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Here’s RoboCop! China Now Has Its First Police Robot

China’s very first police robot made its debut at Zhengzhou Station this week. The robot, that has a face recognition system, can help the police to catch fugitives and answers questions from passengers.

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China’s very first police robot made its debut at Zhengzhou Station this week. The robot, that has a face recognition system, can help the police to catch fugitives and answers questions from passengers.

On February 17, China’s first-ever police robot made its debut at Zhengzhou’s rail station.

The robot can move around by itself, and through its face recognition system, it can assist the police in recognizing fugitives. It can also interact with people and answer their questions. Additionally it measures the air temperature and can warn people in case of fire or other calamity.

News of the robot’s appearance was published by different official Chinese media outlets, from Xinhua News to China Youth Daily.

China has increased its spending on robots for years, and is also increasingly profiling itself as a robot nation. The China Machinery Industry Federation aims for China to be one of the world’s most intensively automated nations by 2020.

“Where is his laser gun?”, some people on Weibo wondered.

– By Manya Koetse
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©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Digital

Chinese iPhone Users Flooded with Spam through iMessage

Since Apple handed over their iCould operations in China to the Chinese Guizhou-Cloud Big Data company, iPhone users are bombarded with trash ads in iMessage.

Ryan Gandolfo

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Intrusive advertisements, ranging from gambling promotions to non-solicited pornography, are flooding Chinese iPhones. Many users have had enough of them, and are looking for solutions.

The problem of spam ads is a universal one, but for iPhone users in China, they are especially bombarded with spam through iMessage.

Recently, several Chinese media outlets, including CCTV, have published articles and videos about Apple’s iMessage ‘trash’ messages flooding into Chinese iPhone users’ inbox. These messages contain various kinds of advertising, most of which are illicit.

A common junk ad in iMessage. The sender’s address is an email address with a combination of random numbers and letters. Source: CCTV news

The spam problem has also been a topic of debate on social media this week, where thousands of commenters complain about receiving loads of different ‘trash’ messages, primarily about gambling, purchasing agents, and sexual solicitation.

Even though iPhone users report and delete the messages, new ones keep on flooding in – and there seemingly is no solution for the issue yet.

Chinese media report that there is a rise in companies focusing on spam advertising. They build on massive iMessage user databases to send out ads to specific user groups based on their demographics, gender, age, sex, etc.

Cartoon comparing junk iMessage ads to mosquitos. Source: CCTV news.

The problem of Apple’s illicit spam adds to US-China tensions because of the trade war, with state media accusing Apple for failing to solve the problem.

While Chinese media outlets seem to be pointing fingers at Apple, many Weibo users are blaming the new company responsible for Apple’s iCloud services in mainland China, namely Guizhou-Cloud Big Data (云上贵州公司).

In February of this year, Apple handed over their iCould operations in China to a Chinese company to comply with government policies that require Chinese citizens’ data to be held within the country.

One user comments: “We didn’t have this [problem] before. Only after Guizhou-Cloud took over did it occur. Classic China.”

Another Weibo user wrote: “Wake up everyone! State enterprise Guizhou-Cloud is responsible for iCloud, and is selling user data on the black market. Why would you now blame Apple for this problem???”

For the many iPhone users searching for a quick fix to the annoying spam problem, Weibo account Digital Tail (@数字尾巴) offers a simple solution: “If you only use your message center to receive phone verifications and notifications, then you might as well just turn iMessage off.”

On August 2nd, Cult of Mac reported that Apple is now working with Chinese telecoms firms to find a way to reduce the flood of spam in iMessage.

Some Weibo commenters, however, think there are more important things to deal with first: “Solve the spam ads on Weibo, first,” they write: “They’re more intrusive anyway than those on iPhone.”

By Ryan Gandolfo

This article has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Digital

Chinese Online News Outlet Q Daily Shut Down

The shutdown of ‘Curious Daily’ aka Q Daily is making people more curious..

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The sudden suspension of news site Q Daily has attracted the attention of Chinese netizens.

As of Friday, August 3rd, the Chinese news outlet Q Daily (好奇心日报) has been shut down. Since the afternoon (Beijing time), visits to www.qdaily.com were redirected to a statement, saying:

“Facing our problems and earnest rectifications –

Q Daily has violated the news information regulations and has damaged the order of online information dissemination. In doing so, we violated the China Internet Security Law, the Administrative Measures for Internet Information Service, the Provisions for the Administration of Internet News Information Services, and other related stipulations. We will strictly implement the requirements of the regulatory authorities. From 15:00 pm on August 3 to 15:00 pm on September 2, we will [therefore] suspend all updates of the Q Daily platform and carry out comprehensive and thorough rectification.”

Shortly after the sudden shutdown, Chinese state media outlet SHINE, previously Shanghai Daily, reported that Q Daily had been shutdown for “illegally reporting and forwarding news,” “without obtaining the required qualifications to run an Internet news service.”

Other Chinese state media outlets, including China.org, also confirmed that the reason for the site’s suspension related to “long-term unauthorized engagement in Internet news information services.”

Q Daily, literally “Curious Daily,” is a privately-held online media site that has been running since April of 2014.

According to the Q Daily profile, the “light and web-native” news site is managed by Executive Editor Xianfeng Yi (伊险峰), who also founded the popular Chinese business magazine CBNweekly magazine.

At time of writing, the Weibo account of Q Daily @好奇心日报 is still online. Its latest released news articles, as posted on its account, mostly relate to foreign business news topics, such as the recent Heineken deal in China or the Starbucks opening in Italy.

The site’s shutdown received quite some attention on Chinese social media today – some threads receiving hundreds of shares and comments. “Socialism with Chinese characteristics is just putting news in a cage,” some commented: “All the news sources I like are being shut down.”

Many wondered about the exact reasons behind the suspension, jokingly saying: “It makes me even more curious..[to know why Curious Daily was suspended].” Others said: “We’re just not supposed to be curious.”

By Manya Koetse, with contribution from Diandian Guo.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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