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New Rules for Online Videos in China: “No Displays of Homosexuality”

Recently Chinese authorities have sharpened the regulations for online audio-visual content on sites such as Sina Weibo. In a statement issued by Chinese state media on June 30, regulators lay out new rules for online videos – audio-visual content that shows any “display of homosexuality” will no longer be allowed.

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In a statement issued by Chinese state media on June 30, Chinese regulators have laid out new rules for online videos. The regulations say that audio-visual content that shows any “display of homosexuality” will no longer be allowed and will be removed from China’s video platforms. Recently, Chinese authorities have sharpened the regulations for online audio-visual content on sites such as Sina Weibo, where live-streaming was banned last week.

The China Netcasting Services Association (CNSA, 中国网络视听节目服务协会) has issued new rules that will further strengthen the regulations of online audio-visual content on Chinese platforms. The rules were released on the official CNSA website on June 30, and disseminated by official media outlets such as China News, Xinhua, Global Times, and others.

Chinese news outlet The Paper reported that one of the new regulations concerns the removal of online content that “displays homosexuality” (“展示同性恋等内容“).

Recently, Chinese authorities have sharpened online regulations. One June 22, regulators halted live streaming on various platforms including Sina Weibo, iFeng and ACFUN. The State Administration for Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Televsion (SAPPRFT) issued a statement saying the ban came into effect because these sites were “not complying” with existing online regulations and for “promoting negative comments” (“宣扬负面言论的社会评论性节目”).

Weibo responded to the ban with new rules for posting online audiovisual content. According to Technode, users who do not hold a “proper license” may no longer upload audiovisual content, and users who stream movies, TV shows and similar programs will need to hold a permit for public broadcast.

The latest rules issued by Chinese regulators on June 30 concern online audiovisual programs such as online dramas, short clips, online films, cartoons, documentaries, and others.

The rules say that all online content “should adhere to the correct political direction, and strive to disseminate contemporary Chinese values” (“互联网视听节目服务相关单位应坚持正确的政治方向,努力传播体现当代中国价值观念”).

Any ‘programmes’ that are not in line with the regulations will reportedly be deleted. This includes any videos that “are harmful to the country’s image” or, in any way, “endanger national unity and social stability.”

The regulation specifies that “luxurious lifestyles” should not be promoted, and that any detailed manifestations of violence cannot be depicted.

About sexuality, the rules state that online audio-visual content should not “display abnormal sexual behavior, such as incest, homosexuality, sexual perversions, sexual assault, and other sexual violence.” It also specifies that “unhealthy love and marriage situations”, including extramarital affairs or one-night stands, or promiscuity should not be promoted.

The new rules put homosexuality together with incest and sexual perversion as ‘abnormal sexual behaviour’.

On Sina Weibo, netizens respond to the new rules, saying: “Why is homosexuality considered ‘abnormal’?” and “Is this a joke? Are you turning homosexuality into a disease again?”

“I don’t support the politically correct stupid LGBT supporters,” one person says: “But isn’t it a bit feudal to call homosexuality ‘abnormal sexual behaviour’?”

The LGBT Weibo account “Gay Voice” (@同志之声 “Comrade’s Voice”) responded to the latest regulations with the following statement through their official Weibo page:

“This afternoon, the China Netcasting Services Association convened in Beijing with the members of council to consider and adopt the “General Rules for Examining Audiovisual Programs” (网络视听节目内容审核通则), and publish them. In these general regulations, “homosexuality” is described as “abnormal sexual relations and behavior.” This has caused great uproar amongst people in the entertainment industry and among LGBT supporters. Since April 2001, China has already removed homosexuality from the “Standard for Classifying Mental Disorders.” In China, homosexuality is now regarded as a normal sexual orientation, and homosexual relationships and sexual behaviors are just as normal as heterosexual relationships and sexual behaviors, and should not be treated differently. The false information in these regulations has already caused harm to Chinese homosexuals – who are already subjected to prejudice and discrimination. We, as the Gay Voice, along with other LGBT organizations, hereby want to correct the error in these regulations, and hope that the relevant authorities will correct it. We have the legal right to defend ourselves.”

By Manya Koetse
Diandian Guo

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©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, Sino-Japanese relations and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. zinboga

    July 1, 2017 at 9:56 am

    Fuck you Christian Inc. You own this.

