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Getting on the Pokémon Bus: Taiwan’s Booming Pokémon Go Business

The highly anticipated release of Pokemon Go in Taiwan on August 6th has led to a true Pokemon Go craze. It has brought about a thriving Pokemon Go business – introducing anything from Pokemon Go university courses to Pokemon Go bus tours.

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The highly anticipated release of Pokémon Go in Taiwan on August 6th has led to a national Pokémon Go craze. It has brought about a thriving Pokémon business – introducing anything from Pokémon Go university courses to Pokémon Go bus tours.

After a month of waiting impatiently, Taiwan has finally welcomed the global Pokémon Go hype on August 6th. The Taiwan arrival of the game, where players locate and ‘capture’ virtual creatures called Pokémon with their mobile device, soon become a much-talked about topic on social media, anywhere from Weibo to Twitter.

John Hanke, the man behind the game, welcomed Taiwan to the Pokémon Go family with a friendly Tweet in traditional Chinese, saying: “Taiwan – Welcome to Pokémon Go.”

 

“National Taiwan University offers a special Pokémon course: ‘A Study on Pokémon.'”

 

The innocent Tweet soon triggered some animosity from mainland netizens who angrily asked why Pokémon Go was available in Taiwan but not in mainland China, where the game yet remains inaccessible.

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Despite this little controversy, the Pokémon craze in Taiwan is just as crazy as it is in the rest of the world. So crazy, in fact, that Taiwan’s top university National Taiwan University has even decided to offer a special Pokémon course.

The course is called “A Study on Pokémon“. Perhaps contrary to expectations, it will not teach about all the Pokémon in the game or how to catch them. Instead, it offers a study into the Pokémon phenomenon from a scientific and legal angle.

 

“Pokémon Go resulted in more than 800 traffic fines just three days after the game became available in Taiwan.”

 

Like in the rest of the world, Pokémon Go is also causing some trouble here in Taiwan. News has been coming in of people playing the game while driving their car, or riding their scooter with one hand while trying to catch Pokémon with the other.

The arrival of Pokémon Go resulted in more than 800 traffic fines just three days after the game became available in Taiwan.

At the Taipei Zoo, special signs inform visitors about the right way to play Pokémon Go whilst visiting the park, humorously reminding them to mind their step and the animals when playing.

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A resourceful Taiwanese netizen came up with a new business idea after hearing about all the accidents caused by the game. Vera Lin posted her chauffeur services on her Facebook page. For NT$ 650 (±US$20), she said, players in the Taoyuan area could hire her to drive them around town on her scooter while they could catch Pokémon.

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Her business allegedly also included other special services. “While in transit,” Lin wrote, “if you see someone you like, I can stop the scooter and get their phone number or ask for a photo on your behalf.” Sadly, to the dismay of many male netizens, it turned out Ms. Lin didn’t even know how to ride a bicycle.

 

“Pokémon bus tours: an experienced Pokémon trainer will be on the bus to share his tips and tricks on playing the game.”

 

Though Vera Lin’s services are fake, there are real services in Taiwan that offer to chauffeur players around town to catch ‘em all. For NT$ 3000 (±US$96) players can hire a taxi for 8 hours to drive them around town.

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Taiwanese travel e-commerce platform KKday introduced Pokémon-themed bus tours around Taipei as a way to promote their business. The Pokémon Go tours, that were offered from August 11-13, were free and were led by an experienced Pokémon Go player. Pokémon bus tours have also become news on Sina Weibo.

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During the KKday Pokémon tours, professional Pokémon Go player Hsu Chieh showed participants how & where to catch Pokémon. The tour also visited local attractions while playing the game. The promotional tours turned out to be very successful, as 1000 fans registered to participate.

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Local tour agency Lion Travel now also offers a Pokémon bus tour with a price tag of NT$99 (US$3). This 4-hour Lion Travel bus tour takes players to popular attractions such as the 228 Peace Memorial Park and Tamsui Old Street. An experienced Pokémon trainer will be on the bus to share his tips and tricks on playing the game. The tour makes use of Lure Modules at every stop to attract more Pokémon.

 

“Cruises take players around the lake, allowing them to capture those water-loving Pokémon that cannot be found on land.”
 

Pokémon Go’s arrival in Taiwan has already proven to be good for land-based businesses, but it has also been profitable for on-water businesses. Inspired by the idea of catching water-based Pokémon, boat operators at Taiwan’s tourist attraction Sun Moon Lake are now offering Pokémon-themed cruises. These cruises take players around the lake, allowing them to capture those water-loving Pokémon that cannot be found on land. There has also been news of families and groups of friends chartering boats just to catch Pokémon.

The Pokémon craze has resulted in many Pokémon-related promotional offers in Taiwan. As one Weibo netizen recently wrote: “It has only been 5 days since Pokémon Go was released in Taiwan, and already shops on every street are offering discounts for Pokémon Go players!”

