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‘Humiliating’ Korean K-Swiss Commercial Enrages Chinese Netizens, Fuels Anti-Korean Sentiment

A Korean commercial by American footwear company K-Swiss has recently sparked outrage on Chinese social media. The ad video depicts an alleged Chinese character in a way that is called “insulting” and “humiliating” to China. The controversy fuels anti-Korean sentiments amidst current China-South Korea tensions, negatively impacting the popularity and presence of Korean pop culture in the PRC.

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A Korean commercial by American footwear company K-Swiss has recently sparked outrage on Chinese social media. The ad video depicts an alleged Chinese character in a way that is called “insulting” and “humiliating” to China. The controversy fuels anti-Korean sentiments amidst China-South Korea tensions, negatively impacting the popularity and presence of Korean pop culture in the PRC.

On August 3, Sina News, along with several other Chinese media, reported that popular Korean actor Park Bo Gum (朴宝剑) appeared in a commercial that is “insulting to China”. The message states that it is unreasonable for Park “to make money in China” and then “humiliate Chinese people”.

Park Bo Gum is famous in mainland China, where Korean popular culture has been booming since the early 2000s. The major popularity of Korean pop culture in the PRC is also referred to as Hallyu, or “Korean Wave”.

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The K-Swiss commercial caused a storm of criticism on Chinese social media, where the Sina News post alone was already shared over 5700 times, liked 21,000 times, and receiving more than 19,500 comments within 48 hours after it was posted. Other accounts posting about the video also received thousands of comments, making the issue a trending topic on Sina Weibo, using hashtags like “Korean commercial vilifies The Great Wall [China]” (#韩国广告丑化万里长城#).

“He [Park] comes to China to fill his pockets and then ridicules us,” one of the top comments says. Other Weibo users say Park is “no longer a pop idol” in their eyes or in their country (“国家面前无偶像”), and call him “deceitful” and “no longer welcome in China”.

Controversial game of chess

The 50-second commercial for K-Swiss, an American apparel company, shows Park playing a the Go board game against an alleged Chinese rival named ‘The Great Wall’ (万里长城). Like chess, Go is a strategy board game in which the aim is to surround more territory than the opponent. The game originated from ancient China, and is considered one of the oldest and most refined Chinese strategy games.

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After showing how the ‘Chinese’ player makes a move and just when it is Park’s turn, the commercial shifts to a party scene where the two players are dancing on the chess board. Park, in his K-Swiss sneakers, is portrayed as a popular kid with smart moves, his opponent is somewhat clumsy, chubby, and unfashionable. Not only does he have bad dancing skills, he is also slapped by a woman on the dance floor – a move that is laughed about by Park.

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Back to the actual chess game, Park finally makes the winning move. As the Chinese name of his opponent [“Great Wall”] is clearly visible, the sound of a goat bleating is played and the commercial ends with a happy Park.

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Shutting out Korean stars due to THAAD

By now, the commercial has become highly controversial on Chinese social media, where a majority of netizens denounce it, finding it insulting and discriminatory to China. Many netizens argue that Park should no longer be welcomed in China after choosing to feature in this commercial. “It is not without reason that we’re shutting out Korean stars,” one netizen comments.

The netizen refers to the recent request made by the Chinese State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT) to China’s major broadcasting firms, asking them to ban South Korean celebrities from making appearances on television entertainment shows starting next month, The Korea Herald reports.

The request was preceded by a series of sudden cancellations of appearances by Korean stars in China; a Chinese fan meeting with Korean stars Kim Woo Bin and Bae Suzy was “abruptly postponed” earlier this week. The popular Korean actor Lee Jun-ki will not be able to attend the opening of his most recent movie in China due to “visa issues”, and scheduled PRC concerts by Korean bands such as Snuper and Wassup have also been canceled by Chinese organizers for “no specific reason”.

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The apparent crackdown on China’s “Korean wave” comes after Beijing’s vehement opposition to South Korea’s THAAD (Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense) deployment. Last July, South Korea and the US announced their final decision to deploy the THAAD system in the south against North Korea’s missile and nuclear threats. The plan has angered Chinese leaders, who see the system as a possible security threat to the PRC.

The opposition to THAAD has now spilled over into popular culture, and South Korean businesses fear it might further influence their trade relations to China.

The huge controversy over the K-Swiss commercial comes at a moment when China-South Korea relations are strained over THAAD. Fragments of the commercial on YouTube from January 2016 suggest that this commercial has been around for at least 7 months, which makes the timing for Chinese state media to put forward news about this ‘recent’ commercial more questionable.

