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Weibo’s New Online Guidelines: No Homosexual Content Allowed

The official Weibo Community Manager announced a 3-month-ban on online content on April 13, including that on displays of homosexuality.

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On April 13, Weibo’s Community Manager issued a notice with new guidelines for the social media platform to “create a bright and harmonious community environment.”

In the notice, that received near to 20,000 comments and over 96,000 shares shortly after it was posted (see screenshot), the official Sina Weibo account writes that, in order to “fulfill the corporate responsibility,” the platform will adhere to Internet Security Laws in strictly overseeing cartoons, games, videos, and other related content published on Weibo for a 3-month-period.

The Weibo Community Notice says its “clean-up” mainly targets content related to cartoons, images, and short videos relating to pornography, “bloody violence”, and homosexuality.

Violent content, such as that of the Grand Theft Auto game, will also not be allowed to appear on the social media platform.

According to the account, a total of 56,243 related violations were already “cleared” at the time they published the notice.

Although the announcement received many comments, they were not viewable at time of writing.

On their own accounts, many netizens also shared their views on the announcement: “According to China’s classification of mental disorders, being gay is not a mental illness,” one person writes: “Heterosexuals and homosexuals enjoy the same basic human rights. Publishing homosexual content is not illegal, and it should not be banned. It is my right to publish this post, and it would be wrong to delete it.”

“I object to Weibo’s guidelines against homosexual content. This is 2018, why do you still want to control everything people say?”

The slogan “I am Gay” (#我是同性恋#) also took off shortly after the announcement, with hundreds of netizens raising their voice against the guidelines by using this hashtag, some combining it with the hashtag “I am illegal” (Or: “I am breaking the law”) (#我违法#).

“If we don’t raise our voices now, then when will we?”, some said. “I am homosexual, and I am not proud of it, neither do I feel inferior,” one person stated.

This is not the first time the regulations for online content regarding the display of sexuality on Weibo are sharpened. In 2017, Chinese authorities also issued a statement in which they wrote that online audio-visual content on sites such as Sina Weibo would no longer be allowed to have any “display of homosexuality.” At the time, the Communist Youth League responded to the guidelines by posting: “Being gay is no disorder!”

Another commenter says: “I am an adult, and I should be able to view books, cartoons, or videos targeted at an adult audience. You’re now telling me I can’t view content relating to sexuality?”

“I am equal,” one Weibo user writes: “Why can’t we just respect each other?”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.


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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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27 Comments

27 Comments

  1. gab

    April 14, 2018 at 9:56 am

    Is it too hard for you to add a link to the official weibo post?
    All the article is based on it, screenshots sucks.

    • admin

      April 14, 2018 at 2:54 pm

      Hi lazy Sherlock, thanks for your kind comment. Because the comment section is disabled in the Weibo Community Manager post, it is not possible to provide a single URL to their post, hence the screenshot. Here’s their account where you can find the post: https://www.weibo.com/u/1934183965?refer_flag=1005055014_. Cheers.

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  25. winona

    May 13, 2018 at 10:28 pm

    2018 and people STILL living like this. outrageous. despicable.
    bravo to those people fighting back for their internet rights. one day we will undo the stigma of divergent sexuality.

    • Sotka Pujo

      July 3, 2018 at 7:28 pm

      There will always be stigma because you stink.

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China Digital

Chinese iPhone Users Flooded with Spam through iMessage

Since Apple handed over their iCould operations in China to the Chinese Guizhou-Cloud Big Data company, iPhone users are bombarded with trash ads in iMessage.

Ryan Gandolfo

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Intrusive advertisements, ranging from gambling promotions to non-solicited pornography, are flooding Chinese iPhones. Many users have had enough of them, and are looking for solutions.

The problem of spam ads is a universal one, but for iPhone users in China, they are especially bombarded with spam through iMessage.

Recently, several Chinese media outlets, including CCTV, have published articles and videos about Apple’s iMessage ‘trash’ messages flooding into Chinese iPhone users’ inbox. These messages contain various kinds of advertising, most of which are illicit.