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One remarkable offer is one that is currently being offered by a Taiwanese funeral home. In Taichung, a funeral home put out a billboard ad with a message that reads: “13% off on services for deaths caused by Pokémon Go related accidents.” Fortunately, nobody has claimed the offer yet.

By Chi Wen, edited by Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

Chi Wen is a freelance translator and writer who lives in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Besides translating and writing, he also teaches English as a Second Language to high school students. Chi is a self-proclaimed geek with a love for video games.

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China Memes & Viral

Dutch Vlogger Discovers Her Boyfriend’s Photo on a Chinese TV Drama

Dutch vlogger Rianne Meijer was surprised to discover her boyfriend being somebody else’s lover in this Chinese television drama.

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The Dutch influencer Rianne Meijer has gone viral in the Netherlands and on Chinese social media after she posted a TikTok video in which she shared the discovery of her boyfriend’s photo in a Chinese TV drama.

“Remember this picture? This is a picture that I posted with my boyfriend a while ago,” Rianne says in the TikTok video, then showing a scene in Chinese TV drama in which a photoshopped photo of Rianne’s boyfriend is featured.

Although Rianne stood next to her boyfriend in the original photo, her face was replaced in the photoshopped edition featured on the Chinese TV drama.

“They look good together, it’s fine!” Rianne jokingly responded to the scene.

Rianne Meijer is an online influencer and YouTuber with some 1.5 million fans on her Instagram. She is known for often posting funny videos and photos, sometimes together with her boyfriend Roy.

The scene featuring Roy’s photo comes from the Chinese TV drama Summer Again (薄荷之夏), which premiered on iQiyi in the summer of 2021.

The scene shows a lady named Mi Ya (played by actress Li Borong 李柏蓉) talking about her relationship with a man named ‘Andre.’

On the Chinese social media site Weibo, many netizens found the incident “embarrassing” and did not understand why the staff would just steal someone’s portrait: “Couldn’t the production team even find a foreign guy to take a picture?”

Others also thought the incident was very funny: “This is the reality of our global village. You’d think nobody would find out, but it’s really not so secret.”

According to Rianne’s most recent Tiktok post update, the show’s production staff has since sent her an apology. She also writes it’s “all good,” adding: “They are so sweet and this gave us a good laugh.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Arts & Entertainment

Chinese Musician Song Dongye Canceled (Again) after Complaining about China’s Cancel Culture

Song Dongye was shut down by Weibo after airing his grievances at being shut out from China’s entertainment circles.

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Five years after being caught with drugs, Chinese singer Song Dongye went on Weibo to share his grievances on still being ‘canceled’ and asking for another chance to restart his career. Instead, he got criticized and blocked.

Chinese folk singer Song Dongye (宋冬野) has become a major topic on Chinese social media site Weibo this week after he posted a lengthy statement on his account airing his grievances regarding how he was shut out from China’s entertainment world after being caught with drugs.

In Song’s Weibo post of October 11 titled “I Need to Say Something” (“我需要说一些话”), the singer complained that one of his performances was canceled and that he has not been able to perform since he was detained for drug use five years ago.

The Beijing singer was scheduled to hold a concert in Chengdu on October 16th, but local authorities eventually canceled the show after receiving reports about Song being a drug addict.

According to Song, it is not the first time that one of his concerts is suddenly canceled for no apparent reason. In his post, the Beijing artist shared how disappointed he is that yet another performance was called off, even though it was previously approved and was organized in compliance with all strict regulations.

It seems that Song Dongye just cannot get rid of his tainted reputation.

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The 34-year-old Song Dongye started his career as a musician in 2009 and signed with the Modern Sky record label in 2012. One of his biggest hits is the 2013 song ‘Miss Dong’ (董小姐) (link), after which Song’s career further flourished.

Things went sour in 2016, when Song was arrested for smoking marijuana in Beijing after someone allegedly tipped off the police. Not long after news on his arrest made the rounds, Song himself posted a statement on his Weibo account on October 25th of 2016, apologizing to everyone for violating the law and promising to better himself.

Song is not the first Chinese celebrity to have been caught with drugs. There is an entire list of celebrities who were caught doing drugs, especially in the 2014-2016 years – including names such as Jaycee Chan, Kai Ko, and Zhang Mo.

In Song’s most recent Weibo post, the solo artist explains how his former drug abuse deeply affected him and his family, and that he has never touched drugs again since his ten-day prison sentence five years ago in 2016.

Song Donye’s lengthy Weibo post of October 11, in which he shared his grievances regarding still being ‘canceled’ five years after being arrested for drug use.

Despite the fact that Song complied with court orders and became an anti-drug advocate, he apparently is still not able to perform – even though the prescribed three-year ban on performing (in accordance with regulations provided by the Ministry of Culture) has officially ended two years ago.

