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After A4 Waist and iPhone6 Legs, Here Is the ‘Heart-Shaped Boob’ Challenge

“The A4 Waist is out of fashion, now the Heart-Shaped Boob challenge is popular,” – a sentence that is buzzing around Weibo these days. Is this indeed the next bizarre challenge to go viral on Chinese social media?

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“The A4 Waist is out of fashion, now the Heart-Shaped Boob challenge is popular,” – a sentence that is buzzing around Weibo these days. Is this indeed the next bizarre challenge to go viral on Chinese social media?

Update August 11: This challenge has now been completely removed from Sina Weibo. The hashtag no longer shows any results.

Every now and then a new ‘challenge’ pops up on Chinese social media that allows netizens to show off their bodies. There’s been the A4 Waist Challenge, the iPhone6 Legs, or the One Finger Selfie hype. Now a new challenge is making its rounds on Weibo, originating from one of China’s live-streaming apps.

For the ‘Heart Symbol Boob challenge’ (桃心胸挑战), female netizens try to make a heart shape out of their breasts. The latest challenge is a risky one, because “obscene” (yinhui) or “pornographic” (seqing) images are officially not allowed on Chinese social media. Many of the images posted by netizens have already been removed.

People started talking about the ‘heart-shaped boob’ earlier this week, with many Weibo users saying: “The A4 Waist is out of fashion, now the Heart-Shaped Boob Challenge is popular!”

Their claims might be more about wishful thinking than that the challenge itself is actually a major hype just yet: the ‘Heart-Shaped Boob Challenge’ is more talked about than actually taken on. With 1.4 million views of the topic #HeartShapedBoob (#桃心胸#) on Weibo in a few days time, there were only some dozen women who actually posted photos of their heart shaped breasts.

The ‘hype’ seems to have started with a live-streamer by the name of Ayi Xi Tai Lǜ (@阿姨洗太绿). (The name’s characters literally translate as “Aunty Washes Too Green” in Chinese, but the sound of the name resembles the Japanese ‘Ai Shiteiru’ (愛している), which means ‘I love you.’)

Screenshot of one of Aiyixitailu’s live broadcasts where she introduces the ‘heart-shape boob’ pose, via Weibo.

Ayi Xi Tai Lǜ is one of the thousands of girls who entertain their – mostly male – audiences from one of China’s 200-or-so live-broadcasting platforms. Popular ones that focus on girls broadcasting for male viewers include Huya, 9xiu, or Woxiu.

According to SupChina, it is common to see more seductive and racy content on these live-broadcasting platforms after midnight. Live-streamers can earn money from viewers purchasing virtual items for them, anything from ‘lollipops’ to ‘love.’

For Chinese authorities, these platforms are a source of concern because of, amongst others, their ‘obscenities.’ Over the past six months, they have already closed 73 illegal live streaming platforms and imposed life bans on 1,879 live streamers for providing pornographic content.

Aiyixitalu during one of her live-broadcasts.

An image of Ayi Xi Tai Lǜ turning her breast in a heart shape for viewers to see was shared on several Chinese message boards in July. It might have been this image that has inspired others to try and do the same.

“The A4 waist and so on are just over. The heart-shaped boob will be the next viral hit,”, some netizens say.

The A4 waist was a major online trend in March 2016, when hundreds of women posted pictures with an A4-size paper covering their waist to prove they were slimmer than a piece of paper. The trend received criticism for promoting an unhealthy body image.

Although it is said that the ‘A4 Waist’ challenge is out of fashion, the A4 photos are also still circulating on Weibo. Earlier this month, popular Chinese actress and model Zhang Tianai (张天爱) posted a photo of her tiny waist with the hashtag “I have an A4 Waist” (#我有A4腰# ). The photo received over 230.000 likes and 23.000 shares within a few days.

Not all people are happy with the alleged upcoming hype of the ‘Heart-Shaped Boob Challenge.’ Weibo user @Haoyyao noted: “If you try with small breasts, you won’t even be able to make a triangle.”

But there were also male netizens who tried to participate in the challenge anyway. Others jokingly proved that some men also have breasts and can join the challenge without any problems.

Some men also tried to take on the challenge.

“I’ll be able to do this – with the fat on my stomach,” one commenter said.

Despite all claims, it is not probable that this challenge will actually truly go viral. At the time of writing, the topic ‘Heart-Shaped Boob’ was receiving thousands of new views per minute (nearing 1.5 million views), but as netizens try to post their own challenge photos, they show up as (censored) empty images.

Censored images on Weibo: Chinese censors don’t seem to like heart-shaped breasts.

As much as people say this challenge is the next big hit, it is very likely that online censors will not allow it to be – unlike A4 waists, heart-shaped breasts don’t seem to be their cup of tea.

