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China Memes & Viral

Users of WeChat Moments Can Now Delete Comments from Friends

WeChat Moments has a new function, but users would rather see other things change.

Manya Koetse

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The latest iOS update of WeChat (7.0.15) brings a change to the Chinese app, allowing users to delete comments made by friends on their Moments posts.

Once a comment has been deleted, the person posting the comment will be able to see that their comment has been removed by their friend.

The update went trending on Chinese social media, with the hashthag “Comments Can Be Deleted in WeChat Moments” (#微信朋友圈可以删评论了#) receiving over 460 million views on Weibo by Monday night. By Tuesday, the topic hashtag page had received more than 970 million views.

Moments (朋友圈) is a function within the WeChat app that allows users to share pictures, links, or updates with captions. The Moments timeline is a feed that is somewhat similar to the Facebook timeline, where friends can comment on posts.

WeChat has 1.2 billion users worldwide. The majority of its userbase is in China. Whenever the app is changed or has functions added, it often becomes big news since the app plays such an important role in the online lives of Chinese users.

Although many people are happy with the new function in Wechat Moments, there are also many who would rather see other functions added to the app.

These are some of the most popular suggestions on what people would like to see changed within WeChat:

– enable users to edit one’s posts after posting
– allowing users to post longer videos
– introducing a real-time search function within Moments
– once a friend deletes you, that friend should also be deleted from your friend list
– adding a control toolbar to voice messages (to pause or adjust speed)
– no notifications when other people like posts of other friends
– clear chats out of the Wechat window without erasing the chat history
– add a ‘dislike’ button

Many Weibo commenters think the function to delete friends’ comments is a trivial change. They argue that if people do not have a friend connection on Wechat, they can’t see each other’s comments anyway. If you are friends and you’re deleting each other’s comments, you might as well not be friends.

There are also discussions that WeChat takes too long to implement new functions that are basic functions of social media. Being unable to edit or update your own post, which is possible on many sites including Instagram and Facebook, is one thing that many users are annoyed about.

Some are happy about the newly added feature, saying, for example, that they can finally delete comments on their photos of friends asking if they gained weight. “You have the right to comment on my posts, I have the right to remove your comments.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Media

Girl Brings 23 Relatives on Blind Date, Dinner Bill Comes Down to 20,000 Yuan

The girl said she wanted to test out the generosity of her date.

Manya Koetse

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Image via Qilu Evening News

An expensive blind date has become top trending on Chinese social media platform Weibo, after a girl allegedly brought 23 of her relatives and friends to the dinner. The restaurant bill was 20,000 yuan – close to 3000 USD.

According to China Newsweek Magazine (中国新闻周刊), a man by the name of Xiao Liu had asked the young woman out for dinner, saying it would be his treat. The girl then unexpectedly showed up with an entire crew, saying it was to “test out” Liu’s generosity.

Xiao Liu is a 29-year-old man from Zhejiang province. Struggling to find the time to date with his busy work schedule, Liu’s mother hired a matchmaker to find a suitable potential girlfriend for her single son. The incident happened during a date that was set up by this matchmaker.

The story was originally published by local media outlets Taizhou Evening News (台州晚报) and Qilu Evening News (齐鲁晚报) on WeChat. These sources report that Liu took off without paying once he saw the restaurant bill, quickly turning off his cellphone afterward.

Since Liu left the ‘dinner date’ without paying, the woman was stuck with the bill.

In an attempt to solve the situation with Liu later on, the young woman said she was “willing to go Dutch” on the bill. Liu refused but was still willing to pay the 4398 yuan bill (660 USD) for two tables, leaving the girl with the rest of the 15,402 yuan bill (2305 USD).

The girl reportedly turned to her relatives for help in paying the bill. Screenshots of the WeChat group chat were apparently leaked online, with some group members showing unwillingness to share in the high bill, saying that they did not smoke nor drink and just had a bite to eat – and that it was her who invited them in the first place.

On Weibo, the topic attracted 260 million views on Tuesday, with most commenters siding with Liu and condemning the girl.

Despite the online interest in the topic, there are also some netizens doubting whether or not the story is real. Although screenshots were shared by online media, the actual source of the story remains unknown. It is also not disclosed where or when the incident took place.

The fact that the story was also shared by some official (local) media makes people think that perhaps it was just posted as clickbait.

“Even an idiot would never bring 23 people to a date,” some commenters say.

It is not uncommon for these kinds of interpersonal incidents to go viral on Chinese media.

In 2016, one Shanghai girl was so disappointed about what her boyfriend’s parents served her for Chinese New Year, that she ended her relationship because of it. The story went mega-viral, reinforcing the ‘demanding leftover woman’ media cliché.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Memes & Viral

Separated by Fence, These Chinese Students Still Manage to Have Hotpot Together

Social life and entertainment in times of closed-off campuses.

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Over the past two weeks, universities across China have welcomed back their students, but campus life is not back to how it was in pre-COVID19 times.

Many universities have implemented strict anti-virus measures, with some promoting ‘closed-off management’ (封校管理), making it difficult for students to leave campus to go out.

This week, the popular Wechat account “Newsbro” (新闻哥) reported how a student in Baoding, Hebei province, made the best of his fenced-off campus situation by meeting his girlfriend for hotpot through the fence.

A video of the get-together was shared on social media by Fengmian News.

On Weibo, some commenters suggested the scene was “like a prison”, while others thought it looked like a “pet owner feeding its pet.”

Although some think the hotpot scene is staged, ‘Newsbro’ reports that there are multiple examples of “love in times of closed-off schools” (“封校时期的爱情”), with the account sharing a photo of another scene where lovebirds hug each other through the school fence.

Newsbro (新闻哥) also shares some gifs of people entertaining themselves at the dorms (see Twitter thread below).

In the article on dorm life in times of COVID19, Newsbro also shows that some people find creative ways to still get a haircut (image below).

Weibo Video also shared a post that showed that parents and new students still keep in touch through the fence. Parents bring their children food, and some families still manage to share dinners through the fence.

It is common for parents to see off their college freshman children at the start of a new semester. The so-called ‘tents of love’ custom, where parents actually stay on campus to help their children settle into their new life at university, is impossible due to COVID19 measures.

Recent photos and videos on Weibo and Wechat show that, despite the ‘new normal’ of Chinese campus life, people still find plenty of creative ways to keep their social life and late-night entertainment going.

Also read: The “Tents of Love” Phenomenon: Chinese Parents Sleep in Tents At Their Kids’ New University

Read more about COVID19 in China here.

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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