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Funny “Laowai” Rap Praising Chinese Cars Goes Viral

A catchy “rap video” featuring a foreigner praising Chinese cars has gone viral on Chinese social media.

Manya Koetse

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A catchy “rap video” featuring a foreigner praising Chinese cars has gone viral on Chinese social media.

Under the hashtag ‘laowai1 rapping on Chinese cars’ (#老外rap唱中国车#), a foreign woman talking about Chinese cars in Chinese has gone viral on Chinese social media.

The video features an interview with a woman who says in Chinese: “Go Chinese cars, go!” (“Zhōngguó chē jiāyóu!”)She states that she likes the Chinese automobile manufacturer Changan (“really, really, really good”), and that she would be happy to buy a made-in-China car.


"Funny Foreigner" Laowai Rap on Chinese Cars… bywhatsonweibo

Amongst China’s strongest car brands are names like Chang’an, Brilliance Automotive, BYD, Geely, and Chery. Although most made-in-China cars are sold within China, the exports of Chinese cars is growing.

– By Manya Koetse

1 ‘Lǎowài’ literally means “old outsider”, and is an informal Chinese term for “foreigner”.

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the founder and editor-in-chief of whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer, public speaker, and researcher (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends, digital developments, and new media in an ever-changing China, with a focus on Chinese society, pop culture, and gender issues. She shares her love for hotpot on hotpotambassador.com. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China and Covid19

Chinese Students Are Making Their Voices Heard, from Nanjing to Xi’an

“Tonight is the night when students are flooding the internet,” some on Weibo said during a dark night filled with students’ bright lights.

Manya Koetse

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The Communication University of China in Nanjing (南京传媒学院, abbr. CUCN) is trending on Weibo on Saturday night, with one hashtag receiving over 180 million views on Weibo before 23:00 local time.

Students at the university gathered on Saturday evening, chanting slogans such as “long live the people” and turning on the lights on their phone as a tribute to victims of the fire in Urumqi.

Over the past few days, there has been ongoing unrest in various parts of China. The fire that occurred in Urumqi on November 24 triggered waves of anger online (read here), and at the same time there have also been other incidents that further intensified the anger, which some also took to the street.

Another incident that attracted a lot of online attention this week happened in the Shunde District of Foshan, Guangdong, on November 24. Online, the incident was referred to as a “stampede,” but the hashtag “Foshan Stampede” (#佛山踩踏#) was soon taken offline. According to China Daily, the incident happened when a crowd of people gathered at a Covid testing place in the Xincheng community of Leliu subdistrict at about 8:30 am. The situation became chaotic when people fell down due to the slippery ground, but nobody reportedly was injured.

Nevertheless, the incident surely did not help to calm the growing tensions, especially this week when we also saw protests and unrest at Foxconn in Zhengzhou and the third consecutive daily record for new Covid cases in mainland China following by local (semi-) lockdowns across the country.

Meanwhile, on Saturday night, Weibo flooded with comments in support of the students who stood up to make their voices be heard.

“I’m not there with you, but I’m there with you,” one commenter wrote, with others posting: “Brave young people. This society is no longer giving them a way to live. History is repeating itself. If we don’t do this now, it’s our children who will have to struggle.”

“CUCN come on!” some cheered, while others wrote: “We’re proud of you.”

Some screenshots claiming to come from people at the scene said that it was the students’ intention to show solidarity with the people who passed away in the Urumqi fire and those in Xinjiang who were treated unfairly in light of the ongoing lockdowns the region saw since August of this year.

An anonymous poster warned people not to believe rumors regarding the protest being a conflict between the school leadership and the students: “The school is protecting its students, although some on the internet would like you to believe otherwise.”

Lights at the CUCN scene were allegedly turned off to prevent students from being identifiable on videos and photos.

As soon as the live commenting section on the CUCN protests was shut down by Weibo, another topic came up before midnight.

Students at the Xi’an Academy of Fine Arts (西安美术学院) were also taking their anger to the campus streets, where they allegedly demanded for freedom amid Covid lockdowns.

One commenter wrote: “Tonight is the night when students are flooding the internet, their fire [torch] will burn forever, what a magnificent night!”

“The students are very brave, they are the first to stand up. I hope the workers will stand up, and finally, all people will stand up.”

Many people on Chinese social media posted references to La Jeunesse (New Youth), a Chinese literary magazine that was founded in 1915 by Chen Duxiu and also influenced China’s May Fourth Movement (sometimes referred to as the Chinese Enlightenment), which was all about the Chinese youth being the catalyst for transformation.

