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China Memes & Viral

Graduation Photos of Only Girl in All-Male Class Go Viral

The only woman on the team at this Mechanical Manufacturing programme is honored by her classmates.

Manya Koetse

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This only girl in a class at the Wuchang Institute of Technology is treated like a princess by her classmates.

The creative graduation photos of a class consisting of 35 boys and just one girl have become a top trending topic on Sina Weibo on November 3.

The pictures were taken at the Wuchang Institute of Technology, where this class studied Mechanical Manufacturing.

To honor the only girl in the class, the group decided to take photos centering around their ’empress,’ including some photos in which she wore a wedding dress.

“They all adore her, she must be so happy,” one among thousands of commenters wrote.

But some netizens also consider the downsides to being the only girl in the class: “Skipping class must be a problem for her.”

Unconventional graduation photos are becoming more popular in China. Earlier this year, the graduation picture of a mom-to-be from Sichuan also went viral. The text on her belly says: “WE are graduating.”

By Manya Koetse

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©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Argo

    November 16, 2017 at 5:23 pm

    It must be a VERY special experience for the girl! Wish her all the best.

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China and Covid19

Happiest Lockdown in China: Guests Undergo Mandatory Quarantine at Shanghai Disneyland Hotel

“I wish I could be quarantined at Disney too!” The Shanghai Disney hotel apparently is the happiest place to get locked in.

Manya Koetse

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While many cities across China are experiencing new (partial) lockdowns and millions of people are confined to their homes, there was also a group of people that had to undergo mandatory quarantine at a very special place: the Shanghai Disneyland Hotel.

On September 7, social media posts started surfacing online from people who said they were required to quarantine while they were at the Shanghai Disneyland hotel. Disneyland reportedly had received a notification from the local health authorities that a visitor who previously stayed at the Disneyland hotel was found to be a close contact of a newly confirmed Covid case.

In line with the Center for Disease Control requirements, Disney created a ‘closed loop system’ by locking in all hotel residents and staff members and doing daily Covid tests. While the Disneyland theme park was open as usual, the hotel became a temporary isolation site where people’s health would be monitored for the next few days while all staff members would also be screened.

During their mandatory quarantine, guests stayed at the hotel for free and did not need to pay for their rooms. Room prices at the Shanghai Disneyland hotel start at around 3000 yuan/night ($433).

Some guests shared photos of their Disneyland quarantine stay on social media, showing how Disney staff provided them with free breakfast, lunch, a surprise afternoon tea, delicious dinner, fun snacks, and Disney toys and stickers.

On the Little Red Book (Xiaohongshu) app, one Shanghai Disney visitor (nickname @恶霸小提莫) wrote: “We have three meals a day, there is both Chinese and Western-style breakfast, we also get afternoon tea and desserts, they have shrimp, beef, scallops, drinks, French macarons, yogurt, ice cream, and much more. We watched so many Disney movies for free. We are given so many little gifts, they brought us gifts twice today as they also brought us toy figures at night. We watch the fireworks from our windows every night at 8.30 pm. Although we weren’t allowed to go out, we really had a pleasant stay.”

Another Disney guest named Zoea (Xiaohongshu ID: yiya0313) also shared many photos of the mandatory quarantine and wrote: “When the staff knocked on the door to tell me they were bringing dinner, I even wondered how it was possible that they brought food again. Afternoon tea during quarantine, can you believe it? And fruit before dinner? And midnight snacks brought to us after dinner? And it was so nice to watch all the Disney movies on tv. Disney really is the most magical place.”

“I’m just so happy,” another locked-in Disney guest posted on social media, sharing pictures of Mickey Mouse cakes.

Other guests also posted about their experiences on social media. “They probably feared we would get bored so they brought us glue, stickers, and painting brushes, the kids loved it and so did we!”

Reading about the happy quarantine at Disney, many Weibo users responded that they envied the guests, writing: “I wish I could be quarantined at Disney too.”

“I need to find a way to get in, too,” others wrote.

Earlier this year, one Chinese woman shared her story of being quarantined inside a hotpot restaurant for three days. Although many people also envied the woman, who could eat all she wanted during her stay, she later said she felt like she had enough hotpot for the rest of her life.

By Manya Koetse 

 

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China Memes & Viral

This Company in Shenzhen Won’t Hire People Who Bring ‘Bad Luck’

This company doesn’t wanna risk trouble with employees with the number ‘5’ in their phone number.

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An education company located in Shenzhen went trending on Weibo after its director demanded that new employees’ phone numbers cannot have the number ‘5’ as the 5th digit, based on the superstition that it will bring bad luck.

Counting back from the end, is the fifth digit of your phone number ‘5’? If so, this Chinese employer probably does not want to hire you. This topic recently triggered discussions on Chinese social media.

Chinese media outlet Jiupai News (九派新闻) reported that a recruiter for an education company in Shenzhen, Guangdong, asked potential new employees whether their phone number had the number 5 as its 5th digit (counting down). If so, as per the boss’s request, they would not be hired unless they would change their phone number.

“The number on this resume is not ok.” Screenshot of recruitment conversation shared by Jiuwen News.

The news immediately spread around Weibo under the hashtag “Company Doesn’t Hire People Whose Phone Number Has 5 as 5th Digit” (公司不聘用手机号倒数第五位是5的人), which temporarily became the number one trending topic in Weibo’s ‘hot search’ list.

The remarkable employer’s request caused some heated discussions among netizens regarding superstitions in the workplace. The case was all the more surprising to some because the company is specialized in education.

According to blogger Jimenjun (@奇门君), who focuses on astrology and numerology, this particular request is probably derived from the ancient Chinese divination text I Ching or Yi Jing, also known as the Book of Changes and the idea of multiple 5s being unfavorable. Jimenjun explains that persons with the ‘five as fifth position’ might easily clash with their superiors and bring bad luck to their boss.

Jimenju writes that although the request might seem strange, it could also be a way to see to what extent a future employee is willing to adapt to their work and listen to requests from a manager.

Although many joked about the superstition in the comment section, there are also many netizens who would rather be safe than sorry: “My mum told me that it would be best if my phone number did not contain a 0 or 5, so there’s not a single 5 in there.” Another person wrote: “I have three 5s! How dreadful!”

China has a lot of superstitions and traditional beliefs, which are also noticeable in the process of job hunting. When searching for key terms “superstitions” and “job hunting” on Chinese search engine Baidu, there are over 21 million results, including countless do’s and don’ts and more online discussions on the matter.

One Weibo user shared that among the many remarkable job-hunting stories they heard from friends, there was one where an employer would not hire any employees born under the zodiac sign of the Monkey.

While some netizens say it’s not a big deal to change a phone number,there are also those who think such requests cross a boundary and are weird and senseless.

Some argue that, no matter how relevant or deeply-rooted superstitions are in Chinese society, a future employee should never be evaluated based on a number but based on their skills and mentality: “It’s the 21st century, and there are still such superstitious bosses. Why don’t you just hire a fortune-telling Feng-shui Master?”

By Federica Giampaolo and Manya Koetse

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Featured photo by Franck on Unsplash

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©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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