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“Mommy’s Washcloth” – Shanghai School Uses Dirty Sex Joke to Teach Kids English

This Shanghai school gave its pupils some noteworthy homework.

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This Shanghai school has provided its students with a sexual joke as a “light and funny” text to study English. Chinese netizens are now making a joke of the school and the book it uses.

A private international school in Shanghai has given its 8th-grade students some remarkable homework to study English this winter holiday. Spoiler: it’s about pubic hair and extramarital sex.

The English text in the book, that has now gone viral on Chinese social media, is called “Mommy’s Washcloth” (妈妈的抹布). It is listed in the category “light and funny” and goes as follows:

 

Mommy’s Washcloth

There was a little boy whose mother was about to have a baby. One day the little boy walked in and saw his mother naked, he asked his mother what was the hair in between her legs? She responded, “It’s my washcloth.” Weeks later after the mother had the baby, the young boy walked in on his mother again, but while she was in the hospital the doctor shaved her pubic hair, and the boy asked his mother: “What happened to your washcloth?” The mother responded, “I lost it.”

The little boy, trying to be helpful, set out to find his mother’s washcloth. A few days later the little boy went running to his mother yelling and screaming, “I found your washcloth!” The mother thinking that the child was just playing went along with the boy and asked, “Where did you find it?” The boy answered, “The maid has it and she’s washing daddy’s face with it.”


 

The homework assignment was for children to write down their thoughts on the story.

The joke itself is not new; a quick online search shows that it has since long been featured on various websites listing ‘dirty jokes.’

The remarkable text started attracting the attention of netizens when parents complained about it in various WeChat groups. It was then picked up by Chinese news outlet Caixin on January 23rd.

The joke is reportedly featured in the 2018 version of a homework textbook that was originally published in 2009 by Beijing Atomic Energy Press, and has been distributed nationwide. The book is focused on stimulating pupils to learn English in a “light,” “creative,” and “active” way.

The Chinese translation of the text is making its way around Chinese social media.

The school that gave its pupils this homework is the SMIC Private School (中芯学校), which, somewhat ironically, says in its mission statement that: “It is our belief that students should be instilled with proper values, and schools share in this responsibility.”

Although the Shanghai school was not available for comments, Sina News reports, the Beijing publishing house did give a statement today, saying they were aware of the issue and were in the process of recalling the textbook.

On Weibo, however, many people seem to appreciate the “creative” English texts and find it funny.

Others just complain about the language difficulty level of the joke: “As a university student, I must admit, I still can’t understand this,” one person wrote, with others adding: “Surely the pupils won’t be able to understand it anyway!”

This is not the first time a Chinese textbook causes controversy online for its content. In 2017, a sexual education textbook caused a stir in China for being “too explicit.”

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

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©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

Stories that are authored by the What's on Weibo Team are the stories that multiple authors contributed to. Please check the names at the end of the articles to see who the authors are.

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    K Het

    January 25, 2019 at 3:45 pm

    Most students won’t understand this joke, but there are certainly a few who did. I have 13 year old students who have gone to English cram schools their whole lives and would understand every single word in this joke except “pubic”, which they could easily look up on their phone dictionaries. I doubt they would get the punchline, but they would certainly understand how sexual the joke was.

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China Society

Calls for Action against School Violence in China after Group Attack on 12-Year-Old Girl Video Goes Viral

Another incident shows the gravity of China’s school bullying problem.

Manya Koetse

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Footage showing a brutal beating of a 12-year-old girl in Yunnan has sparked anger on Chinese social media, leading to widespread calls to step up the fight against school violence in China.

A bystander video showing various boys beating up a girl in Chuxiong, Yunnan, has gone viral on Chinese social media.

The footage (linkviewer discretion advised) shows how at least three different young men kick and beat the girl while laughing, continuing their assault when she is laying on the ground.

One hashtag page relating to the topic received over 500 million views on Weibo today.

According to various Chinese media reports, the incident occurred on May 25 in Lufeng county, Chuxiong, Yunnan Province. Four boys from 14 to 15 years old attacked the 12-year-old girl after they had an argument at school. The beating took place right after schooltime at an off-campus location.

Since May 27, the video started circulated online through chat groups on Chinese messenger app WeChat before it went viral on Weibo.

Yunnan Police stated on social media that the boys’ guardians have since apologized to the girl, who has now received medical care. The incident is still under investigation.

