Connect with us

China Digital

Nude Pics for a ‘Naked Loan’: Controversial Online Loaning in China

A recent leak has exposed a raunchy Chinese e-commerce scandal in which women get personal online loans through nude pictures and videos. According to some netizens, the ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon is a sign of the consumerism of China’s younger generation.

Published on

A recent leak has exposed a raunchy Chinese e-commerce scandal in which women get personal online loans through nude pictures and videos. According to some netizens, the ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon is a sign of the consumerism of China’s younger generation.

The so-called ‘Naked Loan’ is a practice of online money borrowing and lending where female loaners are allowed to use their ‘body’ instead of financial records as collateral.

The recent leak in China of at least 10 gigabytes of naked pictures and videos for ‘naked loans’ on Jiedaibao (借贷宝), a Chinese online peer-to-peer lending platform, has made yet another e-commerce scandal after the recent controversies over Alipay.

“Sometimes loaners propose a ‘flesh payback’ for which borrowers will repay their loans with sexual activities.”

The “naked” in “naked loan” (luǒdài 裸贷), is a pun: on the one hand, it means that no proof of capital or material assets is required when taking the loan; on the other hand, the naked female body is taken instead as a guarantee when borrowing money.

To get a naked loan, borrowers take naked selfies in which their ID cards have to be held in front of them. Both the front and back side of the ID card should be clearly readable. The borrowers also have to make a video (in which they also have to be naked), stating their name, the loaner’s name, the amount of the loan and interest, the date of payback, and the promise that in case they are not able to pay back the loan, they will have to “face the consequences.”

In the case of a delayed payback, loaners will threaten to release the borrowers’ naked pictures on the internet, or to expose their conduct to their parents and family. Sometimes loaners also propose a “flesh payback” (肉偿), for which borrowers will repay their loan with sexual activities.

What draws the public’s attention to the “naked loan” phenomenon is the recent leak of 10 gigabytes of documents from Jiedaibao (借贷宝), a Chinese online borrowing and lending platform. The documents concern private information of users, including naked pictures and videos of 161 borrowers. The borrowers are female netizens between the age of 17-23, many of them attending university or college.

Soon after the leak of these documents, Jiedaibao announced on its official Weibo account that they would take legal action to combat ‘naked loan’ practices and that they would set up a one-million ‘anti-naked fund’ to resolve the situation.

“The ‘Naked Loan’ phenomenon reveals the problem of modern youth; that their expanding desire for material wealth is increasingly incompatible with their real life situations.”

The issue also attracted the attention of official media. State media outlets such as People’s Daily (人民网) have called for better supervision over China’s online e-commerce platforms.

On Sina Weibo, netizens are also concerned about young women’s motives to take a naked loan. Many believe that university students are influenced by “consumerism”, that triggers young people to make extra money to purchase expensive cosmetics and accessories.

As one popular Weibo user writes: “The ‘Naked Loan’ [phenomenon] reveals the problem of modern youth; that their expanding desire for material wealth is increasingly incompatible with their real life situations (..) the life of “lower people” is ugly and undesirable; a decent and well-off life has become the norm.”

Another netizen is more apathetic about China’s young “spenders”: “Excessive consumption has become quite common among university students, yet society is neither understanding nor responding to such needs. Under an unsound credit system, young people fall victim to these ‘naked loans’.”

-By Diandian Guo
Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

print

Diandian Guo is a China-born Master student of transdisciplinary and global society, politics & culture at the University of Groningen with a special interest for new media in China. She has a BA in International Relations from Beijing Foreign Language University, and is specialized in China's cultural memory.

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

China Digital

Weibo Administration: “We’re No Longer Targeting Gay Content”

After a storm of critique following a ban on gay content, Weibo announces it will no longer specifically target cartoons, games, or videos relating to homosexuality.

Published on

Three days after Sina Weibo announced a clean-up of its platform that included a ban on homosexual content, it has announced that it will no longer target displays of homosexuality specifically.

Weibo administration (@微博管理员) wrote on Monday afternoon (Beijing time): ” This time, the cleanup of anime and games won’t target gay content. It is mainly [meant] to clean up content related to pornography, violence, and gore. Thank you for your discussions and suggestions.”

