some, others just find it really funny. “How about you give me one yuan, and I scold you?”, one commenter suggests: “It’s crazy that these type of services exist.”

All is Well can be viewed through iQiyi (without English subtitles, regional restrictions apply – VPN).

Also see:

By Manya Koetse 

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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