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China Memes & Viral

Bizarre Video of Woman Urinating On FamilyMart Counter Goes Viral

Life of a FamilyMart shop assistant is not all roses. A bizarre video of a woman urinating on the counter of a FamilyMart right in front of the cashier is now making its rounds on Chinese social media.

Manya Koetse

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Life of a FamilyMart shop assistant is not all roses. A bizarre video of a woman urinating on the counter of a FamilyMart right in front of the cashier is now making its rounds on Chinese social media.

It is not easy being a FamilyMart shop assistant. A bizarre video is currently going viral on Chinese social media, where its description says: “A Taiwanese woman got into a dispute with a cashier at a supermarket. The woman came into the shop to go to the toilet, but when the shop assistant tells her he will take her there, she proceeds to step on the counter and urinates right there. Most remarkable is what she does afterward,…she drinks her own urine.”

urinating

The post was shared through diverse channels, including through video channel Miaopai and Huoji.

According to a Taiwanese news site, the video was originally shared within the closed ‘Baofei Community‘ on Facebook. The incident allegedly took place in the southern-western Taiwanese city of Kaohsiung.

“Just when you thought it couldn’t get any crazier, it does,” one netizen commented.

One Weibo netizen responds with shocked emoji’s, writing: “This news is just too intense.”

Netizens especially feel sorry for the shop assistant who did not only had to witness this ordeal but also is the one to clean up the mess.

The video that is going viral on Chinese social media.

Apparently, this is not the first FamilyMart peeing incident. According to this story by a blogger named Chickenboy, he witnessed a similar incident at the well-known Japanese convenience store earlier this year. On his Yabatori blog, Chickenboy writes:

“It was a regular night – or so I thought it would be – and I was headed toward Family Mart because my wallet was empty and the ATM there always has a bunch of money in it. I first saw you through the glass sliding doors and had two thoughts at the exact same time, which is rare for me. The first thought was hey, she’s kind of cute, and the second was damnit, I have to wait for someone to use the ATM. I took my place behind you and waited, but instead of typing a pin code, retrieving your money and walking out, you angrily punched the screen with both hands, then lost your balance and smashed your head on the dairy refrigerator. I realized then that you were extremely drunk.

What happened next is what really made the sparks fly. You turned to face me, our eyes met, and then you pulled down your pants. Right in the middle of a fucking Family Mart. But you didn’t stop there – you removed your panties as well, and then proceeded to urinate all over the receipt bin attached to the front of the cash machine. You attempted to get everything into the bin, but you have terrible aim because you don’t have a wiener, and it wouldn’t be long before you were sloshing around in a puddle of your own piss.

When other customers caught wind of what you were doing, they ran. But not me. I waited for you and I always will. Once the job was finished (…) you pulled up your pants and exited without a word, leaving me with nothing to remember you by but a massive puddle of pee.”

As the FamilyMart video is making its rounds on Sina Weibo, not everybody thinks the woman is completely crazy. “She is actually kinda cool. I like her,” one netizen writes.

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Fashion & Beauty

The Mulan Makeup Challenge: Traditional Chinese Makeup Goes Trending

Recreating the Mulan make-up look was the biggest beauty challenge on Chinese social media this July.

Manya Koetse

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Will traditional Chinese make-up make a comeback because of Disney’s Mulan?

Since Disney released the official trailer for its live-action Mulan movie earlier this month, Mulan is recurringly appearing in the top trending lists on Chinese social media.

Among all the different topics relating to the upcoming Mulan movie, the Mulan make-up challenge is one that jumps out this month.

The Disney live-action trailer showed a scene in which Mulan, played by Chinese American actress Crystal Liu Fei (刘亦菲), has a full face of betrothal makeup. The original animated Disney movie also features a full makeup Mulan.

Although there was also online criticism of the ‘exaggerated’ makeup, there are many people who appreciate Mulan’s colorful makeup look.