The musician writes that he feels wronged. As a former drug abuser, he feels it was right for him to be punished, but he also says that drug users are actually the victims, claiming that drug trafficking is the real crime. Song argues that it is very difficult to be in the entertainment industry and that it is not easy to say no to drugs when you are down, depressed, and pressured.

In his Weibo post, the artist actually suggests he has been victimized in two ways: firstly, as a depressed artist lured into taking drugs, and second, as a canceled celebrity who keeps on being shut out from China’s entertainment circles.

“I can’t understand it, I’m confused,” Song writes: “I’ve violated the law, but I’ve been punished! I’ve been detained and then I also received five years of verbal abuse! I’ve been educated! I understand! I never messed up again! I got up again, and I changed! I became a better person! Is that still not enough for me to be able to make a living? Why? I’m not doing anything but playing some small offline gigs in order to get by! I’m just a singer-songwriter! What else do you want me to do? (..) Shouldn’t society give people who have broken the law another chance?”

Song concludes his post by saying that, regardless of the challenges he is facing, he will not give up on his work.

Song’s Post Backfires

Soon after Song Dongye posted his short essay on Weibo, thousands of reactions started flooding in. Many netizens did not feel sorry for the artist, but instead blamed him for “playing the victim.”

The issue triggered a major discussion on Chinese social media on whether or not artists with a bad reputation should be allowed back into the limelight.

A recent article by What’s on Weibo on 25 ‘tainted celebrities’ in China (25 ‘Tainted Celebrities’: What Happens When Chinese Entertainers Get Canceled?) shows that Chinese entertainers who previously got ‘canceled’ generally do not return to the big stage, either because they have simply fallen out of favor with most people or because they are being shunned and sidelined in the entertainment industry (or a combination of both).

Many people felt that Song Dongye was being a hypocrite, not just because they felt he was excusing his former drug use by saying drug traffickers are the real offenders, but also because Song allegedly did do multiple commercial shows over the past five years and has been actively setting up new businesses since his 2016 arrest.

For official media accounts, in the meantime, this apparently seemed to be a good moment to highlight their anti-drug informational posts.

State newspaper People’s Daily posted a series of photographs on October 12th featuring police officers who got injured while doing their work combating drug trafficking and drug use, stating that over thirty staff members of the law enforcement against drugs were killed since 2017.

The post’s message was clear: these Chinese officers in drug law enforcement were unable to get a second chance in life – why would Song, as a drug abuser, be allowed to get another chance to restart his career as a performer?

That idea resonated with many, who wrote: “We should have a zero-tolerance policy [towards drugs]. We can’t ever revive these police officers!”

Another image circulated on social media with the tagline “taking drugs and selling drugs is the same crime,” showing a musician offering money for drugs and a law enforcement officer being shot on the job (image below).

On that same day, Song’s Weibo account was temporarily suspended. The hashtag “Song Dongye’s Weibo Suspended” (#宋冬野微博被禁言#) received over 620 million views in the days following the ban.

Many people on Weibo share the view that those who chose to take illegal drugs for their own pleasure can never be a public figure again, earning money from commercial appearances.

Others wrote that Song should have never posted his essay at all since it only caused him to be labeled as a ‘tainted celebrity’ again, even though many people had already forgotten about his former drug use. They think that Song’s real problem hindering his future career now is not his 2016 offense, but his 2021 Weibo post.

Song Dongye’s post did not just affect him, it indirectly also affected other Chinese ‘tainted celebrities.’

A planned concert by Chinese singer Li Daimo (李代沫), a previous contestant of The Voice of China (中国好声音), was also canceled this week following the Song Dongye controversy.

Li Daimo continued his music career after his 2014 drug offense.

Li Daimo was arrested in 2014 for possession of drugs and was later sentenced to a fine and nine months in prison. After being released from prison, Li resumed his music career. Although his tainted past was still sometimes discussed on social media, he was one of the few artists who seemed to have made some sort of a comeback to the entertainment industry after such a major controversy.

The Song Dongye situation, however, also made people (and authorities) reflect on Li’s current career.

Over the past year, Chinese celebrities have become a target of authorities and state media have consistently been reporting on the importance of Chinese stars setting a good example for their fans.

But amid all controversy, there are also people who come to Song’s defense: “If an artist has been punished for three years, we should give people the opportunity to reappear. It might [even] be more beneficial to the anti-drug campaign.”

“I really like his songs,” one person wrote about Song: “But he did drugs, and I can’t forgive him for that.”

At this time, it is not clear when or if Song Dongye will be allowed to post on his Weibo account again. Although his Weibo page is still there, it currently says: “This account has temporarily been suspended for violating Weibo guidelines.” It is not clarified which specific guidelines Song violated with his post.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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