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Nude Pics for a ‘Naked Loan’: Controversial Online Loaning in China

A recent leak has exposed a raunchy Chinese e-commerce scandal in which women get personal online loans through nude pictures and videos. According to some netizens, the ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon is a sign of the consumerism of China’s younger generation.

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A recent leak has exposed a raunchy Chinese e-commerce scandal in which women get personal online loans through nude pictures and videos. According to some netizens, the ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon is a sign of the consumerism of China’s younger generation.

The so-called ‘Naked Loan’ is a practice of online money borrowing and lending where female loaners are allowed to use their ‘body’ instead of financial records as collateral.

The recent leak in China of at least 10 gigabytes of naked pictures and videos for ‘naked loans’ on Jiedaibao (借贷宝), a Chinese online peer-to-peer lending platform, has made yet another e-commerce scandal after the recent controversies over Alipay.

“Sometimes loaners propose a ‘flesh payback’ for which borrowers will repay their loans with sexual activities.”

The “naked” in “naked loan” (luǒdài 裸贷), is a pun: on the one hand, it means that no proof of capital or material assets is required when taking the loan; on the other hand, the naked female body is taken instead as a guarantee when borrowing money.

To get a naked loan, borrowers take naked selfies in which their ID cards have to be held in front of them. Both the front and back side of the ID card should be clearly readable. The borrowers also have to make a video (in which they also have to be naked), stating their name, the loaner’s name, the amount of the loan and interest, the date of payback, and the promise that in case they are not able to pay back the loan, they will have to “face the consequences.”

In the case of a delayed payback, loaners will threaten to release the borrowers’ naked pictures on the internet, or to expose their conduct to their parents and family. Sometimes loaners also propose a “flesh payback” (肉偿), for which borrowers will repay their loan with sexual activities.

What draws the public’s attention to the “naked loan” phenomenon is the recent leak of 10 gigabytes of documents from Jiedaibao (借贷宝), a Chinese online borrowing and lending platform. The documents concern private information of users, including naked pictures and videos of 161 borrowers. The borrowers are female netizens between the age of 17-23, many of them attending university or college.

Soon after the leak of these documents, Jiedaibao announced on its official Weibo account that they would take legal action to combat ‘naked loan’ practices and that they would set up a one-million ‘anti-naked fund’ to resolve the situation.

“The ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon reveals the problem of modern youth; that their expanding desire for material wealth is increasingly incompatible with their real life situations.”

The issue also attracted the attention of official media. State media outlets such as People’s Daily (人民网) have called for better supervision over China’s online e-commerce platforms.

On Sina Weibo, netizens are also concerned about young women’s motives to take a naked loan. Many believe that university students are influenced by “consumerism”, that triggers young people to make extra money to purchase expensive cosmetics and accessories.

As one popular Weibo user writes: “The ‘Naked Loan’ [phenomenon] reveals the problem of modern youth; that their expanding desire for material wealth is increasingly incompatible with their real life situations (..) the life of “lower people” is ugly and undesirable; a decent and well-off life has become the norm.”

Another netizen is more apathetic about China’s young “spenders”: “Excessive consumption has become quite common among university students, yet society is neither understanding nor responding to such needs. Under an unsound credit system, young people fall victim to these ‘naked loans’.”

-By Diandian Guo
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©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Diandian Guo is a China-born Master student of transdisciplinary and global society, politics & culture at the University of Groningen with a special interest for new media in China. She has a BA in International Relations from Beijing Foreign Language University, and is specialized in China's cultural memory.

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China Comic & Games

China’s Latest Online Viral Game Makes You Clap for Xi Jinping

Smart propaganda – now clapping for Xi Jinping has become a competition.

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In a new online game that has come out during the 19th National Congress in Beijing, Chinese netizens can compete in applauding for Xi Jinping. The game has become an online hit.

The major 19th CPC National Congress started on Wednesday in Beijing with a speech by Chinese President Xi Jinping that took nearly 3,5 hours.

The speech, that focused on China’s future and its rise in the world today, was repeatedly paused for the appropriate applause from the party members in the audience.

With the introduction of a new game by Tencent, people can now also clap along to Xi Jinping’s speech from their own living room. The game became an online hit on October 18. It was already played over 400 million times by 9 pm Beijing time.

The mobile game can be opened through a link that takes you to a short segment of the lengthy speech by Xi Jinping. In the short segment, President Xi mentions that it is the mission of the Communist Party of China to strive for the happiness and the rise of the Chinese people.

The app then allows you “clap” for Xi by tapping the screen of your phone as many times as you can within a time frame of 18 seconds. After completing, you can invite your friends to play along and compete with them.

The game has become especially popular on WeChat, where some users boast that they have scored a ‘clap rate’ of 1695.

If you’re up to it, you can try to clap as much as you can for Xi Jinping here.

By Manya Koetse and Diandian Guo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Digital

This Digital Device Now Helps Chinese Police Catch Traffic Violators

After RoboCop, here’s Guardrail Drone: this high-tech device makes it easier and safer for Chinese police to catch traffic violators.

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A new digital device makes it easier and safer for Chinese police to catch traffic violators. A local experiment with the police gadget proved successful earlier this year.

From now on, it might no longer be the police that warns drivers to drive slowly through construction zones or to get off the emergency lane. A new digital device can now help Chinese traffic police to send out warnings or to catch people violating traffic rules.

The automated device can be placed on the guardrail and is directly connected to the smartphone of the police officer controlling it. Through the camera on the device, the police can see when someone is driving on the emergency lane and can send out police warning signs and sounds through the speakers on the device.

On Chinese social media, a video on how the device works has been making its rounds over the past few days. Some netizens say the new device is just “awesome,” and others warn drivers not to use the traffic lane; the chances of getting caught are now bigger because of the police’s new helper.

The device was first successfully tested locally in May of this year at a Zhejiang Expressway, NetEase’s Huang Weicheng (黄唯诚) reported in July of this year.

Earlier in 2017, police also experimented with a new police robot, jokingly called ‘Robocop’ by netizens, to help police catching fugitives and answer questions from people at the train station.

In our latest Weivlog we will tell you all about this ‘guardrail drone’; how it works and where it has been implemented:

By Manya Koetse

NB: Please attribute What’s on Weibo when quoting from this article.
Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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