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China Memes & Viral

Watch: This China-based Black Man is Fed Up With 3 Major Things

A short video by a black man who has been living in China for three years is making its rounds on Chinese social media. Speaking in Chinese, the young man talks about three things he is really fed up with in China in relation to the color of his skin.

Manya Koetse

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https://youtu.be/IZaUka4Kmk4

A short video by a black man who has been living in China for three years is making its rounds on Chinese social media. Speaking and swearing in Chinese, the young man talks about three things he is really fed up with in China in relation to the color of his skin.

Just when a Chinese laundry commercial caused big controversy for being “completely racist”, a short video by a black man living in China has gone viral on Sina Weibo.

In the video, the New Yorker, who is said to have been living in China’s Chongqing for three years, talks about three things that he is really fed up hearing.

The video was posted on Weibo by ‘Master Pi‘ on May 30 through the Miaopai video app. The original video was posted on May 29 by the New Yorker himself, who calls himself ‘Li Heishuai’.

In the video, the young man says:

Hi Everyone (..), I’m from New York in America. I want to talk to you about three things that make me really uncomfortable. The first is when I come to many places here, people will say ‘hey black devil’. What?! Your mother’s pussy! Don’t call me black devil! It is really very disrespectful. I hate it.”

He continues:

The second thing (..)..fuck..(..) is that sometimes people will ask me (…) where I am from. When I tell I am from NY, USA, they will say ‘that’s impossible, aren’t they all white there in America?’ (..) Hello, Obama?! Isn’t he a black man?! What about Will Smith, isn’t he black? What about Kobe Bryant? Isn’t he black? I hate it.”

[rp4wp]

Then he says:

The third thing, is that sometimes men will often ask me if I’m big down there. Fuck! The next time somebody asks me this, I will take off my pants and let him see for himself!

Within one day, the video has already been shared over 25000 times, receiving over 15400 comments on Weibo and 19000 on Miaopai, with most netizens appreciating the man’s humor, his Chinese proficiency, and Sichuan dialect.

Although some netizens think he’s “cute” and others are “laughing out loud”, there are also those who are upset with the young man using swear words and call him “low”. One commenter says: “He swears better in Chinese than I do.”

“It’s funny but he is right,” one commenter says: “Don’t call black people ‘black devils’, it is very rude and uncivil.”

As some netizens are calling out the young man or talking about his appearance, a female Weibo user responds: “I really don’t get why people can be so low. You only evaluate others by saying they’re ugly. But I think this black man is very funny and cute, and moreover, he addresses a problem that is recurrent in China. ‘Black devil’ really is rude, and he’s found a way to make his statement with humor. You can scold him, but it only makes you ugly.”

Apart from talking about ‘Li Heishuai’s’ words, there are also some netizens that are still wondering about the third point addressed by him.

“Hey handsome,” another netizen comments: “You’ve gone viral now.”

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Avatar

    DIANDIAN GUO

    May 30, 2016 at 9:47 pm

    The first point is genuine impoliteness, but Chinese also address Japanese as 鬼子,Koreans as 棒子,Russians as 毛子… it is disrespectful, with a sense of superiority, but no one says Chinese discriminate against Japanese or Russian. The second point is genuine ignorance. The last… Genuine ignorance plus a vulgar curiosity…
    I think either racist or not, it takes much more time when China get enough foreign exposure on the life world level, before the issue of transcultural/multicultural can be really on the agenda. I doubt whether anti-racism can be an preemptive. It has always bee remeditory hasn’t it.

  2. Avatar

    Thomas Jones

    May 31, 2016 at 5:01 am

    While I think that PC in the west has gone out of control, this guy makes some good points as China upon first glance appears to be the complete opposite, which is also just as bad.

    For starters, making comments like “white devil”, “black devil”, any sort of “devil”, “wide nose”, “big lips”, or for westerners/Arabs and sometimes even Indians “big nose” is EXTREMELY offensive, yet Chinese think little about saying such nasty things. While it’s not an everyday occurrence, but I’ve had Chinese who I’ve asked for directions say straight up me and my friends have “big noses”; friends of a friend sitting around us at a dinner table commented on my nose while having dinner at a fancy restaurant. The husband of my former boss taught his young son to look at my nose to the point that 3 years later at my wedding the first thing the then 6 year old said is “wow, what a big nose” (他的鼻子好大).

    These comments are dehumanizing, demoralizing and just plain offensive. China doesn’t need PC like we have in the west, but it does need to learn some basic human decency and manners. Do they have any idea how some of us feel, when we become so self-conscious that we can barely function properly in China because locals are so rude and distasteful in their comments just based upon the way we look? I wouldn’t walk down the street in Sydney, Los Angeles, San Francisco or Toronto and call Chinese “slant eyes” or “small nose” what makes them think it’s OK to abuse us foreigners when we’re in their country?