A common junk ad in iMessage. The sender’s address is an email address with a combination of random numbers and letters. Source: CCTV news

The spam problem has also been a topic of debate on social media this week, where thousands of commenters complain about receiving loads of different ‘trash’ messages, primarily about gambling, purchasing agents, and sexual solicitation.

Even though iPhone users report and delete the messages, new ones keep on flooding in – and there seemingly is no solution for the issue yet.

Chinese media report that there is a rise in companies focusing on spam advertising. They build on massive iMessage user databases to send out ads to specific user groups based on their demographics, gender, age, sex, etc.

Cartoon comparing junk iMessage ads to mosquitos. Source: CCTV news.

The problem of Apple’s illicit spam adds to US-China tensions because of the trade war, with state media accusing Apple for failing to solve the problem.

While Chinese media outlets seem to be pointing fingers at Apple, many Weibo users are blaming the new company responsible for Apple’s iCloud services in mainland China, namely Guizhou-Cloud Big Data (云上贵州公司).

In February of this year, Apple handed over their iCould operations in China to a Chinese company to comply with government policies that require Chinese citizens’ data to be held within the country.

One user comments: “We didn’t have this [problem] before. Only after Guizhou-Cloud took over did it occur. Classic China.”

Another Weibo user wrote: “Wake up everyone! State enterprise Guizhou-Cloud is responsible for iCloud, and is selling user data on the black market. Why would you now blame Apple for this problem???”

For the many iPhone users searching for a quick fix to the annoying spam problem, Weibo account Digital Tail (@数字尾巴) offers a simple solution: “If you only use your message center to receive phone verifications and notifications, then you might as well just turn iMessage off.”

On August 2nd, Cult of Mac reported that Apple is now working with Chinese telecoms firms to find a way to reduce the flood of spam in iMessage.

Some Weibo commenters, however, think there are more important things to deal with first: “Solve the spam ads on Weibo, first,” they write: “They’re more intrusive anyway than those on iPhone.”

By Ryan Gandolfo

This article has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Digital

Chinese Online News Outlet Q Daily Shut Down

The shutdown of ‘Curious Daily’ aka Q Daily is making people more curious..

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The sudden suspension of news site Q Daily has attracted the attention of Chinese netizens.

As of Friday, August 3rd, the Chinese news outlet Q Daily (好奇心日报) has been shut down. Since the afternoon (Beijing time), visits to www.qdaily.com were redirected to a statement, saying:

“Facing our problems and earnest rectifications –

Q Daily has violated the news information regulations and has damaged the order of online information dissemination. In doing so, we violated the China Internet Security Law, the Administrative Measures for Internet Information Service, the Provisions for the Administration of Internet News Information Services, and other related stipulations. We will strictly implement the requirements of the regulatory authorities. From 15:00 pm on August 3 to 15:00 pm on September 2, we will [therefore] suspend all updates of the Q Daily platform and carry out comprehensive and thorough rectification.”

Shortly after the sudden shutdown, Chinese state media outlet SHINE, previously Shanghai Daily, reported that Q Daily had been shutdown for “illegally reporting and forwarding news,” “without obtaining the required qualifications to run an Internet news service.”

Other Chinese state media outlets, including China.org, also confirmed that the reason for the site’s suspension related to “long-term unauthorized engagement in Internet news information services.”

Q Daily, literally “Curious Daily,” is a privately-held online media site that has been running since April of 2014.

According to the Q Daily profile, the “light and web-native” news site is managed by Executive Editor Xianfeng Yi (伊险峰), who also founded the popular Chinese business magazine CBNweekly magazine.

At time of writing, the Weibo account of Q Daily @好奇心日报 is still online. Its latest released news articles, as posted on its account, mostly relate to foreign business news topics, such as the recent Heineken deal in China or the Starbucks opening in Italy.

The site’s shutdown received quite some attention on Chinese social media today – some threads receiving hundreds of shares and comments. “Socialism with Chinese characteristics is just putting news in a cage,” some commented: “All the news sources I like are being shut down.”

Many wondered about the exact reasons behind the suspension, jokingly saying: “It makes me even more curious..[to know why Curious Daily was suspended].” Others said: “We’re just not supposed to be curious.”

By Manya Koetse, with contribution from Diandian Guo.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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