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Shanghai Man Sentenced to 8 Months in Prison for Throwing Garbage out of Apartment Window

The case of this Shanghai man shows how small crimes can lead to big consequences.

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On April 9, Shanghai’s Yangpu District’s court sentenced a man to 8 months in prison for throwing garbage out of his third-floor apartment window, injuring a person who was passing by. The court also ordered the man to pay a 5000 yuan ($760) fine.

On February 10 of 2021, a man by the name of Yu (於) threw a plastic garbage bag out of the kitchen window of his apartment on the third floor. The trash bag, which also contained broken cups, hit a woman who was passing by below, causing injury to her head. The incident was captured by neighborhood security cameras.

Mr. Yu allegedly was not aware that someone was walking below his apartment building when he threw out the trash.

The man was sentenced for “dropping objects from a high altitude” (高空抛物), which is included in the criminal law. This was the first court case in which a person was sentenced according to this law, which formally went into effect on March 1st of 2021.

To illustrate the dangers of throwing trash or other items from a high altitude, Party newspaper People’s Daily issued an image on social media that showed that even a mahjong tile could cause serious injury when thrown from a 20th-floor window.

On social media site Weibo, the case has become a hot topic. Many netizens support the court’s decision, claiming that throwing trash out of a window is as serious as drunk driving. Some people also suggest that despite the potential injury that could be caused by tossing out items from a high altitude, it is also morally wrong to do so.

The issue of throwing trash from windows and high altitudes is receiving more attention recently, with some neighborhood service announcements also warning people about the dangers.

Image via Dushi Kuaibao.

“A person who disregards the safety of others in such a way needs to be severely punished,” one commenter wrote.

By Manya Koetse

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©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Local News

Hunan Man Kills Wife by Running Over Her Twice with SUV

The 22-year-old Hunan woman was killed by her husband after unsuccessfully filing for divorce.

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WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

A fatal incident in which a man ran over his wife twice in front of an administrative office in Linxiang, Hunan, has become a trending topic on Chinese social media.

The incident happened on the morning of June 29, when the husband and wife met up to file for divorce. Due to an issue with the husband’s residence registration, they left the office unable to finalize their divorce.

The man, driving a white car, then reportedly had agreed to let his wife get some of her belongings from his car. But while approaching her by car, he suddenly sped up and hits her, after which he drove over her.

While some bystanders rushed to the victim who was laying on the sidewalk, the man turned his SUV around and ran over his wife a second time before fleeing the scene. A nearby driver captured the incident on a dash cam.

The woman, named Li, died at the hospital later that day. Li, mother of two children, was only 22 years old. The husband was later intercepted on the highway, and he has since been arrested. The case officially is still under investigation.

According to the victim’s cousin, who accompanied her to the administrative affairs office that day, the couple had since long separated and were only meeting to finalize the divorce. The cousin was just getting to her motorcycle at the parking place when Li was hit by the car.

On social media platform Weibo, hundreds of people responded to the news. “You can’t do this to anyone – let alone your own wife,” one commenter wrote, with others suggesting the man should be sentenced to death over what he did.

By Manya Koetse , with contributions by Miranda Barnes

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China Local News

Chinese Twin Sisters Switched Identities to Illegally Travel Abroad over 30 Times

The lookalike sisters thought it was “convenient” to use each other’s passport to travel to Japan, Russia, Thailand and other countries.

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WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

On June 27, a local public security bureau in the city of Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, released a press statement regarding the peculiar case of twin sisters who used each other’s identity to travel abroad over thirty times.

The two Zhou sisters, *Hong and *Wei (pseudonyms), started switching identities when Hong’s husband, a Japanese national, returned to Japan. Hong wanted to join her husband in Japan, but her visa application was repeatedly denied due to not meeting the requirements.

Hong then decided to use her sister’s travel documents to travel to Japan to see her husband various times. She reportedly also used her sister’s passport to travel to Russia. She ended up traveling between China, Russia, and Japan at least thirty times.

Wei, who reportedly thought this way of switching identities was “convenient”, also used her sister’s passport to travel to Thailand and some other countries on four different occasions.

After authorities found out what the sisters had been up to earlier in 2022, they were advised in May to return back to China. While the case is still under investigation, the sisters are now being held for the criminal offense of border management obstruction.

The case went trending in the hot-search topic list on Weibo, where many people are wondering how this could have happened so many times. “If you exit and enter the country, aren’t fingerprints collected?”, some wondered, with others saying the border technological systems were apparently not good enough to detect such identity fraud.

There were also those who thought the story was quite “amazing” and sounded “like the plot of a television series.”

By Manya Koetse

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