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China Media

Jiang Ge Tokyo Murder Case: Chen Shifeng Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison

More than a year after the fatal stabbing, the main suspect in the much talked about Jiang Ge case has been sentenced to 20 years in prison by a Tokyo judge.

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The main suspect in one of China’s most talked-about crime cases of 2017 has been found guilty of murdering Chinese student Jiang Ge, and was sentenced to 20 years in prison in Tokyo on Wednesday. It was not the death penalty that the victim’s mother had hoped for.

The Chinese exchange student Chen Shifeng, who was the main suspect in the controversial Jiang Ge murder case, was sentenced to 20 years in prison by a Tokyo judge on Wednesday.

Chen was found guilty of intentionally killing Jiang Ge, who was also a student in Japan. Chinese media report that Chen fainted when the judge ruled the verdict.

Chen was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

The Tokyo murder has become a frequent trending topic on Chinese social media over the past year, as the victim’s mother turned to netizens for help earlier this year.

A ‘Public Drama’

In November 2016, the 24-year-old Chinese student Jiang Ge (江歌) was fatally stabbed outside her apartment in Tokyo by Chen Shifeng (陈世峰), the ex-boyfriend of her roommate and close friend Liu Xin (刘鑫), who was also studying in Japan.

According to media reports, an altercation had occurred earlier that day between Chen and the two young women. When Liu and Jiang arrived back to their apartment later that night, Liu entered the apartment first while Jiang, still outside the apartment, was attacked by Chen with a knife.

Jiang Ge and the apartment hallway where she was fatally stabbed.

The case became a ‘public drama’ for the role of Liu, who said she had heard her friend’s cries in the hallway but could not open the door because it “was blocked.” She called the police, but when they arrived at the scene it was already too late.

Victim’s mother Jiang Qiulian (@江秋莲) later blamed Liu for purposely not helping her friend, never contacting the family after her daughter’s murder, and for not even sending her condolences.

Jiang Qiulian spent weeks collecting signatures on the streets of Tokyo for an online petition that called for the death penalty for Chen, and received much support from Chinese netizens.

The Verdict

On Wednesday, the long-awaited verdict finally came out. Chen Shifeng was not given the death penalty, but was sentenced to 20 years in prison for murdering Jiang Ge.

The knife used in the stabbing played an important role in the trial. Chen claimed that it was not his intention to stab Jiang, but that the knife was given to Jiang by Liu through the door for her own protection.

But police researchers pointed out that the same kind of knife used in the stabbing was missing from the school lab where Chen studied, which was bought by his professor. The judge eventually ruled that there was enough evidence that the knife was Chen’s.

On Weibo, many people are discussing the outcome of the trial, saying that 20 years in prison is not enough for taking someone’s life. “He’ll only be 40-something when he gets out – it’s not enough,” some say.

But there are also people who praise the Japanese juridical system, and say that the ruling is fair. “I support them for getting out the facts and exposing Chen Shifeng as a liar and a murderer.”

– By Manya Koetse

With contributions from Miranda Barnes.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Media

These 36 Chinese Naval Officers Have Tied the Knot in a Group Wedding

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The collective warship wedding of 36 naval officers of the East China Sea Fleet has drawn the attention of Chinese netizens. Besides a romantic event, the wedding spectacle is also a propaganda opportunity to stress the importance of the Chinese Dream and building a powerful military.

Recently, 36 commanders of the East China Sea Fleet who had been postponing their marriages due to military tasks held a collective wedding on a warship in Zhoushang, Zhejiang.

The Chinese official military news outlet military.cnr.cn reported the remarkable wedding event earlier this month.

Besides a festive event, the collective wedding was also a media spectacle propagating the importance of China’s national defense in accordance with the speech delivered by President Xi Jinping during the 19th National Party Congress.

In this 3,5 hours speech, one segment focused specifically on the Chinese Dream and building a powerful military:

Comrades,

Our military is the people’s military, and our national defense is the responsibility of every one of us. We must raise public awareness about the importance of national defense and strengthen unity between the government and the military and between the people and the military. Let us work together to create a mighty force for realizing the Chinese Dream and the dream of building a powerful military.”

On Weibo, many commenters praise the collective wedding. “Why doesn’t my work unit organize such a group wedding?” one person wants to know.

“I also want to marry a naval officer!,” multiple netizens write.

– By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

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