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Ofo, Mobike, BlueGogo: China’s Messy Bikeshare Market

China’s bike-sharing market is now more booming than ever. Although the ubiquitous yellow, orange and blue scan & go bikes are easy, cheap, and convenient, they also cause chaos on the city streets and pavements.

Manya Koetse

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China’s bike-sharing market is now more booming than ever. Although the ubiquitous yellow, orange and blue scan & go bikes are easy, cheap, and convenient, they also cause chaos on the city streets and pavements.

While Uber, Didi and China’s ride-hailing market were all the talk in 2014 and 2015, it is all about Ofo, Mobike, Bluegogo and China’s bike-sharing market in 2016 and 2017.

With approximately 819 million people living in China’s cities, the urban transportation market is one of many opportunities and ample rivalry.

Bicycles have always been a major part of Chinese traffic, but now the streets of cities such as Shanghai and Beijing are flooded with bicycles more than ever due to the explosive popularity of bike sharing startups.

These bikes are unlocked and tracked using smartphone apps and can be rented for around 1 RMB (±0.15$) per hour or per half hour.

Although the main players are ofo, Mobike, and Bluegogo, there are also many other Chinese bike sharing companies such as Hello Bike, Youon or Coolqi. Some information about the big three:

Ofo (ofo共享单车) (backed by Xiaomi and Didi):
– Company founded in 2014
– First bike-sharing service provider in China.
– Started by students from Beijing University, led by Dai Wei.
– Services first launched in Beijing in 2015.
– Trial launch in Cambridge in April 2017.
– 128950 followers on Weibo.

Mobike (摩拜单车) (backed by Tencent):
– Founded in 2014 by CEO Wang Xiaofeng.
– First trial period in December 2015 in Shanghai.
– Officially launched in Shanghai on April 22, 2016.
– Beijing launch: September 1st, 2016.
– Now available in, amongst others, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, and also in Singapore.
– 65346 followers on Weibo.

Bluegogo (小蓝单车):
– Founded in 2016.
– Headquartered in Tianjin, CEO is Gang Li (李刚).
– Also launched in San Francisco.
– 76705 fans on Weibo

Bike sharing is easy, cheap and convenient, but it also has its downsides as the streets of cities like Beijing are cluttered with bicycles, often hindering pedestrians and cars.

The city government has therefore proposed new regulations in order to combat the chaos caused by the booming bike-sharing market.

See our latest Weivlog about this topic here (turn on English subtitles) :

– By Manya Koetse

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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  1. Avatar

    Tushar Trivedi

    August 17, 2017 at 1:24 am

    I had used service of OFO during my Beijing Visit. I have paid 200 RMB as deposite. How to return it back to my account? Can anyone help???

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China Digital

“Taobao Life”: This Feature Shows How Much Money You’ve Spent on Taobao

Some users just found out they could’ve bought a house with the money they’ve spent on Taobao.

Manya Koetse

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Over the past few days, a new Taobao feature that allows users to see how much money they have spent on the online shopping platform is flooding Chinese social media.

Taobao Marketplace is China’s biggest online shopping platform. Owned by tech giant Alibaba, Taobao was launched in 2003 to facilitate consumer-to-consumer retail.

For many people, Taobao shopping has become part of their everyday life. Whether it is clothes, pet food, accessories, electronics, furniture – you name it, Taobao has it.

Because buying on Taobao is so easy, fast, and convenient, many online consumers lose track of how much they actually spent on the platform – especially if they have been using it for years already.

Thanks to “Taobao Life,” users can now see the total amount of money spent on their account.

How to do it? First: go to Taobao settings and click the profile account as indicated below.

Image by whatsonweibo.com

Then click the top icon that says “Achievement” (成就).

Image by whatsonweibo.com

And here you find what you have spent in this account in total. On the left: the money spent, on the right: the amount of purchases.

Image by whatsonweibo.com

Since I’ve used started using this Taobao account for the occasional clothes shopping since 2016, I’ve made 122 purchases, spending 7849 yuan ($1140) – a very reasonable amount compared to some other Taobao users, who are now finding out they could have practically bought an apartment with the money they have spent on Taobao.

This user, for example, found out they spent over half a million yuan on Taobao ($75,500).

Image via whatsonweibo.com

This user below has spent over 1,1 million yuan on Taobao ($170,000).

Some people discuss all the things they could have bought with the money they have spent on Taobao over the years: “As soon as I saw the number, I wanted to cry,” one Weibo user writes: “What have I done?!”

Another person, finding out they have spent 230,000 yuan on Taobao ($33,400), writes: “This can’t be true! Surely this must be a mistake!?”

“If I wouldn’t have spent all this money on Taobao, I would’ve been rich,” others say.

The topic of Taobao’s total spending amount has become so popular on Chinese social media this week, causing so much consternation, that Taobao posted a message on its Weibo account on July 27, writing: “We heard you guys couldn’t sleep last night..”

Although many people are shocked to find out the money they’ve spent on Taobao, others console themselves with the thought that adding up everything they have spent on Taobao, they were actually ‘rich’ at some point in their lives.

 

By Manya Koetse , with contributions from Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Digital

Summer Censorship: Weibo Launches “Project Sky Blue”

No hot summer on Weibo: the social media network announces extra censorship on ‘vulgar content.’

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Earlier this week, the administration of Sina Weibo announced a special summer holiday crackdown on “vulgar content,” including “pornographic novels, erotic anime, pictures or videos.”

In a public announcement that was posted on July 4th, the Weibo administration writes that the primary goal of this campaign is to “create a healthier, more positive environment for underage users” during the summer break period.

The censorship plan is titled “Project Deep Blue” (or: “Project Sky Blue”) (蔚蓝计划), and will use filter systems, human moderators and user reports to censor more content for the upcoming two months.

The project even has its own Weibo account now, where Weibo users can ask questions, report inappropriate content, and get more information on the campaign.

Weibo states it will further expand its team of online content supervisors, and also explicitly encourages netizens to flag ‘inappropriate’ content to make the online community ‘more wholesome.’

The hashtag #ProjectDeepBlue (#蔚蓝计划#) topped the hot search lists on Weibo this week; not necessarily because of the topic’s popularity, but because it was placed there by the social media site’s administration. At time of writing, the hashtag page has attracted more than 180 million views.

Online responses to the summer censorship program are mixed: many commenters voice their support for the latest measure, while others express frustration.

One Weibo user from Hubei calls the latest measure “hypocritical,” arguing that minors surf Weibo just as much during school time as during the summer holiday – suggesting that launching a special censorship program for the summer vacation does not make sense at all.

But many popular comments are in favor of the project, saying: “I support Project Deep Blue, the internet needs to be cleaned up,” and: “China’s young people need to be protected.”

This is not the first time Weibo launches a special intensified censorship program. Throughout the years, it has repeatedly carried out ‘anti-pornography‘ campaigns in cooperation with Chinese cyberspace authorities.

Often, the crusade against ‘vulgar’ content also ends up being used for the purpose of censoring political content rather than to actually eradicate ‘obscenities’ (read more).

By now, it seems that many Weibo users are quite actively using the Project Deep Blue tag to report on other users who are posting violent or vulgar content.

“If you’re not careful, you’re hit with vulgar and obscene content the moment you’re on the internet,” well-known mom blogger Humapanpan (@虎妈潘潘) writes: “Now that the summer holiday is coming, I hope we can join the Project Deep Blue, and clean up the internet environment.  Actively report obscene content the moment you see it – let’s protect our future together.”

By Skylar Xu & Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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