    As for the “only white people in America” comment, that’s just hilariously ignorant. One look at any American film made since the 1960s shows that America is a very diverse society – can’t believe Chinese would believe the west is just a “white” version of China. Our societies are completely opposite in this respect and I’m pretty sure most Chinese would have seen at least one Hollywood film or at least have been taught something about our societies. Evidently this doesn’t apply to everyone.

    • Avatar

      samy hung

      August 28, 2016 at 7:36 am

      Five thousands years of civilization is destroyed by the communism through this past 60 years of ruling. Please forgive.

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China Health & Science

China’s COVID-19 Vaccine Freebies: Get One Vaccine, Get Milk & Eggs for Free!

“Do I get free transport and a freebie with that vaccine?”

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While American vaccine incentives – where some counties would offer a free beer and fries to encourage more Americans to get the COVID-19 vaccine – made international headlines, Chinese vaccine incentives have also been attracting the attention on Weibo and beyond.

Forget about free beer and fries. How about getting free milk, eggs, toilet paper, laundry detergent, or sesame oil after getting your shot? In China, and especially in Shanghai, some local vaccine sites have been offering all kinds of noteworthy freebies to encourage citizens to come and get their shots.

Since March and April of this year, netizens are sharing photos of COVID-19 vaccine posters online, such as this one, where you get a carton of milk after getting vaccinated:

Or these, where you get free vegetable oil or sesame oil:

Or how about two boxes of eggs?

One local initiative even offered free toilet paper earlier this year:

Another place in Shanghai offered bags of rice for free with your shot:

And others offered free pick-up services to those getting vaccinated:

Here you see people leaving with their milk cartons (and vaccinated!):

The freebies were meant to encourage more people to get their shots. But because of recent new COVID-19 cases in places like Anhui and Liaoning, more people are now in a rush to get vaccinated. Viral videos and posts on social media showed long queues at vaccine sites.

Popular WeChat account Xinwenge (新闻哥) reported a rapid shift in attitudes among young people towards getting the vaccine, from “do I get free transport and a freebie with that vaccine?” to “I’ll stand in line and do anything as long as I can get vaccinated.”

“Confirmed local cases will motivate people more [to get the vaccine] than eggs and milk,” one blogger from Guangdong wrote on Weibo.

Despite the surge of people going out to get their vaccine, some places still offer vaccine freebies. On social media, people are sharing the photos of their ‘vaccine souvenirs’; plastic bags with milk and cookies.

One Weibo user writes: “I was never so enthusiastic about getting my shot, until I heard they offered free milk and laundry detergent.”

Another Weibo user also shows off their ‘vaccine present’, getting free milk, soap, and rice with their COVID-19 vaccine: “And I didn’t even have to stand in line!”

By Manya Koetse & Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

Train Fight Between Chinese and Foreign Passenger over Mask-Wearing Goes Viral on Douyin

A video that shows a foreign man yelling at a Chinese woman on the high-speed train has gone viral on Chinese social media.

Manya Koetse

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“She is not the owner of the train! Shut up!” A short video of a quarrel on a train between a foreign man and a Chinese woman has gone viral on Chinese social media.

In the video, a Chinese woman can be heard yelling to a foreign man, saying: “Why can he go without a face mask?! Does he have special privilege? What is he doing in China if he doesn’t follow the rules?” The man then says: “She needs to shut up, she is harassing me!” A train attendant standing in between the passenger seats tries to calm down both passengers.

The incident reportedly took place on the G7530 high-speed train from Ninghai to Shanghai on May 5, where a dispute started over the man allegedly refusing to wear a face mask. The man does wear a face mask in the video.

The video went viral on Douyin, the Chinese TikTok, and also made its rounds on Kuaishou and Weibo (#阿姨怒怼不戴口罩外籍乘客#, #外籍男子未戴口罩还狂怼邻座阿姨#, #官方回应老外乘高铁拒戴口罩#).

The video sparked some anti-foreign sentiments on Weibo, where some commenters called the man a “foreign devil” or “foreign trash,” with others condemning his aggressive behavior and telling him to get out of China.

Shanghai Railways addressed the incident on its social media channel, confirming that the train conductor on the G7530 train indeed came across two passengers arguing because the foreign man was not wearing his mask correctly. In the post, the railways reminded all passengers to properly wear their masks while on the train.

Among the hundreds of people commenting on the statement, there are many who feel the train staff have been too lenient with the passenger.

This is not the first incident where foreigners make it to the (local) news in China for not wearing a mask. In April of 2020, a foreign man was detained in Beijing after he attempted to walk into a neighborhood community without a mask and then became aggressive with local security guards who wanted him to wear a face mask.

In December of 2020, another foreign man was filmed and triggered online anger as he walked around Wenzhou station not wearing a face mask, without anyone reminding him to wear one.

When it comes to train fights, the most famous ones are that of the ‘high speed train tyrant’ and the ‘train tyrant women.’ Both passengers went viral in 2018 for refusing to give up their seats although they were assigned to other passengers. At the time, both passengers were fined for their unruly behavior.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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