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Woman Fakes Kidnapping to Test Husband’s Love

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A 43-year-old woman from Chongqing recently faked her own kidnapping, leading to a team of 29 policemen searching for her for 2 days and 2 nights. When they found her unharmed, she said she staged her own abduction to “test if her husband still loved her”.

When a 43-year-old Chongqing housewife named ‘Huang’ suddenly disappeared on June 22nd, her family was worried sick as repeated phone calls to her smartphone were left unanswered – except for one.

During the evening of June 23rd, when Huang’s phone was suddenly answered, her husband heard a muzzled sound and could make out the voice of his wife saying: “Please don’t kidnap me. I know you are from Changshou [district of Chongqing]!”, before the connection was cut off.

The woman’s family immediately called emergency number 110, after which the local police station sent out a team of 10 officers to rescue her, Chongqing Evening News reported on June 30.

Potentional mine abduction

The local police station took immediate action after the emergency call. In the end, a rescue team was set up with a total of 29 officers working on the case. Various police officers scanned different areas in Chongqing and did house-to-house investigations while fully armed.

Through technological methods, the police traced that Huang had to be near a village in the vicinity of the Changshou suburban district, which corresponded to what Huang had mentioned on the phone about her abductor.

Investigators discovered that the Huang’s ex-brother-in-law also lived in the same area. When they called his house, the phone was repeatedly hung up. As this brother-in-law was known to work in a remote mining area, police suspected Huang might have been brought there and called reinforcement to go to the mines. After finding them empty, they went to her house where they finally discovered the true identity of the “abductor” – Huang herself.

“Fun” experience to “test” husband’s love

According to Chongqing Evening News, Huang’s former brother-in-law stated that Huang had been at his home all along and had done all she could to repeatedly hang up incoming phone calls. When he demanded an explanation, she had left his home on the night of June 23.

Police finally tracked down Huang on the streets of the village, where she acted as if “nothing had happened”. Investigators later found out that Huang had fully staged her own kidnapping, for which she was sentenced to a 10-day detainment for “fabricating this affair”.

Huang later stated that, although she was happy with her marriage of ten years to her second husband and their family of two daughters, she just thought it “would be fun” to experience this “kidnapping”, and that she wanted to “test” how much her husband loved her.

Classical case of “urban empty individual”

According to psychological expert Gang Tanqiang quoted by the Chongqing Evening News, Huang represents the “classical urban empty person” (“典型的都市空心人”) who leads a “boring, monotonous and lonely” life and will go to extremes to put themselves at the center of attention.

Gang Tanqiang says: “If you experience feelings of emptiness as an urban citizen, be extra vigilant to avoid psychological problems. Talk about your feelings with relatives or close friends.” Gang also advises people to undertake outings to relieve boredom, and to join clubs for regular social interaction.

“Beyond any joke”

“This woman has a problem,” one Weibo user comments: “There’s always something, whether he loves her or not – she is too focused on what others think of her. And she has wasted the time of 29 police officers because of it. She should be detained.”

“These kind of police officers are hard to find, and yet she deceives them!” another commenter writes.

“Detaining her for 10 days is too light of a punishment…” one Weibo user writes. “To make false police reports, this goes beyond any joke,” another netizen says.

– By Manya Koetse

Featured image: police officer during one of the house-to-house searches for Mrs. Huang, picture by Chongqing Evening News.

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Local News

Chinese Twin Sisters Switched Identities to Illegally Travel Abroad over 30 Times

The lookalike sisters thought it was “convenient” to use each other’s passport to travel to Japan, Russia, Thailand and other countries.

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Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

On June 27, a local public security bureau in the city of Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, released a press statement regarding the peculiar case of twin sisters who used each other’s identity to travel abroad over thirty times.

The two Zhou sisters, *Hong and *Wei (pseudonyms), started switching identities when Hong’s husband, a Japanese national, returned to Japan. Hong wanted to join her husband in Japan, but her visa application was repeatedly denied due to not meeting the requirements.

Hong then decided to use her sister’s travel documents to travel to Japan to see her husband various times. She reportedly also used her sister’s passport to travel to Russia. She ended up traveling between China, Russia, and Japan at least thirty times.

Wei, who reportedly thought this way of switching identities was “convenient”, also used her sister’s passport to travel to Thailand and some other countries on four different occasions.

After authorities found out what the sisters had been up to earlier in 2022, they were advised in May to return back to China. While the case is still under investigation, the sisters are now being held for the criminal offense of border management obstruction.

The case went trending in the hot-search topic list on Weibo, where many people are wondering how this could have happened so many times. “If you exit and enter the country, aren’t fingerprints collected?”, some wondered, with others saying the border technological systems were apparently not good enough to detect such identity fraud.

There were also those who thought the story was quite “amazing” and sounded “like the plot of a television series.”

By Manya Koetse

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©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Insight

What Happened in Tangshan? The Violent Restaurant Incident Everyone Is Talking About

This outburst of violence against female customers at a restaurant in Tangshan has sent shockwaves across Chinese social media.