Thousands of Weibo commenters have responded to the incident with anger and disbelief. “What’s wrong with these boys?! How could they beat a young girl with so many of them?!”, a typical comment said.

Many Chinese netizens place the video in a larger framework, expressing outrage over the continuing problem of “campus violence” (校园暴力) in China.

“Stand up against campus violence!”, many say: “When will this finally stop?”

 

An epidemic of school violence

 

China has been dealing with an epidemic of school violence for years, with so-called ‘campus violence videos’ (校园暴力视频) being a concerning trend on Chinese social media.

Several factors may explain the emergence of extreme bullying or ‘campus violence’ (校园暴力) in China over the past years, including peer pressure, broken families, feelings of insecurity and increased time spent online.

In 2016, Chinese netizens already urged authorities to address the problem of bullying in schools. In previous years, the prevention and punishment of this kind of violence have increasingly become a topic of focus for the Chinese government and state media.

Netizens are mainly outraged over the continuing trend of campus violence and the extreme bullying videos for both legal and cultural reasons.

Legally, perpetrators often barely face legal consequences for their actions. Although schools will generally punish perpetrators and make them apologize, minors under the age of 16 rarely face criminal punishment for their actions.

Culturally, school bullying is often not seen as a serious one, with parents downplaying violent incidents as ‘small fights’ between kids.

With the Yunnan incident being yet another among so many over the past years, many netizens are calling for urgent action and warn that young people who display such violent behavior now, will continue to do so as adults.

“When can campus violence finally end,” one Weibo commenter (@草莓配糖) writes: “They are just using their status as minors as a protective umbrella.”

It is not yet known if the boys involved in this incident will face legal punishments. It would not be the first time for underage perpetrators in campus violence incidents to be sentenced.

In 2017, a Beijing court sentenced a group of ‘school bullies’ to prison for assaulting classmates and posting a video of their abuse online. In November of 2016, three female students were also sentenced six to eight months in prison for assaulting classmates and uploading a video of it on the internet.

Read more on school bullying and campus violence in China here:

 

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Health & Science

Schools in China Are Reopening, But Will Lunch Breaks Ever Be the Same Again?

Chinese students are back to school, but school life is not back to normal.

Manya Koetse

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As most schools across China are opening their doors again, social media users are sharing photos of what school life looks like in the post-COVID-19 outbreak era this week.

Some videos and images that are circulating on Weibo and Wechat show somewhat dystopian images of the post-COVID-19 school life at primary and (senior) high schools – students eating while standing outside in straight lines, or pupils wearing face masks taking turns to eat their lunch (supposedly to reduce the chances of contagion via respiratory droplets, see tweeted video below).

Most schools in China have already started or will open later this month. Only Hubei province and Beijing have not yet announced school reopening plans, Caixin reports.

But although China is gradually back to business after its weeks-long coronavirus lockdown, daily life is far from normal as the country remains on high alert for a possible second wave of COVID-19 infections.

Schools are therefore also taking strict precautions to reduce infection risks both in and outside of the classroom.

Lunch break policy and procedures are just one of the many things that have changed at Chinese schools now.

On Weibo, ‘Henan Education’ is one of many accounts posting about the dramatically different way of eating at China’s school canteens in these post-COVID-19-outbreak times.

In Xingyang city, for example, special supervisors have been allocated to high schools to maintain the order and reduce the number of students gathering at the school entrances and assist students with lunch break seatings at the canteen.

Canteen at Xingyang’s Second Senior High School

At a senior high school in Kaifeng, all students have their lunch breaks in the canteen at one side of the table only, leaving enough space in between the other students.

Other schools have set up their canteens like examination rooms, only allowing one student per table, only facing one direction.

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One Weibo user posts how her Tianjin school is preparing for the lunch break arrangements, with indicators on the floor marking the direction students should walk in and the distance they have to keep from each other.

One other school in Jiangsu’s Huai’an has put dividers on all lunch tables to separate students while having their lunch break.

“It feels like taking exams,” some commenters write about the new lunch break policies. “We can no longer look around and whisper in each other’s ear.”

One school board in the city of Beihai has decided to make use of its new separating screens to stimulate more studying during lunch breaks; they have printed study material for the upcoming ‘gaokao‘ exams on the dividers.

Some netizens think that other schools will follow this example if it appears to be effective. In that way, the post-COVID-19 lunch break will turn into just another study opportunity.

For more COVID-19 related articles, please click here.

By Manya Koetse (@manyapan)
With contributions from Miranda Barnes
Follow @whatsonweibo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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