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These are the 20 ‘Uncivilized’ Chinese Tourists Who Are Banned from Traveling

China’s National Tourist Bureau recently issued new public travel regulations that restrict or blacklist Chinese tourists from traveling if they behave ‘uncivilized’. At present, these 20 Chinese tourists are already blacklisted.

Manya Koetse

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China’s National Tourist Bureau recently issued new public travel regulations that restrict or blacklist Chinese tourists from traveling if they behave ‘uncivilized’. At present, these 20 Chinese tourists are already blacklisted.

China’s National Tourist Office (国家旅游局) has recently issued its new travel regulations (旅行社条例) that state that when Chinese tourists behave ‘uncivilized’ whilst traveling, they will be restricted or banned from future travels.

The topic “20 tourists enter the blacklist” (#20名游客入黑名单#) became trending on Sina Weibo on August 20.

A popular Weibo blog by state broadcaster CCTV answered the questions many netizens wanted to know: who are these 20 blacklisted travelers, and what did they do?

What did those 20 blacklisted travelers do?

CCTV did not only provide details over the incidents that triggered these travelers’ blacklisting, they also provided their full names and cities of residence.

50% of all cases on the blacklist related to arguments over seating arrangements. 60% of banned passengers were blacklisted due to their behavior on an airplane or at the airport. Out of all the cases, 40% took place while traveling within mainland China. Out of the travelers, 9 are female and 11 are male. These are the 20 cases:

Number 1 & 2: Two Chinese passengers lashed out at the crew of an Air Asia flight en route from Bangkok to Nanjing in a dispute over their seating in late 2014. The angry passengers caused so much havoc on board, even scalding the stewardess with hot noodles, that the plane had to return to Bangkok to kick the passengers off the aircraft.

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The two passengers on the blacklist are a man from Jiangsu province named Mr. W. and a woman from Anhui named Mrs. Z.

Number 3: Beijing resident Z. (male) tried to open an emergency door on an airplane awaiting takeoff to Beijing at Yunnan’s Kunming airport in 2015. This was not the only case; there have been multiple cases of Chinese tourists opening up airplane emergency exits over the past few years.

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Number 4: Mr. L. from Shaanxi will no longer be able to travel after he climbed the statue of a Red Army soldier at Shaanxi province memorial park to take a picture in April 2015. The photograph later went viral on Chinse social media.

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Number 5 & 6: Two Chinese women will no longer be able to travel after causing so much chaos on an airplane from Dalian to Shenzhen, that the plane from Shenzhen Airlines had to make an emergency landing. The women allegedly were unsatisfied about their seating.

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Number 7: A young man from Sichuan decided to climb one of the main statues at the Qinghai scenic park to take a picture. He later uploaded the picture to social media, which, according to CCTV, “brought about a nasty influence on society”.

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Number 8, 9, 10, 11: Three women and one man from Sichuan and Chongqing are put on China’s traveling blacklist when refusing to board their plane and singing the national anthem at Bangkok airport, after their flight had a 10-hour-delay due to bad weather conditions. Together with other Chinese tourists, the four created major uproar at the airport.

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Number 12: One male traveler from Hunan joining a day tour to Qingcheng Mountain was so upset that he had to pay a children’s ticket for his child that was over 1.2 meters tall, that he got angry with local staff and injured a tour guide.

Number 13: Mr. R. from Shanghai is on the blacklist after getting into an argument with a convenience store employee in Sapporo, Japan. When he opened up a package of food in the store before paying, local staff informed him and his wife that it was not allowed to eat within the store. Mr. Rong allegedly attacked the man, who then suffered injuries in his face.

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Number 14, 15, 16: Two women and a man from Sichuan were banned from traveling after being thrown off an airplane in Cambodia for creating havoc over their seating.

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Number 17: Mr. Y. from Hubei insulted and abused the tour guide of a travel tour going to Taiwan when he was unsatisfied with the dinner seating arrangements.

Number 18: A Yunnan male traveler participated in a Taiwan travel group when he illegally took a total of 0.5 kilo living coral and violated local environmental laws in Taiwan’s Taidong County.

