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Boyfriend Who Cared for Comatose Girlfriend Turns Out To Be Her Abuser

One man made Chinese headlines in 2014 for borrowing RMB 200,000 (30,900$) to care for his girlfriend, who fell into a coma after a severe head injury. But now that the woman has miraculously woken up, she reveals a shocking story: her loving boyfriend was the one who caused her injuries.

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One man made Chinese headlines in 2014 for borrowing RMB 200,000 (30,900$) to care for his girlfriend who fell into a coma after a severe head injury. But now that the woman has woken up, she reveals that her loving boyfriend was the one who caused her injuries. The story has shocked netizens, who hope that China’s new law against domestic violence will bring justice to victims of abuse.

In 2014, Liu Fenghe touched the hearts of many Chinese netizens. After his girlfriend Lin Yingying received serious head injury and became comatose, the young man from the port city of Dalian stood by her side, and even bore a debt of RMB 200,000 (30,900$) to care of his girlfriend.

Liu’s faithfulness and persistence was extensively covered by Chinese media, and many netizens pointed to Liu’s story as proof that true love still exists in China today. The pictures of the caring Liu standing by his girlfriend’s sickbed were shared amongst netizens.

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But this love story took a shocking turn when Lin miraculously regained consciousness in May 2015. Lin’s family was overjoyed with her recovery, but they were then hit with a dark and terrifying truth; Lin’s ‘accident’ was a hard blow to the head by her boyfriend, Liu Fenghe.

The true story behind Lin’s injury has now been exposed by Chinese media, shocking Weibo’s netizens. Media report how Lin and Liu opened a bakery together shortly after they met. On the August 29th 2014, Lin accidentally burned twenty loaves. This supposedly made Liu so angry that he grabbed a large rolling pin and struck Lin hard in the back of her head. The blow left Lin seriously injured with blood coming from her ear, and she fell to the floor. According to Chinese media, Liu then called an ambulance, saying that Lin “fell over in the bakery”.

Lin Yingying also revealed that this was but one of many occasions where her boyfriend had beaten her. Liu Fenghe had previously punched Lin in the chest for playing a mobile game he didn’t like. Although Lin initially resisted Liu’s violence, she gradually came to endure his abuse in silence, fearing her parents’ reaction if they discovered her injuries.

Since Lin revealed her horrific experience, Liu Fenghe and his mother have been on the run. According to Tencent News, Lin’s father responded to the news with shock and commented: “As a person, you need to have a conscience. Why was he so cruel to my daughter? If he was the one who beat her, he should have admitted doing it.”

The news was shared on Weibo by many different media outlets, such as Legal Evening News, using the hashtag #Story Plot Twist (#剧情大反转#) Netizens reacted with outrage: “Nearly killing your girlfriend for burning bread? What kind of a monster is he?”

Another user commented: “The girl’s family should have called the police. I can’t believe they went all this time without knowing the truth.”

Other netizens called for Liu to be punished: “It’s time to carry out our domestic violence law.”

China’s very first law targeting domestic violence took effect at the beginning of this month, with the landmark legislation covering married couples and co-habiting couples, and including both physical and psychological abuse.

About a quarter of all Chinese women suffer domestic abuse during marriage, only 40,000 to 50,000 reports were approximately made each year, the Guardian reports. Like Lin Yingying, many victims remain silent to avoid bringing shame upon the family.

With domestic violence now formally being recognized in Chinese legislation, Weibo’s netizens express their hope that Liu, along with other perpetrators of domestic violence in China, will finally receive their just punishment.

By Anna Xue

Photos from news.qq.com

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Anna is a UK-based writer and translator who spent her early years in northeast China. She has a passion for the social stories unique to China and is fascinated by historical issues unfolding over the stage of Chinese social media.

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China Local News

Oil Tanker Truck Explosion Sends Shock Waves through Wenling, Zhejiang

A major oil tanker explosion has left over a hundred people injured and at least ten dead in Wenling, Zhejiang.

Manya Koetse

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On June 13, the explosion of an oil tanker truck has caused chaos in the city of Wenling in China’s Zhejiang province, leaving at least 112 127 people injured and nine 10 people dead.

The explosion took place in the afternoon at approximately 16:40 near the exit of the G15 Shenhai highway, causing a loud bang and wrecking some homes in the vicinity.

The hashtag “Zhejiang Wenling Tanker Wagon Explosion” (#浙江温岭槽罐车爆炸#) and other related hashtags (#浙江温岭一油罐车爆炸#) are attracting millions of views on social media site Weibo on Saturday evening (local time), with Chinese media and netizens sharing the footage of the damage caused by the explosion.

“My god, this is so scary,” a typical comment on Weibo says, with many people expressing their shock over the major incident.

Emergency and rescue workers are currently still at the scene to assist victims and clear away the wreckage caused by the explosion.

On Saturday night around 21:15 local time, Chiense state media outlet CCTV was still broadcasting a live stream through Weibo showing the latest images and footage of the situation and interviewing injured people in the hospital.

Local authorities and Chinese media are warning people not to go near Wenling’s Daxi to keep the roads clear for rescue workers.

Meanwhile, people on Chinese social media are spreading praying emoji’s and candles, expressing their sympathies for the victims of today’s explosion.

By Manya Koetse

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China Local News

China’s Shulan City in “Wartime Mode” after Recording 13 COVID-19 Infections

Local authorities announced a “wartime mode” lockdown due to 13 new local coronavirus cases in Shulan.

Manya Koetse

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The city of Shulan in China’s Jilin Province is top trending on Chinese social media today after local authorities announced a “wartime mode” lockdown due to 13 new local coronavirus cases.

These are the first local infections in the entire province after a period of 73 days, China News reports, with other previous cases all being infections from abroad.

Last week, on May 7th, a female resident was the first to be tested positive for COVID-19. The city in northeast China is now the only place in the PRC to be marked as “high risk.”

One page on social media platform Weibo dedicated to the topic of Shulan going into “wartime mode” (“战时状态”) had received over 190 million views by Monday evening local time.

What does this “wartime mode” entail?
– All residents stay home, lockdown of residential compounds
– All public places closed
– Schools closed
– All public transportation suspended
– No more selling of fever-reducing medicine in clinics or stores

According to CGTN, a total of 290 people who have been in close contact with the infected patients have been traced and placed under medical observation.

For more COVID-19 related articles, please click here.

By Manya Koetse (@manyapan)
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