The commercial has nevertheless fuelled anti-Korean sentiments, as Chinese netizens claim to be “furious”, taking the representation of the man called ‘Great Wall’ in the ad video as the way South-Koreans perceive Chinese. “It is not that we want to curse you Koreans, but you disrespect us and look down on China. Your commercial might say ‘Great Wall’, but it is actually directed against all of China. Even I don’t always think China is that harmonious, but when it comes to foreign countries, we need to be patriotic!”, one netizen writes.

While Weibo is overflowing with anti-Korean and China-loving comments, actor Park Bo Gum is quickly losing followers on his official Weibo account, where his latest fan post received thousands of angry comments over the past two days. “I always liked you so much,” one disappointed fan writes: “I never expected this from you.”

What’s on Weibo video blog about the recent controversy on the Korean K-Swiss commercial: discrimination of China?

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, Sino-Japanese relations and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. justsomeguy69

    November 16, 2016 at 2:46 am

    LOL whiney chiney. Grow up, all of you. No one on the planet likes you, loud, rude, no manners at all, disgusting, spitting, shitting in public, destorying property including millenia-old monuments, committing fraud all day every day. When kids do not play well with others, they are excluded. What do you think the world will do with you? Permanently put you away. All of you

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China Comic & Games

China’s Latest Online Viral Game Makes You Clap for Xi Jinping

Smart propaganda – now clapping for Xi Jinping has become a competition.

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In a new online game that has come out during the 19th National Congress in Beijing, Chinese netizens can compete in applauding for Xi Jinping. The game has become an online hit.

The major 19th CPC National Congress started on Wednesday in Beijing with a speech by Chinese President Xi Jinping that took nearly 3,5 hours.

The speech, that focused on China’s future and its rise in the world today, was repeatedly paused for the appropriate applause from the party members in the audience.

With the introduction of a new game by Tencent, people can now also clap along to Xi Jinping’s speech from their own living room. The game became an online hit on October 18. It was already played over 400 million times by 9 pm Beijing time.

The mobile game can be opened through a link that takes you to a short segment of the lengthy speech by Xi Jinping. In the short segment, President Xi mentions that it is the mission of the Communist Party of China to strive for the happiness and the rise of the Chinese people.

The app then allows you “clap” for Xi by tapping the screen of your phone as many times as you can within a time frame of 18 seconds. After completing, you can invite your friends to play along and compete with them.

The game has become especially popular on WeChat, where some users boast that they have scored a ‘clap rate’ of 1695.

If you’re up to it, you can try to clap as much as you can for Xi Jinping here (mobile only).
(Update Friday, October 20: the game link now redirects to the Tencent News site themed around the 19th Party Congress through desktop. On mobile, the game still works, and has been played over 1,2 billion times.)

With a score of 1818 you’re better than 99% of all players.

By Manya Koetse and Diandian Guo

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Celebs

Weibo Servers Down After Lu Han Announces New Relationship

A Chinese celebrity’s relationship announcement led to a rare breakdown of Weibo’s servers on Sunday.

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A Chinese celebrity’s relationship announcement led to a rare breakdown of Weibo’s servers on Sunday. So many fans commented on Lu Han’s new love affair that the social media platform was inaccessible for two hours.

“Hi everyone, I want to introduce my girlfriend @GuanXiaoTong to you.” It was this one-sentence message that set Weibo on fire on Sunday, October 8.

The message was posted by Chinese singer and actor Lu Han (鹿晗 1990), who is one of the most popular celebrities on Weibo. Lu currently has 41.2 million followers on his official Weibo account (@M鹿M).

The singer previously had 43 million fans on Weibo, but lost many followers after his relationship announcement. Many fans did not like the idea that their favorite star is no longer single. Lu was formerly a member of the South Korean-Chinese boy group EXO and its sub-group EXO-M.

So many people responded to the news of Lu Han’s new girlfriend that some servers of Sina Weibo experienced a rare breakdown. Chinese media report that, according to a statement released by a Weibo Data Assistant, the two-hour network crash was the result of a data surge caused by fans commenting, sharing and liking Lu Han’s update.

By Monday, the public announcement had received 2,4 million comments and nearly 5 million likes.

Guan Xiaotong (关晓彤) is Lu Han’s new girlfriend – and everybody knows it.

Guan Xiaotong is a Chinese actress with more than 20 million fans on her Weibo page.

It is not the first time that a public announcement by a Chinese celebrity causes so much consternation on Weibo. In 2016, Chinese actor Wang Baoqiang announced that he would divorce his wife Ma Rong after she had a secret affair with his own agent. That post became one of the top-trending topics of the year.

A day after Lu Han’s revelation, searches for his name on the Weibo platform were limited and only showed a “we can not display any results for this search” announcement.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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