On Weibo, many showed off their skills in copying Mulan’s makeup look this month.

By now, the hashtags “Mulan Makeup Imitation” (#花木兰仿妆#) and “Mulan Makeup Imitation Contest” (#花木兰仿妆大赛#) have attracted over 300 million views.

Makeup such as lipstick has been used in China as far back as two or three thousand years ago.

Makeup vlogger Emma Zhou explains more about Tang Dynasty (618-907) makeup customs here; the skin would be whitened with rice flower, followed by the application of ‘blush’ (pigment of strong-colored flowers) to the cheeks and eyes in a round shape, to emphasize the roundness of the face.

A floral-like decoration would be placed in between the eyebrows.

The yellow forehead, as can be seen in the live-action Mulan, is also known as “Buddha’s makeup,” and was especially popular among ladies during the Tang Dynasty. A yellow aura on the forehead was believed to be auspicious (Schafer 1956, 419).

Although contemporary Chinese makeup trends are much different than those depicted in Mulan, traditional makeup seems to make somewhat of a come-back because of the Disney movie, with hundreds of Chinese netizens imitating the look.

Beauty bloggers such as Nico (@黎千千Nico, image below) receive much praise from Weibo users for their makeup look. Nico wrote: “I even opened the door for the delivery guy this way!”

It is not just girls imitating the look; there are also some boys showing off their Mulan makeup.

Although many still find the Mulan makeup look exaggerated and even “laughable,” there are also those who think it looks really “cool” – of course, depending on whether or not the application is successful.

Want to try it out for yourself? There are various amateur tutorials available on Youtube (in Chinese), such as here, here, or here.

The Mulan make-up hype will probably continue in 2020; the Mulan movie will come out in late March.

To read more about Mulan, please see our latest feature article on Mulan here.

By Manya Koetse

References

Schafer, Edward H. 1956. “The Early History of Lead Pigments and Cosmetics in China.” T’oung Pao, Second Series, 44, no. 4/5: 413-38. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4527434.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Celebs

Weibo Blows Up after Fan Bingbing Announces Breakup

It’s been a tough year for Chinese celebrity Fan Bingbing.

Manya Koetse

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First published

Two years after their engagement, Chinese actress Fan Bingbing and actor Chen Li have announced their breakup.

On the night of June 27 (China Standard Time), news came out that Chinese actress Fan Bing Bing is breaking up with her partner, Chinese actor Chen Li.

It was Fan herself who announced the separation through a post on social media, writing:

We go through all kinds of farewells during our lifetime. The love and warmth we gain throughout our encounters become everlasting forces. I want to thank you for all the love and support you’ve given me. Thank you for your care and love in the future. We are no longer ‘we’, but we are still ourselves.

The post soon received over 180,000 comments and more than 650,000 likes.

Chen Li also posted a message on his Weibo account, saying:

From friends to lovers, and now back to friends. Emotions can change, but the purest feeling between you and me will not change. The trust and support we have for each other will always be there. We are no longer ‘we’, but we are still ourselves.”

This breakup comes after a difficult year in Fan’s career. In summer of 2018, the 37-year-old actress was at the center of a social media storm due to a tax evasion scandal.

She disappeared from the public eye for months, and then returned with an emotional apology on Weibo.

The announcement of the split has triggered thousands of reactions on Weibo, where the hashtag “Fan Bingbing and Li Chen Split Up” (#范冰冰李晨分手#) had received 380 million views by Thursday night.

At time of writing, the breakup is dominating Weibo’s top trending topics, with many netizens commenting that Weibo is ‘exploding’ and that Weibo servers must be overheating due to the celebrity news.

It is often celebrity news that causes Weibo to blow up. A recent incident of Chinese teen idol smoking inside a Beijing restaurant also triggered millions of views and comments.

When Chinese singer and actor Lu Han announced his relationship with actress Guan Xiaotong in 2017, it even led to a rare temporary breakdown of Weibo’s servers.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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