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“Muslim-Only” Shower Cabins Trigger Complaints About Muslim Privilege

A university in eastern China recently introduced Muslim-only shower cabins. The cabins, exclusive to Muslim students, offer more privacy than the regular communal showers. The new shower arrangements have fuelled discussions on Chinese social media, where many netizens are disgruntled and consider the special showers a display of muslim privilege.

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A university in eastern China recently introduced Muslim-only shower cabins. The cabins, exclusive to Muslim students, offer more privacy than the regular communal showers. The new shower arrangements have fuelled discussions on Chinese social media, where many netizens are disgruntled and consider the special showers a display of muslim privilege.

The Student Union of Anhui University of Science & Technology (安徽理工大学) recently introduced its new campus showers on Chinese social media. The new university campus communal showers has several shower cabins exclusively designed for Muslim students. News of the showers triggered a wave of complaints from Chinese netizens.

The Student Union of the Anhui University posted several pictures of its newly renovated public showers on Chinese online platform Zhihu.com on September 17. While the new communal showers have divider walls, the “Muslim-exclusive” cubicles have their own private doors.

 

“According to the Koran, showering is a private act for Muslims and should not be seen by others.”

 

The university explained the design of these cabins in an announcement:

sign

Dear Students,
According to the Koran, showering is a private act for Muslims and should not be seen by others.

Out of full respect for the customs of Muslim students, and in consideration for a growing number of Muslim students, the university opens shower areas
exclusively dedicated to Muslim students.

We hope all students will understand and respect each other, to promote integrity among ethnic groups and jointly build a beautiful home.

shower

Due to limited resources and a large number of students, Chinese universities often have communal showers that provide little or no privacy. Dozens of students shower at the same place, sometimes without any curtains or divider walls.

In the case of Anhui University of Science and Technology, the new public shower does have shower partitions, but it is only the “Muslim-exclusive” cabins that have their own doors, and thus offer complete privacy.

 

“What’s next? Muslim-only shower water?!”

 

The Muslim-exclusive shower cubicles of the Anhui University evoked heated discussions on Chinese online forums such as Baidu Tieba (百度贴吧).

For many netizens, it is not the “privilege” but the “Muslim” element that angered them. “I also have the f**cking rule that nobody should see me shower, am I going to have an exclusive shower cabin now?” one netizen writes.

“What’s next? Muslim-only shower water?!” others wondered.

The news also triggered hate speech: “Why should we treat these green maggots as masters? Why should lesser people receive better treatment?”

“All shower heads should be made into the shape of a pig”, another netizen remarks.

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This is not the first time Chinese netizens display anti-Muslim sentiments and hate speech towards so-called “Muslim privilege”. It seems that anti-Muslim sentiment is becoming more ubiquitous on Chinese social media; even the smaller news items such as the Anhui shower cabinets quickly trigger heated reactions.

 

“Does this mean islamic laws are already taking effect in China?”

 

Earlier this year, a proposal for Halal food regulation received much opposition from netizens, of whom many viewed the regulation as a symbol of Chinese islamization. When the proposal was eventually halted in April, many netizens considered it a ‘victory’.

The ‘islamization’ of China seems to be a recurring source of concern for some netizens. Author Li Mu (李牧) writes on Weibo: “There are more and more state-funded Muslim canteens, Muslim public baths, (..) who approves of this? Since some of these activities are explained through the Koran, does this mean islamic laws are already taking effect in China? We better prepare, because a big change is about to come.”

“I am already preparing,” one netizen responds: “I bought 12 classes of Islamic teachings. I listen to them every day in the car. But honestly, the more I listen, the more alarmed I get.”

 

“Chinese Muslims have become an easy target for aggressive sentiments.”

 

One young Hui Muslim recently told What’s on Weibo: “The internet has become a channel to release the negative emotions from real life. Due to the recent media discourse on Islamic extremism and its minority status, Chinese Muslims have become an easy target for aggressive sentiments.”1

There are also netizens with other points of view: “I think we should not oppose Muslim students getting separate shower cabins”, one netizen writes on Sina Weibo: “Instead, we should demand separate cabinets for everyone. After all, a shower cabinet with a door is not a privilege – but it appears to be if it is granted to some students only.”

-By Diandian Guo

1 As part of research/interview by the author for another article on this topic.

Additional editing by Manya Koetse.
©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Diandian Guo is a China-born Master student of transdisciplinary and global society, politics & culture at the University of Groningen with a special interest for new media in China. She has a BA in International Relations from Beijing Foreign Language University, and is specialized in China's cultural memory.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Thora Bora

    September 27, 2016 at 9:06 am

    This is Chinese reforms regarding minority. It may have good impact on China’s image as a long term sustainable reforms in China. I am not Chinese Muslim, however as an alien individual I have soft corner for China and its peoples to extend their reforms for their minorities. God Bless China!

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China and Covid19

‘Hard Isolation’ is Shanghai’s New Word of the Day

In line with a new ‘hard isolation’ measure, the entrances of some Shanghai residential buildings were fenced up.

