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Chinese Famous Actress Calls China’s Infant Rooms “Disastrous”

The Weibo post of popular Chinese actress Ma Yili about China’s useless baby care facilities in public places has received the support from thousands of netizens who all agree that something needs to change about China’s facilities for parents and their infants.

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The Weibo post of popular Chinese actress Ma Yili about China’s useless baby care facilities in public places has received the support from thousands of netizens who all agree that something needs to change about China’s facilities for parents and their infants.

Popular Chinese celebrity couple Ma Yili (马伊琍) and Wen Zhang (文章同學) recently shared their experiences at a baby changing room at Shanghai Airport. When Ma needed to change her daughter’s diaper, they found the infant room was useless, leaving the two embarrassed and angry.

Ma Yili published a long post on her Weibo account recently, in which she criticized the inadequate nursing facilities at the airport, calling them a “disaster”.

In her post, Ma Yili explains that her daughter was suffering from a stomach ache when they were at Shanghai Airport, and that she needed a clean diaper quickly. In the room, Ma Yili discovered there was no place to wash her hands, forcing her to use the tap in the ladies’ room. There was also no baby-changing station; her daughter needed to stand while changing the diapers. As a result, her pants were stained with poop. Even worse, according to Ma Yili, there was no hand sanitizer in the dispenser. At that time, the boarding time for her flight was approaching and she had no other choice but to throw away the dirty pants and cover her daughter with her jacket. Ma Yili shared her anger about the inadequate facilities with all of her 42 million followers.

Her post had accumulated around 240,000 likes by February 15, within just five days time, becoming a trending topic (hashtag “Ma Yili deems infant rooms useless” #马伊琍称母婴室形同虚设#). Many followers said that they were happy with Ma sharing her story, as it reflects their own experiences with baby changing rooms in China.

Ma continued to complain on Weibo that most of the nursing rooms in China fail to understand the mother’s needs and do not provide the proper equipment. Most of China’s high-end shopping malls provide proper facilities to change baby’s diapers, but this is not the case for domestic airports and railway stations.

Ma also shares her experiences as a breastfeeding mother: she visited many nursing rooms during her trips all over China but disappointedly she was unable to find one with proper wash basins and socket outlets – usually there was just a table and a chair. But except for a chair, according to Ma, breastfeeding mums also need sockets to connect breast pumps. Ma says that there have been times when she had to manually pump breast milk inside the toilet while the people waiting outside started to knock on the door telling her to hurry up.

Ma finished her post by urging train stations and airports to provide proper baby-changing stations, sinks, chairs, electrical outlets and garbage bins in all nursing rooms in the near future.
Most of the Weibo netizens agreed with Ma Yili and shared their own embarrassing situations in China’s baby changing rooms.

Weibo netizen Shanshan said: “I hope this post will get make the public more aware about mothers’ needs so that we can go out with our children in a more convenient way.”

Another mother commented that she found that nursing rooms in Japan were well-equipped with a sofa and a table, a tap for parents to wash hands, a baby changing station and a separate section for breastfeeding: “That’s why I like Japan more than China”, she says.

– By Jen Tang

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Arts & Entertainment

‘First Lady of Hong Kong TV’ Lily Leung Passes Away at Age 90

Chinese netizens pay their respects to veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (1929-2019), who passed away on August 13.

Manya Koetse

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Lily in 1996, image via Sing Tao Daily.

While the Hong Kong protests are dominating the headlines, the death of Hong Kong veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (梁舜燕) has become a top trending topic on social media site Sina Weibo under the hashtag “Hong Kong Actress Liang Shunyan Dies from Illness” (#香港演员梁舜燕病逝#).

Lily Leung, image via http://www.sohu.com/a/333418087_161795.

The actress was born in Hong Kong in 1929. She starred in dozens of television series, including the first TV drama to be locally broadcasted. She became known as “the first lady of Hong Kong TV.”

Leung acted for TVB and other broadcasters. Some of her more well-known roles were those in Kindred Spirit (真情) and Heart of Greed (溏心风暴).

Leung, also nicknamed ‘Sister Lily’ (Lily姐), passed away on August 13. According to various Chinese media reports, the actress passed peacefully surrounded by family after enduring illness. She was 90 years old.

“I’ve seen so much of her work,” many Weibo netizens say, sharing the favorite roles played by Leung. “I always watched her on TVB while growing up, and will cherish her memory,” one commenter wrote.

Another well-known Hong Kong actress, Teresa Ha Ping (夏萍), also passed away this month. She was 81 years old when she died. Her passing away also attracted a lot of attention on Chinese social media (
#演员夏萍去世#).

Many people express their sadness over the fact that not one but two grand ladies from Hong Kong’s 20th-century entertainment era have passed away this month.

“Those people from our memories pass away one by one, and it represents the passing of an era,” one Weibo user wrote.

“Two familiar faces and old troupers of Hong Kong drama – I hope they rest in peace.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Celebs

Iconic Shanghai Singer Yao Lee Passes Away at the Age of 96

Yao Li, one of the seven great singing stars of Shanghai in the 1940s, has passed away.

Manya Koetse

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Chinese singer Yao Lee (姚莉), the ‘Queen of Mandarin pop,’ passed away on July 19 at the age of 96.

The singer, with her ‘Silvery Voice,’ was known as one of the seven great singing stars (“七大歌星”) of Shanghai of the 1940s.

For those who may not know her name, you might know her music – one of her iconic songs was used in the hit movie Crazy Rich Asians.

Yao’s most famous songs include “Rose, Rose, I Love You” (玫瑰玫瑰我爱你), “Meet Again” (重逢), and “Love That I Can’t Have” (得不到的爱情).

Yao, born in Shanghai in 1922, started singing at the age of 13. Her brother Yao Min was a popular music songwriter.

When popular music was banned under Mao in the 1950s, Hong Kong became a new center of the Mandarin music industry, and Yao continued her career there.

On Weibo, the hashtag Yao Lee Passes Away (#姚莉去世#) already received more than 200 million views at time of writing.

Many Chinese netizens post candles to mourn the death of the popular singer, some call her passing “the end of an era.”

“Shanghai of those years is really where it all started,” others say.

Listen to one of Yao’s songs below:

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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