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Welcome to a Fresh-Looking What’s on Weibo

Manya Koetse

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What’s on Weibo is undergoing a complete make-over to make the site more user-friendly, responsive and organized for you. The new site will include this blog page, Weiblog, where we will keep you updated with daily snippets of Weibo news and trending topics.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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Express VPN Deal This Black Friday / Cyber Monday (China 2019)

Black Friday Alert! Express VPN deal.

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We’ve previously recommended this VPN on What’s on Weibo, today we show their best deal for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

Black Friday is almost here! Black Friday 2019 falls on November 29, with Cyber Monday following on December 2nd. Like with Singles’ Day in China, deals often start well before Black Friday and last some days after Cyber Monday, so here we are now.

We’re here to list the best deal for our favorite VPN that still works behind the Great Firewall.

First: experiences may differ for everyone, depending on their wifi/4G connections and the devices they use. In order for a VPN to work in China, make sure you have a stable internet connection and always make sure you have the latest version of the VPN app you use.

At What’s on Weibo, we have recently had good experiences with both ExpressVPN and KeepSolid VPN Unlimited. When one of them didn’t work, the other one did, making it a good pair to purchase.

We previously also had other VPNs on our recommended list, but no longer recommend them because of persisting connection problems in China.

Please take into consideration that over the past months, both of the abovementioned VPNs have also had their share of problems in the PRC every now and then – it happens to the best of them. To be sure to always stay connected, you could consider purchasing multiple VPNs.

KeepSolid currently does not have a Black Friday deal, but if you are looking for another VPN to use- not necessarily for China, but in general, – you can also check out the Black Friday offer by NordVPN; they now offer major discount on their 3-year plan ($3.49 per month + 3 months FREE, $125.64 total = 70% discount); their 2-year plan: $4.99 per month, $119.76 total = 58% discount); and their 1-year plan: $6.99 per month, $83.88 total = 41% discount). Click here for that deal.

 

Express VPN Black Friday Deal

This 2019 Black Friday, it is Express VPN that has the best deal on offer, so we will only feature that one here; three months free when you purchase the 12-month plan – which is the 15 month deal for only $6.67 per month (Express VPN usually starts at $12.95 per month).

ExpressVPN, which actually calls itself the “#1 Trusted leader in VPN”, is a reliable service with mostly steady connections depending on what location you select. The app has the ‘smart location’ button that helps you pick the best location to connect to from where you are.

They have excellent service and frequent updates for desktop, mobile, and tablet. Make sure you always update your app, Express will then recommend the best location to connect from, which is super convenient (for now, for example, it’s Hong Kong 4, Tokyo 3, and LA 5 that work best).

Express VPN usually offers single month services starting from $12.95/month, and 6-month plans from $9.99/month; with their Black Friday Deal you get three months free with a 12-month ExpressVPN plan to save 49% compared to their usual monthly price. That’s 15 months for the price of 12, with a total price of  $99.95 now.

The “30 Days Risk-Free” promise of ExpressVPN makes the barrier to try it out much lower. If you are not satisfied, they’ll get you your money back without questions asked.

 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE BLACK FRIDAY DEAL (UNTIL DECEMBER)

 

NB: This post is not a sponsored post. We only recommend VPNs that we’ve tested and know. These recommendations may, however, include an affiliate link that at absolutely no additional cost whatsoever to you allows What’s on Weibo to receive a small percentage in case you purchase the service. (Which also helps a bit to keep our site going, so it’s win-win!). Do you think we should recommend another VPN and want to share your experiences? We’re open to try it out and add to this list – feel free to contact us.

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Health & Science

40-Year-Old Woman Completes Shanghai Marathon While 8 Months Pregnant

Pregnant marathon runner Lili clashes with Chinese traditional attitudes towards women who are expecting a baby.

Jessica Colwell

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A 40-year-old woman named Li Lili (黎莉莉) became news in China after she ran the Shanghai Marathon last Sunday while 32 weeks pregnant, completing the race in five hours and 17 minutes.

This was the third marathon Li has run during her pregnancy. She ran the first two during week eight (with a time of 3:54:43) and week 22 (with a time of 4:47:58) of her pregnancy.

Lily is an avid runner, having completed 62 marathons during her lifetime. Her story went viral on Weibo under the hashtag “8 Months Pregnant 40-Year-Old Woman Runs Marathon” (#40岁孕妇怀胎8月跑完全马#), which has received over 200 million reads at time of writing.

[Li has run three marathons during her pregnancy, one in each trimester.]

Her story has ignited debate across Weibo this week regarding the merits and dangers of vigorous exercise during pregnancy. In interviews with the press, however, Li remained defiant in the face of her critics.

“For many people, they are worried about this because they don’t understand it,” she told video news site Pear Video in an interview.

“Many people have told me it is dangerous. They criticize me, just like they criticized Chen Yihan,” she says, referring to Taiwanese actress Ivy Chen (陈意涵) who faced fierce online criticism after posting pictures of herself running while five months pregnant in 2018.

Actress Ivy Chen’s controversial Weibo post from 2018, showing her running 5 kilometers while five months pregnant.

“But most of these critics have never even been pregnant,” Li continued: “The fact is, I did this because I have a very deep understanding of my own body. I’ve run over 60 marathons, I am an extremely good runner. I’ve run a marathon in 3:28, which is considered an excellent time even for talented athletes, even for men. I have my own training methods, I’ve been training for a very long time, and have carefully prepared for these marathons.”

The reactions to Li’s story online have ranged from enthusiastic praise to outright condemnation.

“Wow! I admire how strong she is! It is said that each person knows what is right for them in their own heart. It’s none of your business what she does with this unborn hero!” gushes the most popular comment on Pear Video’s Weibo post about the story.

But another popular comment argues that marathon running is actually inappropriate for Chinese women in general: “Foreigners running marathons is fine, but this is not for Chinese women. Pregnant Chinese women running marathons is equivalent to them not caring for their children.”

The results from a poll put out by Chengdu Economic Daily so far show the majority of readers do not oppose Li’s decision to run a marathon, with 54,000 choosing the option “One case cannot represent the whole, it will vary from individual to individual” and 38,000 choosing “Support, if the mother’s body is strong enough.” Only 17,000 chose the option “Oppose, pregnant women should not engage in vigorous exercise.”

“What do you think of a 40-year-old woman running a marathon while 8 months pregnant?” asks a Weibo poll by Chengdu Economic Daily.

Some comments on the poll argued that Li was irresponsible to take part in a marathon, in case something did go wrong: “Problems come up when you least expect them. If it’s just you running on your own, that’s one thing. But this is a group race. I can’t say if it’s right or wrong, but it could bring a lot of trouble to other people.”

But the majority of popular comments expressed outright support and admiration, or at the very least opposition to Li’s critics, telling them to mind their own business.

The support for Li’s decision appears to fly in the face of Chinese traditional attitudes towards pregnant women. The list of dos and don’ts for Chinese mothers-to-be is long and complex, ranging from the bizarre (no eating/drinking dark foods so as not to affect the baby’s skin color) to the more common (avoiding shellfish).

The belief that pregnant mothers should avoid exertion is high on the list, extending even to the month after birth.

But despite these strong traditions, Li’s strength and determination have clearly inspired new support for expectant mothers who wish to continue an active lifestyle while pregnant.

Also read: ‘Sitting the Month’ – a Gift or Torture?

Also read: Bad Mom To Be? Pregnant Woman Intentionally Trips 4-Year-Old Boy in Baoji

By Jessica Colwell
Follow @whatsonweibo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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