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While some Shanghai households have already endured weeks of isolation, a new word was added to their epidemic vocabulary today: ‘hard isolation’ or ‘strong quarantine’ (yìng gélí 硬隔离)

The word popped up on Chinese social media on April 23rd after some Shanghai netizens posted photos of fences being set up around their community building to keep residents from walking out.

“New word: hard isolation. Shanghai is rotten to the core,” one commenter wrote.

The word soon turned into a hashtag page where people started commenting on the issue of fences being placed around residential buildings, voicing concerns on what a fence around buildings would mean for fire safety, especially after online rumors suggested that there had been a fire at one community in Pudong on Saturday night.

An official document regarding the ‘hard isolation’ measure was also shared online on Saturday. It is dated April 23, 2022, and its source is the Pudong New Area Office for Epidemic Control.

The document states that in line with the guidelines for the city’s epidemic prevention and control, the division between areas or zones that are in certain risk categories should be ‘optimized,’ with those in the high-risk category requiring a ‘hard isolation.’ Security guards should also be on duty 24 hours a day at the entrance of the buildings.

Earlier this month, Shanghai adopted “3-level control measures” after its initial phased lockdown. It means that local areas will be classified as “locked-down,” “controlled” or “precautionary,” based on their Covid19 risk.

“Could we also put fences around the homes of Shanghai leaders?”, one person suggested, while others posted images from the Walking Dead to mock the situation.

In the hope of Shanghai soon tackling the Covid situation, not everybody disagreed with the decision to fence some buildings or communities in the Pudong area: “I don’t disagree with it, as long as there is always someone there to open the fence in case of fire,” one person stated.

Although having a fence around their building is currently not a reality for most in Shanghai, the online photos of some communities seeing their buildings being fenced up is a reason to worry for some: “It’s been 40 days, and now they start hard isolation? This actually scares me. Before we know it, it’s June.”

One Weibo user asked: “Why is it possible to implement this hard isolation now? Was this created by the same persons who also implemented the rule to separate children from parents at isolation sites?”

“I truly can’t imagine why some people thought this is a good idea,” others wrote.

For more articles on the Covid-19 topics on Chinese social media, check here.

By Manya Koetse

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

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China and Covid19

‘Voices of April’: The Day After

“The best way to make videos go viral is by censoring them.”

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On April 23, a day after the video ‘Voices of April’ briefly took over social media before it was censored, the trending topic of the day is a hashtag related to new Covid cases reported in Shanghai.

Shanghai reported higher Covid-19 cases and deaths on Friday than the five days prior, which showed a daily decline in new cases. Shanghai reported a total of 23,370 new cases (including 20,634 asymptomatic ones), the municipal health commission said Saturday. A related hashtag by Xinhua News received over 910 million views on Weibo on Saturday (#上海新增本土确诊2736例无症状20634例#).

Although the hashtag was initiated by state media to inform about the Shanghai Covid situation, netizens started using it to criticize Shanghai’s handling of the crisis, with more commenters questioning China’s zero-Covid strategy. Similarly, other state media-initiated hashtag places also became online spaces where Weibo users vented their frustrations earlier this month.

Besides the ongoing online criticism and vocal disagreement with China’s Covid handling and policies, there are also many who express shock at the recent crackdown of any form of protest or criticism regarding the situation in Shanghai.

“‘Voices of April’ has been shutdown all over the internet, I’m simply dumbfounded,” one person said about the popular video that contained real recordings of events that happened during the city’s lockdown.

“If you still can find the video anywhere, forward it,” another person writes.

Besides Voices of April (四月之声), there have also been other videos over the past week that are meant to expose the mishandling of the Covid situation in Shanghai.

One of them is titled Farewell, Language (再见语言), another one is Shanghai Late Spring (上海晚春).

Farewell, Language (再见语言) is a 42-second sound art video by artist Yang Xiao (杨潇), who used over 600 commonly used propaganda phrases from Chinese official channels and randomly broadcasted the audio in the community where he lives.

The anti-epidemic workers just continue their work and do not seem to notice anything out of the ordinary at all. The video shows how this kind of language has been so normalized that for most, it has just become background noise in their everyday life – without even noticing nor critically assessing its meaning or logic anymore.

The Shanghai Late Spring (上海晚春) video is a compilation of video footage from the Shanghai lockdown, showing people struggling to get food, violent altercations between anti-epidemic workers and residents, people living in deplorable conditions in quarantine centers, and more (link to video).

The video uses the song Cheer Up London by Slaves, its chorus being:

You’re dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead, dead, already-ready
Dead, already, dead
.”

One Weibo commenter responded to the video in English, using a text from Les Misérables: “Do you hear the people sing / Singing the song of angry men / It is the music of a people / Who will not be slaves again!” The phrase “do you hear the people sing” was also used by other social media users to address the situation in Shanghai and the censorship of related topics.

“The best way to make videos go viral is by censoring them,” one commenter replied.

Read our previous article about ‘Voices of April’ here.

For more articles on the Covid-19 topics on Chinese social media, check here.

By Manya Koetse, with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Get the story behind the hashtag. Subscribe to What’s on Weibo here to receive our weekly newsletter and get access to our latest articles:

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2022 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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