Connect with us

China Health

Changchun Vaccine Scandal Causes Outrage on Weibo

Another vaccine scandal heightens parents’ distrust of vaccines.

Published

:

Within three years time, a third scandal has been exposed in the Chinese vaccine industry, adding to parents’ mistrust of vaccines in China.

A new vaccine scandal involving Changchun Changsheng, China’s second-largest producer of anti-rabies vaccines, has caused a tsunami of outrage and media coverage in China this week.

China’s State Food and Drug Administration found that the Jilin-based Changchun company did not only produce fake anti-rabies vaccines, but also substandard DPT vaccines, Caijing News reports on Weibo.

The news about Changchun’s violations already came out on July 15th, but especially led to a social media storm this weekend after reports leaked online exposing that the same company had already violated production laws as early as October of last year.

It is not the first time China faces serious problems in its vaccine programmes. In November of 2017, over 650,000 faulty – uneffective – vaccines were recalled in Shandong, Hebei and Chongqing.

In 2016, another scandal concerning the distribution of illegal and potentially deadly vaccines also became a major trending topic on Chinese social media.

It is mandatory for children to be vaccinated in line with the China National Immunization Programme.

At time of writing, the hashtag “Changchun Changsheng Counterfeit Vaccines” (#长春长生造假疫苗#) has already received over 49 million views on Weibo.

The current scandal adds to parents’ mistrust of vaccines in China, with thousands of people on Weibo demanding that those responsible for these violations should be given capital punishment.

On the various Weibo accounts of Chinese state media and local authorities, however, a post has been published that asks people to “not let anger and panic spread,” and to trust that “the relevant departments will deal with this issue in a timely manner.”

Various essays and comments threads about the faulty vaccines were no longer visible as of Sunday afternoon. While Beijing News reports that the Changchun vaccines were not used in Beijing, many questions still linger for worried parents in many other parts of the country.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

print

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
3 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

China Food & Drinks

BBC: Extreme Eating Trends and the Rise of Eating Disorders in China

The Food Chain by the BBC investigates the rise of eating disorders in China.

Published

:

The Food Chain by the BBC investigates the rise of eating disorders in China. What’s on Weibo editor Manya Koetse talks about some of China’s disturbing internet food trends in this recent episode.

The rise of eating disorders in China is the topic of a recent BBC online radio documentary episode (27 min) within the Food Chain series.

The Food Chain investigates the rise of eating disorders in China: is this an inevitable consequence of economic development? And if so, why are eating disorders still all too often seen as a rich white woman’s problem?

In the first of two episodes to explore the rising prevalence of eating disorders outside of the western world, Emily Thomas speaks to women with the illness in China and Hong Kong, who explain how hard it is to access support for binge-eating disorder, bulimia and anorexia, because of attitudes to food and weight, taboos around mental health, and a lack of treatment options. They describe the pressure on women to be ‘small’ and ‘diminutive’, but still take part in the country’s deeply entrenched eating culture.

A psychiatrist working in China’s only closed ward for eating disorders blames an abundance of food in the country, parental attitudes and the competitiveness of Chinese society. She also warns of the dangers of the uncontrolled diet pill industry. From there BBC delves into the sinister world of ‘vomit bars’ with Manya Koetse.

She tells Emily Thomas about the recent craze for live binge-eating among young Chinese women and how some of this is disturbingly followed by ‘purging’. Why do they call themselves ‘rabbits’? And why does no one use the term ‘eating disorder’ when talking about these trends?

BBC also explores the link between the rise of eating disorders and economic development. Does there need to be an abundance of food in a society before these problems develop?

To listen to a short fragment on China’s binge-eating rabbits by Manya Koetse, click here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/play/p06mw03b .

To listen to the full documentary, please click here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/play/p06mw03b.

Also read: Anorexia in China, and our article on Extreme Eating Trends.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

Continue Reading

China Health

Over 300 Children Sent to Hospital after Eating Expired Food in Kindergarten, Netizens Express Disbelief

After complaints of ‘smelly chicken,’ parents went to see for themselves what their children get to eat at school.

Gabi Verberg

Published

:

After eating expired rice vinegar, rice full of insects, and spoiled chicken legs at kindergarten, more than 300 children were sent to hospitals in Anhui and Jiangsu last week. The latest food scandal has led to disbelief among netizens.

Over the past week, the hashtag “Kindergarten’s Use of Expired Food Exposed” (#幼儿园被曝使用过期食品#) received over 39 million views on Chinese social media site Weibo. People are not just angered about yet another food scandal – they are especially shaken because it is young children that have become the victim of contaminated and expired food.

The food scandal occurred at kindergartens Tongxin (童馨) and Dedebei (得得贝) in Wuhu, Anhui province. Both kindergartens were led by the same principal, Mrs. Liang (梁).

During an on-the-spot investigation by several parents, some serious problems were discovered with the food served at the school, which later led to at least 300 children being sent to the hospital. Nine of these children were found to have health problems and were further examined at the Nanjing Children’s Hospital.

Parents first started noticing there was something wrong at their children’s school just after mid-September, when some children complained of stomach ache and the “smelly chicken legs” they ate at school. Several parents then went to inspect the food at the school canteen themselves, and discovered their children were served substandard food, including expired rice vinegar, refrigerated meat with a 2017 expiry date, and rice full of bugs. They immediately went to the school principal for an explanation and reported the incident to the local police station.

The discovery caused a great uproar among the parents of the kindergarten pupils. Many parents were reportedly unwilling to send their children back to school.

The kindergartens’ school board soon issued an apology letter, stating that the school would comply with any investigations. They also sent out a message to parents that the school would continue to stay open, and that they would make sure that the food would meet safety requirements.

Following a news conference on Sunday, Chinese state media reported on Tuesday, September 25, that police had detained the school principal for her role in the use of expired food in the school canteens.

Online, many netizens expressed their disbelief about the umpteenth time children have become the victim of safety scandals in China. “Do we even dare to send our children to kindergartens anymore?”, a popular comment said: “Do we even dare to have children at all?”

Besides various food scandals, Chinese parents have been particularly worried after other scandals were exposed over the last year, such as the various vaccine controversies, the RYB kindergarten abuse scandal, and the scandal involving a Ctrip kindergarten where children were force-fed wasabi.

One Weibo user said: “How can people treat children like this? How would they feel if their own children would be treated like this?” Another Weibo user wondered: “How far are people willing to go to make some extra money?”

“This is not the first time children are the victim of food scandals, and it won’t be the last time either,” one Weibo user wrote: “I just hope that the concerning institutes will try their best to protect our children.”

There were also many netizens referring to health safety scandals concerning children in earlier years, writing: “The milk powder scandal, the vaccine scandal, and now infected rice full of insects. Our children must be tired already; it might be better for them to grow up as soon as possible.”

According to news reports, investigations by the China Food and Drug Administration into this matter are still ongoing. All children who have been examined at the hospital, including those who have been admitted, are currently in stable condition.

By Gabi Verberg

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement

Follow on Twitter

Advertisement

About

What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

Contribute

Got any tips? Or want to become a contributor? Email us as at info@whatsonweibo.com.
Advertisement