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Palace Museum Says Goodbye to Forbidden City Celebrity Cat Baidian

The most beloved stray cat of the Forbidden City has suddenly passed away.

Manya Koetse

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Baidian by pet photographer Arthur Yang @宠物摄影师-克查 / follow on Instagram: roulong

Baidian, the famous red-haired stray cat from the Forbidden City that predicted World Cup winners, has passed away on Monday. Palace Museum staff thanks netizens for their care and support.

The “imperial” stray cat Baidian became an online hit recently when staff from the Palace Museum, housed in the Forbidden City, started posted pictures of him ‘predicting’ World Cup winners.

The cat was the first Forbidden City stray to even get its own Weibo account, which soon gathered more than 17,000 followers.

Unfortunately, Baidian fell ill on Wednesday and had to be taken to the animal hospital. Although Palace staff and the veterinarians were initially hopeful about his recovery, a severe anemia worsened the cat’s condition, that was already weakened due to a heart problem and his advanced age.

One of the last photos taken of Baidian.

Palace Museum staff called out for help on Sunday, as Baidian needed a blood transfusion; they were looking for young, strong, and healthy blood type A cats who could donate.

Despite hundreds of responses, the Baidian Weibo account posted a sad message today, writing: “Thank you for all your help. We’re so sorry – we had to let him go.”

“Thank you all,” Palace staff wrote on Weibo.

Baidian’s passing has moved many people on Weibo, with hundreds of commenters responding to his sudden passing. “I always used to see him around the West gate of the Forbidden City,” one person said: “He would defend the gate and from time to time people would stop and pet him. He would majestically lie down and be stroked (..) Farewell Baidian!”

Baidian by pet photographer Arthur Yang One Shot @宠物摄影师-克查 / follow on Instagram: roulong

“I’m happy I could see you one last time,” another Palace Museum visitor writes, posting a photo she took of Baidian.

“I just started following you on Weibo, and never thought I would see this sad news,” one commenter says. Some people suggest that the Palace Museum staff keeps Baidian’s Weibo account open for other stray cats that live in the imperial palace.

Baidian by pet photographer Arthur Yang @宠物摄影师-克查 / follow on Instagram: roulong

“It is ok,” other people say: “You’ve done all you could for him, now he’s no longer in pain.”

Baidian by pet photographer Arthur Yang One Shot @宠物摄影师-克查 / follow on Instagram: roulong

“There’s no pain in kitty heaven.”

By Manya Koetse

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©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Local News

Pregnant Woman Throws Scalding Soup over Baby Girl in Malatang Restaurant

Manya Koetse

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An incident that occurred in Zhoukou city in China’s Henan province on the night of June 11 has gone viral on Chinese social media today.

Security cameras in a malatang (hot spicy soup) restaurant captured the moment a pregnant woman throws a bowl of hot soup at an 11-month-old girl.

The woman was allegedly annoyed because the baby was making noise by banging on the table with a spoon.

Footage making its rounds on social media shows how other customers in the restaurant stand up after witnessing the incident, with some going after the woman.

The baby girl reportedly sustained burn injuries on her back and buttocks.

According to various Chinese media reports, the culprit is a 28-year-old woman by the name of Ren. She received a 15-day prison sentence and a fine of 500 yuan ($72), but will not be detained at this point because she is pregnant.

See the video of the incident here:

The local public security bureau issued a statement on Weibo today, writing that the incident had occurred when Ren was dining at the restaurant together with her husband. She got into an argument with the other diners when their 11-month-old baby would not stop banging on the table.

Shortly after leaving the restaurant with her husband, the pregnant Ren then suddenly returned and threw the hot soup at the family, hurting the baby girl.

On social media, outraged commenters write that they think the woman will not be a good mother: “How can a woman like this raise a child?”

“This makes my hair stand up in anger! It’s just a baby!” others write.

The story is somewhat similar to another incident that went viral on Chinese social media last year, when a pregnant woman intentionally tripped a 4-year-old boy in a malatang restaurant in Baoji (watch video below for the full story).

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Insight

Zhejiang Movie Theatre Displays Blacklisted Individuals in Avengers Movie Preview

A special ‘trailer’ before the Avengers movie premiere showed the audience blacklisted individuals.

Manya Koetse

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A local movie theatre in the city of Lishui, Zhejiang province, showed a noteworthy ‘trailer’ before the Avengers: End Game premiere on April 24.

Chinese state tabloid Global Times reports that the sold-out premiere had a ‘surprise’ moment just before the movie was about to start: a short Public Service Announcement by the Liandu district court of Lishui displayed people who are currently on a ‘debt dodging black list.’

The short film also informed the cinema audience of potential consequences of being on a blacklist, including no traveling abroad, and no traveling by air or on high-speed trains.

According to Global Times, the local district court has registered a total of 5478 people on its blacklist since 2018.

The names and faces of more than 300 people on this list have reportedly been displayed on cinema screens, public LED screens, and on buildings. Allegedly 80 of them have since complied with court orders.

As part of China’s emerging Social Credit system project, there are public court-issued lists of ‘trust-breaking enforcement subjects’ (信被执行人名单), referring to people or companies who have failed to comply with court orders.

Individuals on the judgment defaulter blacklist system run by the court system, whose information is publicized, can risk having their photos and names displayed on local LED screens on courthouses or other buildings (Dai 2018, 26).

Blacklisted individuals on a Wuxi building (via Phoenix News).

Beyond that, they will face restrictions in various ways, from being denied bank credit to being restricted from staying in high-end hotels or traveling by air.

On Weibo, the Global Times post on the noteworthy cinema preview received over 4000 shares. The same news was also reported by CCTV and Phoenix News.

Some commenters joke about the Public Service Announcement, saying: “Blacklisters [can now say]: Mum! I was on TV! On a big IMAX screen! Together with the Avengers!”

Others leave comments in support of the measure, calling it “creative,” and saying: “This is good, we should implement this all across the country.”

“Blacklisters should be displayed on all kinds of platforms.”

“This is for people to lose on their social credit,” another commenter writes: “If you don’t want to ‘socially die’ then just fulfill your duties.”

But not everyone agrees. “People are buying a movie ticket to see their film,” one person says: “They suddenly get exposed to this kind of content that has nothing to do with them, what about their rights as a consumer?”

By Manya Koetse

References

Dai, Xin, Toward a Reputation State: The Social Credit System Project of China (June 10, 2018). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3193577 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3193577 [5.3.19].

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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