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What’s on Weibo Blocked in China

What’s on Weibo is no longer accessible from within the PRC.

Manya Koetse

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As of July 7, we’ve been notified by readers that What’s on Weibo is no longer accessible from within mainland China. After some testing, we have discovered that our site has indeed been blocked from all locations in the PRC now.

This is unfortunate for the many readers we have from mainland China. What’s on Weibo has been blocked before in late 2015, after which it was opened again in the summer of 2016. It is unsure if the current block is temporary and if the site will be accessible in China in the future again.

In the meantime, we will continue to report what is trending on Chinese social media. Follow What’s on Weibo on Twitter or Facebook to get daily updates on our latest articles.

In case you need a VPN, NordVPN currently has a very attractive $2.75 Summer deal (other recommended VPNs here and here).

By Manya Koetse

PS!: If you enjoy What’s on Weibo and support the way we report the latest trends in China, we welcome donations via Wechat or Paypal. We can use every penny to help pay for the upkeep, maintenance, and betterment of this site (read more).

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Mickey D

    July 7, 2018 at 7:40 pm

    CONGRATULATIONS! I’m sure you know, you should be honored to be blocked by the cult of Mao/Xi terrorist regime. The one and only thing I agree with Trump on is his tariffs on Maoland. If he keeps up the pressure, or once he’s impeached–hopefully very soon–the next administration, the people might finally take down “emperor-for-life” Mao-wannabe Xi’it-for-brains! The Chinese people will be free, and the world will have an honest government to trade with. The regime’s demise will bring a win-win era, not that cancerous One Belt BS!

  2. Avatar

    love China

    July 7, 2018 at 8:18 pm

    CONGRATULATIONS! I’m sure you know, you should be blocked because your site is only read by LBH white losers who predictably only use it an avenue to hate Chinese and spout racist drivel about the cult of Mao/Xi terrorist regime. The one and only thing I agree with Xi on is his banning of LBH anti china hate groups like this one. If he keeps up the pressure, hopefully very soon, people might finally take down all anti china white LBH hate groups, then the Chinese people will be free, and the world will be more loving. The demise of western bigots will bring a win-win era and a wonderful One Belt century for China! Love China. Peace out!

  3. Avatar

    unknow

    July 10, 2018 at 12:02 am

    it just dns pollution,netizen only use the dnscrypt-proxy can solve this problem,the ip is not blocked,just the domain name.

  4. Avatar

    unkown

    July 10, 2018 at 12:04 am

    the major method is dns pollution and ip block which to block website that china rejeced.

  5. Avatar

    Bruce Humes

    July 11, 2018 at 7:41 am

    Sorry to hear u have been blocked! But I do hope it will encourage u to cover sensitive topics more boldly.

    Bruce Humes

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China and Covid19

“Like a Zombie Apocalypse” – Chaotic Scenes in Shanghai as People Flee Building after Abnormal Test Result

After a notice of a positive test result inside a building in Shanghai’s Yangpu District, people fled outside to avoid getting locked in.

Manya Koetse

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Videos showing some chaotic scenes with dozens of people fleeing a building in Shanghai surfaced on Chinese social media today.

“Are they filming a movie?”, some commenters wondered, with others jokingly suggesting a zombie apocalypse was taking place.

The incident occurred on August 12th at around 3pm at the A1 building of the Oriental Fisherman’s Wharf (东方渔人码头) in Shanghai’s Yangpu District.

People inside the premises of the Oriental Fisherman’s Wharf, which is home to a shopping mall and office buildings, allegedly received notice of an abnormal (positive) Covid test result and an ensuing local 48-hour lockdown.

“Once the people inside received the news they fled. They will have to be called back to isolate,” one commenter wrote.

“This is the reason why I don’t go to shopping malls,” another Weibo user replied: “I buy what I can online, and otherwise get it at small roadside stores.”

On Thursday, Shanghai reported 7 Covid cases, the highest number since July 28, breaking a seven-day streak of zero cases. All 7 cases can be traced back to the same location in Shanghai’s Xuhui district (a local foot massage parlor).

Although some commenters on Weibo said they could understand people running away from a potential lockdown, there were also those who said they were being selfish for doing so, as their families might also need to quarantine if they would return home.

Some discussed how Shanghai residents must suffer from some form of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) due to the Shanghai lockdowns earlier this year and the mismanagement of the Covid outbreak.

“I used to think the world was so small,” one netizen writes: “If I didn’t feel good I’d just go to Seoul or Bangkok for the weekend and return in time for work on Monday. I now feel the world is so big. If I go to Shanghai I fear being locked inside the city. The epidemic has changed my view on life, and my view on what happiness is.”

By Manya Koetse

 

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Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Media

News of Pelosi Bringing Son on Taiwan Trip Goes Trending on Weibo

News of ‘Little Paul’ quietly joining Pelosi to Taiwan received over 380 million views on Weibo on Friday.

Manya Koetse

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Perhaps one would not expect Chinese state tabloid Global Times to care about American taxpayers’ money being spent responsibly, but in today’s trending headline on Weibo, they suggest they do:

As American media have discovered, Pelosi’s son Paul Pelosi Jr., who is not an official nor an adviser to her, has followed Pelosi around Asia at the expense of the American taxpayer,” Global Times wrote.

The topic “Pelosi Secretly Brought her Son to Visit Taiwan” (#佩洛西窜台偷偷带儿子#) garnered over 380 million views on Weibo on Friday.

Earlier this week, various American media outlets, including The New York Post, reported that the 53-year-old Pelosi Jr. ​traveled together with Nancy Pelosi during her Asia trip, but his name was not included in the official list of officials on the trip released by the speaker’s office.

The Chinese-language Global Times report on this issue is largely based on America’s Fox News host Jesse Watters reacting to Nancy Pelosi bringing her son on the Asia trip in his ‘Primetime’ show, with many of his words being directly translated in the Chinese news report: “He is not an elected official, he is not an advisor Nancy, he doesn’t even live in Washington, but he was greeted as royalty by the President of Taiwan.”

Jesse Watters’ suggested that Pelosi Jr. was involved in “shady” business, being on the payroll of two lithium mining companies and then visiting Taiwan, a world leader in lithium battery production. “Prince Pelosi will go wherever the money is,” Watters said, a sentiment that was reiterated by Global Times.

During a press conference, Pelosi confirmed that her son had joined her on the trip, saying: “His role was to be my escort. Usually, we – we invited spouses. Not all could come. But I had him come. And I was very proud that he was there. And I’m thrilled – and it was nice for me.”

When Pelosi was asked if her son had any business dealings while they were in Asia, she replied: “No, he did not. Of course, he did not.”

In response to Pelosi’s highly controversial visit to Taiwan, the Chinese government took sanctions against Pelosi and her immediate family.

According to Global Times, this might also affect Paul Pelosi Jr., who allegedly sought business opportunities in China via two companies, International Media Acquisition Corp and Global Tech Industries Group.

Many netizens are also ridiculing ‘Little Paulie’ (小保罗), especially because, based on the reports, they had somehow expected Pelosi’s son to be a child or young man instead of a 52-year-old. Part of the confusion stems from the Chinese translation for “Jr.”, xiǎo (小), which also means “little.”

“He’s 52! I though we were talking about a little kid,” some wrote, with others calling him a ‘mama’s boy.’

“That entire family will just do anything for money,” others wrote.

More than a week after Pelosi’s visit, news of ‘Little Paul’ joining her on the controversial trip just reinforces existing narratives on Chinese social media, led by official media, that Pelosi’s Taipei decision was more about self-interest than serving her country – and its taxpayers.

By Manya Koetse

 

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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