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Woman Cuts Through Village Network Cables for Better Feng Shui, Leaves 8000 Households Without Internet

A woman in Anyang was so focused on her home’s feng shui that she cut through eight cables near her house, leaving 8000 households without internet.

Manya Koetse

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A woman in Anyang, China, was so focused on her home’s feng shui recently that she cut through eight cables near her house, leaving 8000 households without internet.

A woman in Tongye town in Anyang, Henan, recently cut through eight optical cables that were crucial to the village’s communication network, leaving 8000 households without phone and internet for a day.

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Chinese news magazine The Observer (@观察者网) reported on Weibo that the woman named Mrs. Cheng cut through the cables intentionally to improve her home’s ‘feng shui’ (风水).

Feng shui is an ancient Chinese doctrine that focuses on harmony and balance. It helps organize one’s home or office based on its principles to keep negative energy away. The prolonged exposure to electromagnetic fields, for example, is believed to have a negative influence on people’s health – which might have been the reason the woman cut through the village optic cables.

“According to her thinking, these cables are bad for the brain,” one netizen responded: “Perhaps it’s better if she moves to the mountains.”

“This shows how important education is,” others say.

“What a cruel woman,” someone else writes: “In the present-day era, you can cut off anything, but don’t cut off our wifi!”

Various Chinese media report that the woman will be sued for vandalizing public property. “At least her feng shui will be very different in prison,” one commenter writes on Weibo.

– By Manya Koetse
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©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    FengShuiBalanz

    August 12, 2019 at 7:44 am

    Maybe the old lady should worry more about the big High Voltage Power right behind her house. This will definitely radiate much more EMF waves towards her house a some small wires. This seems that the Feng Shui remedies are taken out of context and taken too far. Feng Shui is the ancient way to stay in balance, but this should also include common sense. It would not be even efficient if a person stresses out to have the Feng Shui. A huge part in ones destiny is the so called “Man-Luck” which is the personal decision making that needs to be worried about. Feng Shui is only 33% of our luck, Man-Luck is 33% and the rest is based on our Heaven Luck (Destiny). The best is to have some have some common knowledge about Feng Shui Tips and how to apply them in a sufficient way.

  2. Avatar

    Sunisa

    January 24, 2020 at 8:55 am

    I totally agree with the above comment. It is very selfish just to go ahead and cut some smaller cables and think it will improve her Feng Shui inside the home. I am pretty sure, if she so much worries about this and her house would be in perfect shape with all the cures and enhancers, these wires would not cause any major harm to her. If indeed, she got sick for some reason, I am sure the big electric tower behind her house is to blame as it transmits such intense negative energy in an area of 1 km around it, this would most likely be the cause for any problems inside her home. I hope she will learn and pays a high bill to fix the damage. I cannot point out to always follow basic Feng Shui Tips and common sense with it to live a happy, balanced and peaceful life.

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China and Covid19

Anger over Guangzhou Anti-Epidemic Staff Picking Locks, Entering Homes

While these Guangzhou homeowners were quarantined at a hotel, anti-epidemic staff broke their door locks and entered their homes.

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WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are trending. This article was first published

Dozens of homeowners in Guangzhou, Guangdong, were angered to find out the locks of their apartment doors were broken during their mandatory hotel quarantine.

The residents had gone to a quarantine location after a positive Covid case in their building. Afterward, anti-epidemic staff had entered their homes for disinfection and to check if any residents were still inside.

The incident happened earlier this month in an apartment complex in the Liwan district of the city.

The incident first gained attention on July 10 when various videos showing the broken door locks were posted online. During the morning, the property management had conducted an ’emergency inspection’ of 84 households. The doors were later sealed.

The case went trending again on July 18 when the residential district apologized to all homeowners for the break-ins and promised to compensate them.

“What’s the use of apologizing?” some Weibo commenters wondered. “Where is the law? If this even happens in Guangzhou now and people in Guangdong put up with this, what else will they dare to do in the future?”

On Chinese social media, most comments on the Guangzhou incident were about the break-ins allegedly being unlawful.

Media reporter and Toutiao author Kai Lei (@凯雷), who has over two million followers on Weibo, said the incident showed that those breaking in “had no regard for the law.”

To read more about Covid-19 in China, check our articles here.

By Manya Koetse
With contributions by Miranda Barnes

 

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China Local News

Shanghai Ruijin Hospital Stabbing Incident

The police opened fire and subdued the suspect, who stabbed at least four people at Shanghai’s Ruijin Hospital on Saturday.

Manya Koetse

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WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

On Saturday July 9, a stabbing incident that occurred at Shanghai’s renowned Ruijin Hospital (上海瑞金医院) shocked Chinese netizens as videos showing the panic and chaos at the scene circulated in Wechat groups and on Weibo.

At around 11:30 AM the police department started receiving calls that there was someone stabbing people at the hospital, which is located in the city’s Huangpu district. At the scene of the incident, at the 7th floor of the outpatient clinic, they found a knife-wielding man holding a group of people hostage.

According to police reports, the police opened fire and subdued the suspect. Four people who were injured during the knife attack are now being treated, none of them are in a life-threatening situation.

The case is currently under investigation.

According to The Paper, Ruijin Hospital resumed its outpatient services at 14:08 this afternoon.

This is the second stabbing incident in Shanghai this week. On Monday, a man was arrested after going on a random stabbing spree in Shanghai’s Jing’an District.

While some Shanghai residents say the recent incidents made them feel less safe, others praise the fast police response to the incident.

One doctor from Shanghai posted on Weibo that hospitals should have proper security checks in place in order to prevent these kinds of incidents from happening again in the future.

By Manya Koetse
With contributions by Miranda Barnes

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