By Manya Koetse

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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3 Comments

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China Memes & Viral

Dutch Vlogger Discovers Her Boyfriend’s Photo on a Chinese TV Drama

Dutch vlogger Rianne Meijer was surprised to discover her boyfriend being somebody else’s lover in this Chinese television drama.

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The Dutch influencer Rianne Meijer has gone viral in the Netherlands and on Chinese social media after she posted a TikTok video in which she shared the discovery of her boyfriend’s photo in a Chinese TV drama.

“Remember this picture? This is a picture that I posted with my boyfriend a while ago,” Rianne says in the TikTok video, then showing a scene in Chinese TV drama in which a photoshopped photo of Rianne’s boyfriend is featured.

Although Rianne stood next to her boyfriend in the original photo, her face was replaced in the photoshopped edition featured on the Chinese TV drama.

“They look good together, it’s fine!” Rianne jokingly responded to the scene.

Rianne Meijer is an online influencer and YouTuber with some 1.5 million fans on her Instagram. She is known for often posting funny videos and photos, sometimes together with her boyfriend Roy.

The scene featuring Roy’s photo comes from the Chinese TV drama Summer Again (薄荷之夏), which premiered on iQiyi in the summer of 2021.

The scene shows a lady named Mi Ya (played by actress Li Borong 李柏蓉) talking about her relationship with a man named ‘Andre.’

On the Chinese social media site Weibo, many netizens found the incident “embarrassing” and did not understand why the staff would just steal someone’s portrait: “Couldn’t the production team even find a foreign guy to take a picture?”

Others also thought the incident was very funny: “This is the reality of our global village. You’d think nobody would find out, but it’s really not so secret.”

According to Rianne’s most recent Tiktok post update, the show’s production staff has since sent her an apology. She also writes it’s “all good,” adding: “They are so sweet and this gave us a good laugh.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

‘Anti-Square Dancing Device’ Goes Viral on Chinese Social Media

This tool might be a solution for Chinese residents experiencing ‘dancing grannies’ noise nuisance.

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The keyword is “反广场舞神器” – the tool that helps local residents find some peace and quiet when dancing grannies take over their public squares with loud music.

No matter where you go in China, from megacities to small towns, there inevitably will be a lively square dancing community. Local residents, usually older and retired residents, meet at a public park or plaza to perform synchronized dance routines together while playing loud music. Square dancing (广场舞) usually takes place in the mornings or in the evenings and is generally seen as a cheap way to stay fit and as a nice occasion to socialize with friends and neighbors.

Although most appreciate seeing the local ‘dancing grannies,’ there are also residents who find their rowdy gatherings annoying. During the time of national exams, for example, stressed-out students sometimes complain that they cannot focus on their studies due to the music blasting from the speakers. There are also others who are bothered by the music of the local dancing seniors.

This week, China’s ‘dancing grannies’ have again become a topic of discussion on social media after a video went viral in which a local resident in Jiangxi uses a special ‘anti-square dance tool’ to stop the music.

In the video, the man from the prefecture-level city of Yingtan (鹰潭) uses a small tool to mute the speakers of the square dancing group who have gathered below his apartment. The man, located in one of the higher apartments facing the square dancing, points his remote at the speakers and once it stops working, the dancing locals stop their activities and walk up and down trying to find out what is wrong with their music player.

Since the device works from a distance of 50-80 meters, anyone using the tool to stop the music won’t easily be discovered by the dancing grannies.

By now, the term ‘anti-square dance magical object’ (“反广场舞神器”) has been making its rounds on social media, with many netizens saying they also want to get this ‘magical tool.’

As described by Cnbeta.com, the device actually is just a powerful, long-distance remote control that can cause interference with some speakers.

On Chinese e-commerce platform Taobao, searches for the ‘anti-square dance device’ currently come up with dozens of results with remote controls, some advertising their product with the slogan: “Say goodbye to disturbance and have your quiet time.” Most ‘anti square dancing’ remote controls are sold for around 250 yuan ($38).

“Finally there’s a solution!”, some netizens write about the remote control. Others are also happy to discover the device, saying it’s the most peaceful way to create some silence when they experience nuisance; some mention that asking the ‘grannies’ to quiet down only results in being scolded anyway.

Others are jokingly predicting that hot sales of the device might result in a street war between opposing dancing groups silencing each other’s speakers.

There are also people who wonder why China’s square dancing grannies can’t just wear ‘silent disco’ headphones while dancing.

Some people warn users of the remote control that Chinese seniors will always find a way to continue square dancing: “You do this today, tomorrow they’re bringing their accordion!”

By Manya Koetse, with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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