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Number 19 & 20: A man and woman from Heilongjiang threatened to kill their tour guide during an argument over their bus seating arrangements in the city of Sanya in China’s Hainan province. The incident was captured on video and went viral on Chinese social media.

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The blacklisted travelers will not be able to travel for a minimum period of three years, during which multiple organizations and institutions, such as customs, inspection & quarantine, and border control offices will be informed about their actions. These institutions will then be able to prevent these individuals from going abroad, boarding an airplane, or joining a tour group. Other places, such as national scenic parks, will also have the right to refuse these individuals entrance to their premises.

Many Weibo netizens applaud the blacklist, and think that it should be changed to a permanent travel ban for people showing extreme behavior while traveling. “We should’ve implemented this rule much earlier,” one netizen says: “These people really are an embarrassment.”

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Ttu

    August 24, 2016 at 8:12 am

    China is a magical place or is it

  2. Avatar

    Bill

    January 12, 2017 at 8:47 am

    China is a lovely historic country to visit. Take advantage of opportunities to see many places. The people are great!!

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China Insight

From Hong Kong Protests to ‘Bright Future’ – The Top 3 Most Popular Posts on Weibo This Week

These are the most-read posts on Weibo this week.

Manya Koetse

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The three most-read posts on Weibo over the past week – an overview by What’s on Weibo.

The protests in Hong Kong have been dominating Chinese social media throughout August, and the past week has been no different. Two out of three most-read posts on Weibo, one of China’s most popular social media platforms, were about Hong Kong this week.

A wrap-up:

 

#1 Hundreds of Hong Kong Taxi’s Flying Chinese National Flag

Image shared by CCTV on their Weibo account.

While Hong Kong is gearing up for the 13th consecutive weekend of mass anti-government demonstrations, there are no signs of the protests fizzling out any time soon.

The Hong Kong protests started in March and April of this year against an extradition bill that would allow local authorities to detain and extradite people wanted in mainland China, and have intensified over the past weeks.

Although authorities in mainland China initially remained quiet on the topic, the Hong Kong demonstrations have been dominating the trending streams on China’s popular social media platforms for all of August.

Through videos, online posters, and slogans, Chinese state media have propagated a clear narrative on the situation in Hong Kong; namely that a group of “separatists” or “bandits” are to blame for the riots that aim to “damage public security” in Hong Kong and are “dividing the nation.”

News outlets such as People’s Daily and CCTV are sharing many stories that emphasize the One China principle and praise the Hong Kong police force. Those voices in Hong Kong speaking up for the police force and condemning protesters using violence have been amplified in Chinese media.

One story that became the number one trending post on Weibo this week is that of dozens of Hong Kong taxi drivers hanging the Chinese national flag from their cars (video).

On August 23, the taxi drivers reportedly formed a rally against violence at Tsim Sha Tsui, waving the flags and putting up signs saying “I love HK, I love China.”

The hashtag “500 Hong Kong Taxi’s Hanging up Chinese National Flags” (#香港500辆的士挂上国旗#), hosted by CCTV, attracted over 700 million views on Weibo. The CCTV post reporting on the event received over half a million likes and 47000 shares.

The commenters mostly praise the Hong Kong taxi drivers for “standing up for Hong Kong” and flying the Chinese flag.

In English-language media, it has mostly been Chinese state media reporting on the rally. Xinhua, Women of China, ECNS, and Global Times all reported on the August 23 peace rally.

CNN only shortly reported how “a number of taxis have been spotted driving around the city displaying Chinese flags — something that has not happened on this scale during previous protests” (link).

 

#2 ‘Bright Future’ Title Song for Upcoming Movie ‘The Moon Remembers All’

Over 266.000 Weibo users have been sharing a post by Chinese actor Li Xian (李现) on the title track for the new Chinese movie The Moon Remembers All or River on a Spring Night (Chinese title: 春江花月夜).

The upcoming movie itself is a very popular topic on Weibo recently, attracting 430 million views on its hashtag page alone. The movie just finished shooting and will be released in 2020.

