Connect with us

Weiblog

China’s Post ’95 Generation’s Average Age for First Love is 12

According to recent research by Beijing University, China’s post-1995 adolescents are 12 when they first fall in love. On average, they have their first sexual experience at the age of 17.

Published

on

According to recent research by Beijing University, China’s post-1995 adolescents are 12 when they first fall in love. On average, they have their first sexual experience at the age of 17. China’s post-95ers are early bloomers compared to the generations before them.

recent survey by the Beijing Sociology Research Center in cooperation with Chinese dating site Baihe, published in the Chinese Love and Marriage Report (中国人婚恋状况调查报告), reveals that the post-95 generation on average have their first love experiences at the age of 12, and their first sexual experience at the age of 17,   Chinese media report.

The average age to fall in love for the first time for those born between 1980-1985 on average is 18.54. For those born after 1990, it is 15.18, and for the post 1995-ers, it is 12.17.

The first sexual experience of the post-95ers is also much earlier than those of the previous generations; for the post-1980ers, it is at the average age of 22, instead of 17.

The topic became trending on Weibo under the hashtag of “Chinese Love and Marriage Survey” (#中国人婚恋调查#), with thousands of people commenting on it.

Most netizens who respond do not seem to recognize themselves in the statistics. “I am thirty, where is my first love?!” one Weibo user wonders. “I’m lagging behind,” one netizen responds: “I am 22 and still single, I’ve never hooked up with anyone.” Another Weibo user also seems worried: “I am 26 and my sex life is non-existent,” he says with crying emoticons.

For one netizen, reading all comments on this topic has done much good: “After seeing so many people of 21 who also don’t have a boyfriend or girlfriend, I feel quite relieved,” he says.

By Manya Koetse

Image: http://v.baidu.com/cube/68084.htm

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

China Local News

Hunan Man Kills Wife by Running Over Her Twice with SUV

The 22-year-old Hunan woman was killed by her husband after unsuccessfully filing for divorce.

Published

on

WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

A fatal incident in which a man ran over his wife twice in front of an administrative office in Linxiang, Hunan, has become a trending topic on Chinese social media.

The incident happened on the morning of June 29, when the husband and wife met up to file for divorce. Due to an issue with the husband’s residence registration, they left the office unable to finalize their divorce.

The man, driving a white car, then reportedly had agreed to let his wife get some of her belongings from his car. But while approaching her by car, he suddenly sped up and hits her, after which he drove over her.

While some bystanders rushed to the victim who was laying on the sidewalk, the man turned his SUV around and ran over his wife a second time before fleeing the scene. A nearby driver captured the incident on a dash cam.

The woman, named Li, died at the hospital later that day. Li, mother of two children, was only 22 years old. The husband was later intercepted on the highway, and he has since been arrested. The case officially is still under investigation.

According to the victim’s cousin, who accompanied her to the administrative affairs office that day, the couple had since long separated and were only meeting to finalize the divorce. The cousin was just getting to her motorcycle at the parking place when Li was hit by the car.

On social media platform Weibo, hundreds of people responded to the news. “You can’t do this to anyone – let alone your own wife,” one commenter wrote, with others suggesting the man should be sentenced to death over what he did.

By Manya Koetse , with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading

China Local News

Chinese Twin Sisters Switched Identities to Illegally Travel Abroad over 30 Times

The lookalike sisters thought it was “convenient” to use each other’s passport to travel to Japan, Russia, Thailand and other countries.

Published

on

WEIBO SHORT | Weibo Shorts are concise articles on topics that are currently trending. This article was first published

On June 27, a local public security bureau in the city of Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, released a press statement regarding the peculiar case of twin sisters who used each other’s identity to travel abroad over thirty times.

The two Zhou sisters, *Hong and *Wei (pseudonyms), started switching identities when Hong’s husband, a Japanese national, returned to Japan. Hong wanted to join her husband in Japan, but her visa application was repeatedly denied due to not meeting the requirements.

Hong then decided to use her sister’s travel documents to travel to Japan to see her husband various times. She reportedly also used her sister’s passport to travel to Russia. She ended up traveling between China, Russia, and Japan at least thirty times.

Wei, who reportedly thought this way of switching identities was “convenient”, also used her sister’s passport to travel to Thailand and some other countries on four different occasions.

After authorities found out what the sisters had been up to earlier in 2022, they were advised in May to return back to China. While the case is still under investigation, the sisters are now being held for the criminal offense of border management obstruction.

The case went trending in the hot-search topic list on Weibo, where many people are wondering how this could have happened so many times. “If you exit and enter the country, aren’t fingerprints collected?”, some wondered, with others saying the border technological systems were apparently not good enough to detect such identity fraud.

There were also those who thought the story was quite “amazing” and sounded “like the plot of a television series.”

By Manya Koetse

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Contribute

Got any tips? Or want to become a contributor or intern at What's on Weibo? Email us as at info@whatsonweibo.com.
Advertisement

Become a member

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What's on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles.    

Support What’s on Weibo

What's on Weibo is 100% independent. Will you support us? Your support means we can remain independent and keep reporting on the latest China trends. Every contribution, however big or small, powers our website. Support us from as little as $1 here.

Popular Reads

Skip to toolbar