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Over the past two days, everybody on Chinese social media is talking about an incident that happened at a BBQ restaurant in Tangshan, a prefecture-level city in the northeast of Hebei province.

A surveillance video from the BBQ restaurant captured the incident that happened at 2:40 on June 10th. Security footage from inside the restaurant shows how three female customers are dining when a male customer walks by and touches the back of one of the women (dressed in white).

The incident starts when the man in the green jacket approaches the women and tries to touch the woman dressed in white.

The woman pushes his arm away and raises her voice at him. When he tries to grab her again, she slaps away his hand, after which the man hits the woman in the face.

The woman fights the man off, but he hits her and the situation escalates immediately.

Within a matter of seconds, the incident leads to an outburst of violence. When the woman stands up to fight back against the man, her friend (dressed in black) stands up and smashes a beer bottle on the man’s head. She is immediately pulled away by the man, who is now joined by two other male customers.

While the girl dressed in black is beaten, her friend (dressed in gray) is coming to help her. One of the men violently throws a chair towards them and she is also being kicked. Meanwhile, the woman in white gets beaten again by the man who first touched her.

The two women on the right are also being attacked while the man in green again assaults the woman dressed in white on the left.

Another man also joins in the violent attack and drags the woman out of the restaurant by her hair. A man dressed in red comes up and suddenly smashes a beer bottle on the woman’s head.

The rest of the security footage was captured outside the Tangshan restaurant, where the brutal attack on the woman continued. The man in the green jacket violently kicks her in the head and others join in.

When another woman dining at the restaurant tries to pull the men away from her, she is also beaten to the ground and hits her head on the steps. The girl in gray comes to help and is also beaten while doing so.

The woman is dragged out of the restaurant by her hair and is then kicked and attacked by three men. The woman on the left (in a white t-shirt) tries to pull the men away, but she is also beaten to the ground.

For just a brief moment, the situation seems to calm down as two of the women are lying on the ground after the violent attack, the men standing around.

While the two women lie motionless on the pavement, the men stand around.

Unfortunately, the scene continues to escalate within seconds as the women are trying to get back up. When the man in the green jacket grabs a bottle to hit the woman he initially assaulted, a man (red hat) intervenes. But the assault continues.

The woman is kicked in the head, beaten, and repeatedly dragged by her hair. She is attacked by at least three of the men. When a third woman tries to stop one of the men, she is beaten in the head by a man who seems to be her own partner (he stops and hugs her immediately after).

The scene is incredibly messy, with some five men standing around the woman and violently attacking her. The same man who just seemed to protect her (red hat) now also joins in and another beer bottle is smashed on her body or head. The other women helplessly stand around.

While the attack continues, one of the men convinces the others to leave (“Let’s go, let’s go!”). The men then leave the woman on the street and take off.

The woman is left on the street as the group of men takes off.

Later, photos showing the main victim of the brutal attack in a hospital bed soon surfaced on social media.

The outrageous level of violence displayed in the attack sent shockwaves across social media on Friday and Saturday. On Weibo, several hashtags on the Tangshan incident went trending, some hashtags attracting over a billion views.

The incident is triggering different discussions. Some relate to the apparent slow police response to the altercation and the time it took for the men to be arrested. Netizens commented that China’s surveillance system is seemingly faster to detect one case of Covid and track down a patient’s last whereabouts than it is to track down nine men involved in such a crime.

Other discussions relate to violence against women and how the media responds to it, as some Chinese media sources described how the first woman “rejecting” the man set off the altercation. Many people also felt the media reports were downplaying the incident.

People are angry about how Chinese media described the incident and how it started by the woman “rejecting” the man.

On Weibo, the Communist Youth League used a smiling emoji when posting about the incident, also sparking outrage online. Although the emoticon was later edited out and comments were censored, netizens reposted the emoji and wondered why the Communist Youth League wanted to be sarcastic or funny about such a display of violence.

Netizens are angry about the Communist Youth League using a smiley in a post relating to the Tangshan incident.

There are then also discussions zooming in on bystander responses to the attack, and about whether or not others should have stepped in.

These are similar discussions to when an assault on a woman happened in Beijing in 2016, without anyone stepping in (read here).

By Saturday afternoon (local time), all of the nine men involved in the incident were arrested. Some of them had already fled to Jiangsu province.

In response to photos of the arrest of one of the men, a meme came up on social media warning people to stay away from men dressed like him.

Meanwhile, the case is still trending on Chinese social media. Gender, misogyny, bystander effect, morality, gang violence, rule of law, public security, and media bias are all themes that come up in online discussions. There are also those who are happy about the fact that the entire incident was captured by surveillance cameras, because otherwise the severity of the incident might have never come out.

On Saturday, Global Times reported that two female victims had been sent to the hospital for treatment and are now in stable condition. Two other women suffered minor injuries and were not hospitalized.

There’s an update to this story HERE. Also see some of our other stories related to women and gender issues in China here.

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

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Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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