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China Local News

A Kuaidi’s Pain – Package Courier Severely Beaten for Being Five Minutes Late

An express courier from Zhuzhou, Hunan, has suffered permanent injuries after being severely beaten by the woman he was delivering a package to. According to multiple reports on Weibo, the courier – called kuaidi in China – was beaten for being five minutes late.

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An express courier from Zhuzhou, Hunan, has suffered permanent injuries after being severely beaten by the woman he was delivering a package to. According to multiple reports on Weibo, the courier – called kuaidi in China – was beaten for being five minutes late. Couriers in China often work long hours for low pay under unsafe conditions.

On July 28, courier Guo Junliang (郭君良1) from Zhuzhou phoned up a woman named Yan X. to tell her he was coming over with her package in 2-3 minutes. The woman, waiting at the bottom of the building, was so agitated when the courier arrived five minutes later than expected, that she started hitting him with her umbrella.

The story has attracted much attention on Weibo, where it momentarily became a top trending topic (#快递员迟到5分钟被打#) on July 31.

As the woman was beating the courier, another man at the scene reportedly came over and also started hitting and kicking the kuaidi. The abuse left Guo Junliang, who works for ZTO Express (中通快递), with permanent internal injuries. As a result, he is now suffering from incontinence.

 

“She beat him because the weather was ‘very hot’ and she was ‘on her period’.”

 

The woman told Chinese reporters that she lost her temper and beat him because the weather was “very hot” and because she was “on her period.” She also said she regretted the incident. Local police are now investigating the case.

On Weibo, many people are commenting on this story: “I often have couriers coming to my door, and I really appreciate how hard they work in high temperatures. We have to be more considerate of them,” a netizen named Lapkit said.

“This society is really sick. People only care about fulfilling their own desires, without considering the difficulties of others. Very selfish!”, another Weibo user wrote.

It is not easy being a courier in China, a country that has the world’s largest market for package delivery. Earlier this year, New York Times featured an article about the life of couriers in China.

 

“Nearly 25% of China’s couriers work over 12 hours a day, seven days a week.”

 

The article says there are around 1.2 million kuaidi , or express delivery, in China. They are mostly unskilled workers from China’s rural areas. Although nearly 25% of China’s couriers work over 12 hours a day, seven days a week, their work is often low-paid and unsafe.

Guo Junliang cried as he spoke to TV reporters from the hospital. “We are out in the burning sun for hours, and she says she is already tired from standing outside for 2-3 minutes. This behavior towards couriers really is abominable.”

Guo also said he still had received no apologies. Many commenters on Weibo said they found the incident “inconceivable.”

“Her phone number should be blacklisted by all delivery companies so that no kuaidi ever needs to serve her again,” many wrote.

By Manya Koetse

1 According to written media reports, the name is Guo Junliang (郭君良), but in his tv interview the courier was cited as Peng Junliang (彭君良).

Featured image http://www.cnfffff.com/

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, Sino-Japanese relations and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Local News

Woman Kicked Out on Highway Off-ramp by Boyfriend over Spring Festival Argument

He put her out of the car, but their relationship is still on.

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News of a Chinese woman being kicked out of the car beside a high-speed road by her boyfriend is making its rounds on Weibo today. What many netizens are especially astonished about, is that the couple is still together.

On February 20, Chinese newspaper People’s Daily reported on Weibo that a woman was kicked out of the car by her boyfriend on Sunday while driving home to celebrate Chinese New Year.

The incident occurred at the Zhejiang Hangzhou highway. Local traffic police spotted the woman walking by herself on the off-ramp, carrying a suitcase.

The woman reportedly was visibly upset and told the police that she was on her way to her Anhui hometown with her boyfriend when they got into an argument and he kicked her out of the car.

Footage of the woman wandering about the side of the highway was published on Weibo by online media outlet Pear Video, and was shared hundreds of times on Chinese social media on Tuesday.

As reported by various Chinese news outlets, the woman’s boyfriend was later tracked down by police and apologized for leaving his girlfriend beside the highway. After a police mediation, the couple still continued their way to the New Year’s festivities together.

“Why didn’t she break up with him?!” many commenters on the news wonder.

“If you’re looking for a marriage partner, don’t pick him from a garbage dump,” some wrote.

Others warn the woman that her boyfriend’s current actions are a bad omen for the future: “Now he’ll throw you out of the car together with your suitcase, later he’ll throw you out of the car together with your child.”

“If there’s a first time, there’ll always be second time,” many netizens also said.

In 2016, a fighting couple also shocked the online community when footage of a man putting his wife in the back of his car trunk at a Hebei gas station went viral on Weibo.

A day after the incident, the woman said she would not press charges against her own husband, igniting discussions over whether or not the man should be punished anyway for the abuse – regardless of whether or not she would press charges.

As for the couple in today’s new feature, most netizens just hope for one thing: “Whatever you do, do not marry him!”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Local News

Shanghai Police Releases Surveillance Footage of Dumbest Burglars Ever

If all burglars were this stupid, the police wouldn’t need to work overtime.

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On February 14, the official Weibo account of the Shanghai Public Security Bureau (@上海市公安局官方微博) released a video on its channel that is going viral on Chinese social media today. The video was captured through surveillance cameras after midnight.

The video shows two burglars attempting to break in when something goes terribly wrong – see the video for yourself, although some viewer discretion is advised.

“If all burglars were like this, we wouldn’t need to work overtime,” the Shanghai Public Security Bureau writes.

“You might not need to work overtime, but the nurses and doctors at the hospital surely will,” some netizens reply.

The video was watched 4 million times shortly after it was published on Weibo. Further information on how the unfortunate burglar is currently doing has not been released.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

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