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Leaving Water Taps Running In Japanese Hotels – Controversial “Act of Patriotism” Fuels Debate

Leaves the water tap running in Japanese hotels is not deemed “patriotism” by Chinese netizens.

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On September 18, the day that China commemorated the 85th anniversary of Japanese invasion in Manchuria, Chinese real estate tycoon Guo Bin posted on Weibo that he always leaves the water tap running in Japanese hotels to express patriotism. The anti-Japanese post set off a fierce discussion on Chinese social media.

“Our whole country was thoroughly bullied by a much smaller, son-of-a-b**ch country! I never use any Japanese products, and I even leave all hotel water taps running when I am in Japan. It’s despicable but I enjoy it.”

This is what Guo Bin (郭斌), real estate tycoon and husband of Chinese Olympic table tennis champion Wang Nan (王楠), posted on Sina Weibo on September 18.

September 18 marks the Japanese invasion of Manchuria (northeast China). The day is seen as the beginning of Japanese invasion of China and is associated with the phrase “never forget national humiliation” (勿忘国耻), which is often used to indicate China’s historical grievances.

Table tennis star Wang Nan showed support of her husband by reposting his post, writing: “I give this post a ‘like’! Never forget September 18!”

guobinGuo Bin and Wang Nan.

The anti-Japanese post soon attracted much criticism from netizens. Many commented that Guo’s behaviour is not patriotic, but naive and uncivilised.

 

“Wasting water is not the way to show patriotism.”

 

Many netizens point out that by leaving the hotel taps running, Guo Bin is wasting valuable water and there is no justification for it. As one netizen writes: “One should never do such things that harm others and don’t do us any good either. If you have the Earth and humanity in heart, you wouldn’t waste valuable resources”.

For some netizens, the problem of Guo’s supposed “patriotism” lies in its hatred and irrationality. “This kind of uneducated behaviour will only make people look down on us, especially by using bad words such as ‘little Japan’ (小日本)”, one netizen says: “We should use this time to improve our lives and our character. Patriotism has nothing to do with name calling.”

“Such hatred is blind and worthless”, writes another netizen: “Education of the people does not start with hatred against Japan, but with a love for ourselves.”

This is not the first time irrational patriotic sentiment or behaviour draws the attention of Chinese netizens. In 2012, large-scale anti-Japanese demonstrations broke out in many cities across China. A Chinese man who owned a Japanese car was left permanently disabled by demonstrators in Xi’an.

anti-japan

More recently, after the South China Sea verdict, many Chinese turned against foreign brands, with people “boycotting KFC” (抵制肯德基 ) in several cities across China.

Strong patriotism also spread online, with sayings such as “South China Sea verdict, who cares” and “China is father of the Philippines” becoming trending.

With a domestic discourse of China as a major rising power, patriotism is ubiquitous on Chinese social media. But it is also clear that many people do not agree with the explicit expression of negative sentiments that come with strong hatred and irrationality.

As one netizen notes: “The real rise of a powerful China won’t be attained by people with low morality and bad behaviour.”

-By Diandian Guo

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Diandian Guo is a China-born Master student of transdisciplinary and global society, politics & culture at the University of Groningen with a special interest for new media in China. She has a BA in International Relations from Beijing Foreign Language University, and is specialized in China's cultural memory.

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China Arts & Entertainment

‘First Lady of Hong Kong TV’ Lily Leung Passes Away at Age 90

Chinese netizens pay their respects to veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (1929-2019), who passed away on August 13.

Manya Koetse

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Lily in 1996, image via Sing Tao Daily.

While the Hong Kong protests are dominating the headlines, the death of Hong Kong veteran actress Lily Leung Shun-Yin (梁舜燕) has become a top trending topic on social media site Sina Weibo under the hashtag “Hong Kong Actress Liang Shunyan Dies from Illness” (#香港演员梁舜燕病逝#).

Lily Leung, image via http://www.sohu.com/a/333418087_161795.

The actress was born in Hong Kong in 1929. She starred in dozens of television series, including the first TV drama to be locally broadcasted. She became known as “the first lady of Hong Kong TV.”

Leung acted for TVB and other broadcasters. Some of her more well-known roles were those in Kindred Spirit (真情) and Heart of Greed (溏心风暴).

Leung, also nicknamed ‘Sister Lily’ (Lily姐), passed away on August 13. According to various Chinese media reports, the actress passed peacefully surrounded by family after enduring illness. She was 90 years old.

“I’ve seen so much of her work,” many Weibo netizens say, sharing the favorite roles played by Leung. “I always watched her on TVB while growing up, and will cherish her memory,” one commenter wrote.

Another well-known Hong Kong actress, Teresa Ha Ping (夏萍), also passed away this month. She was 81 years old when she died. Her passing away also attracted a lot of attention on Chinese social media (
#演员夏萍去世#).

Many people express their sadness over the fact that not one but two grand ladies from Hong Kong’s 20th-century entertainment era have passed away this month.

“Those people from our memories pass away one by one, and it represents the passing of an era,” one Weibo user wrote.

“Two familiar faces and old troupers of Hong Kong drama – I hope they rest in peace.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Celebs

Iconic Shanghai Singer Yao Lee Passes Away at the Age of 96

Yao Li, one of the seven great singing stars of Shanghai in the 1940s, has passed away.

Manya Koetse

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Chinese singer Yao Lee (姚莉), the ‘Queen of Mandarin pop,’ passed away on July 19 at the age of 96.

The singer, with her ‘Silvery Voice,’ was known as one of the seven great singing stars (“七大歌星”) of Shanghai of the 1940s.

For those who may not know her name, you might know her music – one of her iconic songs was used in the hit movie Crazy Rich Asians.

Yao’s most famous songs include “Rose, Rose, I Love You” (玫瑰玫瑰我爱你), “Meet Again” (重逢), and “Love That I Can’t Have” (得不到的爱情).

Yao, born in Shanghai in 1922, started singing at the age of 13. Her brother Yao Min was a popular music songwriter.

When popular music was banned under Mao in the 1950s, Hong Kong became a new center of the Mandarin music industry, and Yao continued her career there.

On Weibo, the hashtag Yao Lee Passes Away (#姚莉去世#) already received more than 200 million views at time of writing.

Many Chinese netizens post candles to mourn the death of the popular singer, some call her passing “the end of an era.”

“Shanghai of those years is really where it all started,” others say.

Listen to one of Yao’s songs below:

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. Please note that your comment below will need to be manually approved if you’re a first-time poster here.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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