On Friday, the announcement that, along with violent and pornographic content, homosexual content would be targeted in a new online clean-up campaign, ignited a storm of discussion. Thousands of netizens then responded to the campaign with the hashtag “I am gay” (我是同性恋#).

The announcement and its aftermath show many similarities with a Weibo campaign of 2017, in which the platform said it would ban “displays of homosexuality” in online videos. Then, an official account of the Communist Youth League replied that “being gay is no disorder.”

Although comments on Friday’s Sina Weibo announcement have been locked for viewing, the responses to the new announcement on Monday were open to see.

Within three hours after Weibo’s Administration posted the rectification, it had been forwarded more than 33,000 times and received over 7500 comments. “I hope you’ll never announce discriminatory guidelines again,” some netizens said.

The Weibo account LGBT (@LGBT) responded to the new notice, writing that: “Weibo’s homophobic storm has settled,” and that this was a “step forward” in showing “respect for people who are different.”

By Manya Koetse

Screenshot of announcement:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.


Directly support Manya Koetse. By supporting this author you make future articles possible and help the maintenance and independence of this site. Donate directly through Paypal here. Also check out the What’s on Weibo donations page for more information.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

 

Continue Reading

China Digital

Weibo’s New Online Guidelines: No Homosexual Content Allowed

The official Weibo Community Manager announced a 3-month-ban on online content on April 13, including that on displays of homosexuality.

Published on

On April 13, Weibo’s Community Manager issued a notice with new guidelines for the social media platform to “create a bright and harmonious community environment.”

In the notice, that received near to 20,000 comments and over 96,000 shares shortly after it was posted (see screenshot), the official Sina Weibo account writes that, in order to “fulfill the corporate responsibility,” the platform will adhere to Internet Security Laws in strictly overseeing cartoons, games, videos, and other related content published on Weibo for a 3-month-period.

The Weibo Community Notice says its “clean-up” mainly targets content related to cartoons, images, and short videos relating to pornography, “bloody violence”, and homosexuality.

Violent content, such as that of the Grand Theft Auto game, will also not be allowed to appear on the social media platform.

According to the account, a total of 56,243 related violations were already “cleared” at the time they published the notice.

Although the announcement received many comments, they were not viewable at time of writing.

On their own accounts, many netizens also shared their views on the announcement: “According to China’s classification of mental disorders, being gay is not a mental illness,” one person writes: “Heterosexuals and homosexuals enjoy the same basic human rights. Publishing homosexual content is not illegal, and it should not be banned. It is my right to publish this post, and it would be wrong to delete it.”

“I object to Weibo’s guidelines against homosexual content. This is 2018, why do you still want to control everything people say?”

The slogan “I am Gay” (#我是同性恋#) also took off shortly after the announcement, with hundreds of netizens raising their voice against the guidelines by using this hashtag, some combining it with the hashtag “I am illegal” (Or: “I am breaking the law”) (#我违法#).

“If we don’t raise our voices now, then when will we?”, some said. “I am homosexual, and I am not proud of it, neither do I feel inferior,” one person stated.

This is not the first time the regulations for online content regarding the display of sexuality on Weibo are sharpened. In 2017, Chinese authorities also issued a statement in which they wrote that online audio-visual content on sites such as Sina Weibo would no longer be allowed to have any “display of homosexuality.” At the time, the Communist Youth League responded to the guidelines by posting: “Being gay is no disorder!”

Another commenter says: “I am an adult, and I should be able to view books, cartoons, or videos targeted at an adult audience. You’re now telling me I can’t view content relating to sexuality?”

“I am equal,” one Weibo user writes: “Why can’t we just respect each other?”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.


Directly support Manya Koetse. By supporting this author you make future articles possible and help the maintenance and independence of this site. Donate directly through Paypal here. Also check out the What’s on Weibo donations page for more information.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

 

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Follow on Twitter

Advertisement

About

What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

Contribute

Got any tips? Or want to become a contributor? Email us as at info@whatsonweibo.com.
Advertisement