“You are the heroes of the awakening,’ others wrote.

Read more about the “11.24” unrest in China here.

For more articles on the Covid situation in China, check here. If you appreciate what we do, please support us by subscribing for just a small annual fee.

By Manya Koetse , with contributions by Miranda Barnes

 

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China and Covid19

Rising Tensions in Urumqi, Local Government Announces Getting Back to “Normal Life”

“They say it’s cleared, so it is cleared. The building was on fire, now the internet is on fire.”

Manya Koetse

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A deadly fire in Urumqi triggered anger and unrest in the Xinjiang capital. After people vented their frustrations on social media and even took their anger to the streets, the local government announced on Saturday morning that the city has basically cleared Covid-19 cases at the community level.

The past two days have been filled with anger and unrest in the Xinjiang capital city Urumqi and beyond.

The direct trigger for the unrest, which led to large crowds gathering and chanting in the city streets, is the fire that broke out in a residential building on Thursday night.

On Chinese social media, the fire, which left ten people dead, caused anger among people who connected the deadly inferno to the ongoing stringent Covid measures in Urumqi, where some residents have been in (partial) lockdown for over a hundred days.

At a press conference that was held late on Friday night, local officials refuted ongoing rumors that residents had not been allowed to leave the building and also stated that any claims of doors being sealed were untrue.

The press conference, which immediately went viral on Weibo, did not subdue the online anger and instead only seemed to trigger more waves of anger, especially because one official mentioned the residents’ inability to “rescue themselves” instead of taking accountability for the devastating fire. (Urumqi Mayor Mamtimin Hadir did issue an apology to ‘all the people of Urumqi’ for the incident #乌鲁木齐市长就10死火灾事故致歉#).

A hashtag related to the Friday night press conference (#乌鲁木齐1124火灾事故发布会#) received over 1,8 billion views on Weibo.

Around the same time, on Friday night, videos and images started circulating on social media relating to protests breaking out in Urumqi. Although the topic was censored and not officially reported by Chinese media, it still turned out to be a sleepless night for many Chinese social media users who were glued to their screens, searching for the latest information.

“Knowing that people in Urumqi are out in the street marching and chanting, I cannot peacefully sleep tonight,” some wrote, with others writing that people in the streets had carried a national flag and sung the national anthem. “I hope all these warriors are safe,” some said.

Do You Hear the People Sing, one of the most recognizable songs of the Les Misérables musical, also circulated on Chinese social media as a protest song in light of all the built-up frustrations over Covid policies and the Urumqi fire. Various people posted the text: “Do you hear the people sing? Singing the song of angry men?”

On Saturday morning, November 26, the local government suddenly announced that the city has “basically cleared Covid-19 cases at the community level,” and that the city will “restore order to the lives of residents in low-risk areas in a phased manner.” Residents in low-risk areas can leave their homes while maintaining social distancing, wearing masks, and not gathering together.

On November 25, Urumqi reported a total of 116 new cases in the past 24 hours. At the time of writing, Urumqi still has 934 areas that are designated as “high-risk.”

The hashtag “Urumqi Basically Reaches Zero Covid at Community Level” (#乌鲁木齐社会面基本清零#) received 1,7 billion (!) views within hours. Another related hashtag, “Urumqi In Phases Restores Orderly Life for Residents in Low-Risk Areas” (#乌鲁木齐分阶段恢复低风险区居民生活秩序#) received over 420 million clicks.

The comments just kept flooding Weibo, where many expressed surprise and exasperation about the Covid situation seemingly changing overnight.

“Thanks to the people who took to the streets yesterday,” one commenter wrote.

“They say it’s cleared, so it is cleared. The party secretary’s word will do! The building was on fire, and now the internet is on fire,” one Weibo blogger wrote on Saturday morning.

“Hasn’t it been raining all the time? Then why do you suddenly say it’s sunny?”

Meanwhile, photos and comments from Urumqi-based netizens confirmed that some areas had indeed lifted local lockdowns and that people were roaming the streets.

Some people expressed worry that by slowly lifting the lockdowns, the anger would fade and the momentum for protest and social change would vanish: “Every time a big transformation is taking place, there will always be people settling for just a little profit.”

“We want freedom, we want democracy,” one Shanghai-based commenter wrote.

“Last night’s protests cleared the Covid,” one person concluded: “It’s like magic.”

Read more about the “11.24” unrest in China here.

For more articles on the Covid situation in China, check here. If you appreciate what we do, please support us by subscribing for just a small annual fee.

By Manya Koetse , with contributions by Miranda Barnes

 

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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