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Beauty Blogger Saya Accused of Attacking Pregnant Woman after Argument over Unleashed Dog

A beauty blogger shows her ugly side.

Manya Koetse

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A violent incident that happened in Hangzhou last week has attracted nationwide attention in China, after news came out that Weibo celebrity and fashion blogger Saya had attacked a pregnant woman due to an argument over her unleashed dog.

It was the number one trending topic on Sina Weibo on Monday, September 10; Weibo celebrity Saya attacking a pregnant woman during a confrontation over her dog, that was not leashed.

The incident came to light when a pregnant woman nicknamed Ci Ytt (@刺Ytt) took her story to social media.

On September 10, the story attracted nationwide attention when Chinese billionaire and famous social media persona Wang Sicong (@王思聪), who has more than 27 millions fans on Weibo, condemned internet star Saya on his social media account.

According to Ci Ytt’s post, the incident happened in Hangzhou on September 7 in front of a local hotel. The woman, 32+ weeks pregnant, was walking her leashed dog together with her husband when an unleashed bulldog suddenly charged towards her.

Protecting his wife, the husband reportedly kicked the dog, which led to an altercation with the bulldog’s owner. The pregnant woman later identified the dog’s owner as the popular Weib celebrity Saya (@Saya一).

The confrontation turned violent, with Saya and her mother, who was also there, attacking the couple. In doing so, they allegedly grabbed the pregnant woman by the hair and violently pushed her in the stomach.

Neighborhood guards soon stepped in to stop the confrontation and the pregnant woman was rushed to the hospital, where she was told she might go into preterm labor.

The woman after being rushed to hospital.

According to Sina News, local police confirmed that they were alerted by witnesses of the confrontation on September 7th, and soon arrived at the scene where a physical altercation was indeed taking place.

Short videos circulating on Weibo show Saya’s mother taken away by police. It is unclear if the case is currently still under investigation.

‘Ci Ytt’ wrote on September 9th that she was still losing blood and continued to be at high risk for premature delivery.

By September 10, the woman’s post had been shared more than 100,000 times on Weibo, receiving thousands of comments from netizens who are angry with Saya for letting her dog walk around with no leash and for attacking a pregnant woman like that.

The post by Wang Sicong condemning the case also received over 34,000 comments and 17,000 shares.

Saya, real name Chen Qing (陈清), is an online influencer and fashion entrepreneur, who runs her own Taobao shop. She has over 3,3 million Weibo fans, and is known as a fashion and beauty blogger.

One of Saya’s fashion photos.

The incident has triggered collective anger, with many people calling Saya “shameless.” Many people are especially upset that an ‘online celebrity’ (网红), known for her grace and beauty, could behave like this.

Some memes going around show the head of Saya photoshopped on the body of a dog or gorilla.

Cartoonist Yapi (@Y雅痞P) made a cartoon depicting the case.

“How can such a person be famous?”, some write. “You are a shame to Hangzhou,” others say.

Saya has not responded to the incident on her social media yet.

“People like this need to learn to abide with the law and social morals!”, one netizen writes.

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Media

CCTV New Year’s Gala 2020 Overview: Highlights and Must-Knows

What is Chinese New Year without the CCTV Spring Gala? What’s on Weibo reports the must-knows of the 2020 ‘Chunwan.’

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Chinese social media is dominated by two topics today: the CCTV New Year Gala (Chunwan) and the outbreak of the coronavirus. Watch the livestream of the CCTV Gala here, and we will keep you updated with tonight’s highlights and must-knows as we will add more information to this post throughout the night.

As the Year of the Rat is just around the corner, millions of people in China and beyond are starting the countdown to the Chinese New Year by watching the CCTV Spring Festival Gala, commonly abbreviated in Chinese as Chunwan (春晚).

The role of social media in watching the event has become increasingly important throughout the years, with topics relating to the Chunwan becoming trending days before.

Making fun of the show and criticizing it is part of the viewer’s experience, although the hashtag used for these kinds of online discussions (such as “Spring Festival Gala Roast” #春晚吐槽#) are sometimes blocked.

The Gala starts at 20.00 China Central Time on January 24. Follow live on Youtube here, or see CCTV livestreaming here.

 
About the CCTV New Year’s Gala
 

Since its very first airing in 1983, the Spring Festival Gala has captured an audience of millions. In 2010, the live Gala had a viewership of 730 million; in 2014, it had reached a viewership of 900 million, and in 2019, over a billion people watched the Gala on TV and online, making the show much bigger in terms of viewership than, for example, the Super Bowl.

The show lasts a total of four hours, and has around 30 different acts, from dance to singing and acrobatics. The acts that are both most-loved and most-dreaded are the comic sketches (小品) and crosstalk (相声); they are usually the funniest, but also convey the most political messages.

As viewer ratings of the CCTV Gala in the 21st century have skyrocketed, so has the critique on the show – which seems to be growing year-on-year.

According to many viewers, the spectacle generally is often “way too political” with its display of communist nostalgia, including the performance of different revolutionary songs such as “Without the Communist Party, There is No New China” (没有共产党就没有新中国).

To take a look at what was going on during the Spring Gala’s previous shows, also see how What’s on Weibo covered this event in 2016, in 2017, in 2018, and in 2019.

 
Live updates
 

Check for some live updates below. (We might be quiet every now and then, but if you leave this page open you’ll hear a ping when we add a new post).

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes
Follow @whatsonweibo

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©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Media

Iran “Unintentionally” Shot Down Ukrainian Airlines Flight 752

Despite the overall condemnation of Iran, there are also many pointing the fingers at the US, writing: “It’s all because of America.”

Manya Koetse

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Shortly after Iran’s military announced on Saturday that it shot down Ukrainian Airlines flight 752 on Wednesday, killing all 176 passengers on board, the topic has become the number one trending hashtag on Chinese social media platform Weibo.

In a statement by the military, Iran admitted that the Boeing 737 was flying “close to a sensitive military site” when it was “mistaken for a threat” and taken down with two missiles.

Among the passengers were 82 Iranians, 63 Canadians, 11 Ukrainians, 10 Swedes, four Afghans, three Germans, and three British nationals.

Earlier this week, Iranian authorities denied that the crash of the Ukrainian jetliner in Tehran was caused by an Iranian missile.

The conflict between US and Iran has been a much-discussed topic on Chinese social media, also because the embassies of both countries have been openly fighting about the issue on Weibo.

Although many Chinese netizens seemed to enjoy the political spectacle on Weibo over the past few days, with anti-American sentiments flaring up and memes making their rounds, today’s news about the Iranian role in the Ukrainian passenger plane crash is condemned by thousands of commenters.

“Iran is shameless!”, one popular comment says. “This is the outcome of a battle between two terrorists!”

“Regular people are paying the price for these political games,” others write: “So many lives lost, this is the terror of war.”

The Iranian Embassy in China also posted a translated statement by President Hassan Rouhani on its Weibo account, saying the missiles were fired “due to human error.”

Despite the overall condemnation, there are also many commenters pointing the fingers at the US, writing: “It’s all because of America.”

Meanwhile, the American Embassy has not published anything about the issue on its Weibo account at time of writing.

The hashtag “Iran Admits to Unintentionally Shooting Down Ukrainian Plane” (#伊朗承认意外击落乌克兰客机#) gathered over 420 million views on Weibo by Saturday afternoon, Beijing time.

Chinese state media outlet CCTV has shared an infographic about the US-Iran conflict and the passenger jet news, writing they hope that these “flames of war” will never happen again.

By Manya Koetse
Follow @whatsonweibo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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