The song titled “Bright Future” (前程似锦) is sung by Taiwanese singer Chen Linong (陈立农) and Li Xian, who are both the leading actors in the fantasy movie. The song was released on August 29.

The Moon Remembers All is produced by Edko Films and directed by Song Haolin (宋灏霖), also known for Mr. Zhu’s Summer (2017) and Fatal Love (2016).

 

#3 Interview with Hong Kong Pro-Beijing LegCo Member Junius Ho

The third most popular Weibo post of this week comes from Xia Kedao (侠客岛), a popular commentator account for the People’s Daily Overseas Edition, and concerns a live broadcasted interview with Hong Kong lawmaker and Legislative Council (LegCo) member Junius Kwan-yiu Ho.

Junius Ho (何君尧) is known as being ‘pro-Beijing’ and stirred controversy earlier this summer when a viral video showed him shaking hands with men wearing white T-shirts who allegedly were linked to the mob attacking people at the Yuen Long MTR station on July 21.

Xia Kedao describes Junius Ho as a “straightforward” politician who “speaks out for justice” and denounces “reactionaries.”

In the August 28 interview, that was live-streamed on Sina Weibo and later also written up, the Hong Kong legislator discussed the background of the protests.

Ho argues that the people with “ulterior motives” used the extradition bill for their own power struggle, distorting and exaggerating the facts behind the regulation.

The politician also partly links the protests to a “weak national consciousness” in Hong Kong due to its education curriculum and says that there have not been enough legal consequences for those participating in illegal activities and riots.

Thousands of commenters on Weibo write that they appreciate Ho for speaking out against the “pro-independence riot youth” and praise him for his “deep understanding” of mainland China.

By now, Junius Ho, who is also active on Weibo with his own account, has gathered more than half a million fans on his page.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Media

CCTV Launches Dramatic Propaganda Video Condemning Hong Kong Protests, Praising HK Police Force

This CCTV video leaves no doubt about what narrative on the Hong Kong protests it’s trying to convey.

Manya Koetse

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This week, while the protests in Hong Kong were intensifying, Chinese state broadcaster CCTV published a video on its social media channels in support of the Hong Kong Police Force. The hashtag used with the video is “HK Police, We Support You!” (香港警察我们挺你#).

“Evil will not press [us] down! A Sir [HK Officers], 1.4 billion compatriots support you!” is the sentence used to promote the video.

The video was initially issued by Xiaoyang Video (小央视频), CCTV’s short video platform, on August 13. There is a Cantonese and a Mandarin version of the same video, which is spread on various channels from Weibo to Bilibili, from YouTube to iQiyi.

“Hong Kong is not a place you can do whatever you please with” is the other message promoted in the video, that uses words such as “terrorists” and “bandits” to describe the Hong Kong protesters.

The sentence that Hong Kong is not a place “to do whatever you like with” (“香港,不是你们为所欲为的地方”) comes from one of the movie scenes incorporated in the video (Hong Kong movie Cold War 2 / 寒战2).

The video is a compilation of footage using TV dramas and movies combined with actual footage from the recent protests.

By using spectacular images and dramatic film scenes, the video conveys a dramatic narrative on the Hong Kong protests, clearly portraying the Police Force as the good guys fighting against evil.

As the video is being liked and shared by thousands of web users on various platform, one popular comment on video platform Bilibili says: “No matter whether it’s a natural disaster, or a man-made disaster, we can overcome this.”

Some of the footage used in this video comes from Firestorm, a 2013 Hong Kong action film (the first 3D Hong Kong police action film). Hong Kong police thriller films Cold War and its sequel are also used, along with Hong film The White Storm (2013), Shock Wave (2017), Tactical Unit: Comrades in Arms (2009), Kill Zone (2005), crime drama Line Walker, L Storm (2018), Project Gutenberg (2018), The Menu (2015), and Chasing the Dragon and its sequal (2017/2019).

All of the fictional segments are from made-in-Hong Kong productions.

Watch the propaganda video here.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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