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Missing Chinese Student Turns up in Hong Kong Prison

A 21-year-old student from Shenzen University who went missing this week during a shopping trip to Hong Kong has now turned up. The young woman, whose name and photo is all over social media, has been arrested for shoplifting – and now everybody knows it. “A single slip might cause everlasting damage,” many people say.

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A 21-year-old student from Shenzen University who went missing this week during a shopping trip to Hong Kong has now turned up. The young woman, whose name and photo is all over social media, has been arrested for shoplifting – and now everybody knows it. “A single slip might cause everlasting damage,” many say.

News about a young woman from Shenzhen going missing in Hong Kong has drawn wide attention on Chinese social media this week. After the woman, Luo X., had left for Hong Kong on a shopping spree, her cell phone was turned off. Worried friends and family could not reach her for 2-3 days.

It now turns out that the female student from Shenzhen University has been arrested in Hong Kong for shoplifting. Chinese media report that Luo was caught stealing over 2000 RMB (±300$) of products in cosmetic & drug stores.

In the search for the ‘missing’ woman, her personal information and photos were already widely shared on social media before the story took a sharp turn.

One of the reasons the story initially drew so much attention is because this summer has already seen multiple stories on Chinese women going missing while traveling. In June, a student disappeared while studying in the United States. Two sisters were found murdered in Japan in July, and a female teacher from China was reported missing last week.

The case of Luo X. became the most-searched topic on Baidu on August 2.

On Weibo, the story has attracted thousands of comments and shares today. It also became the number 1 searched topic on Baidu on August 2. Many people call the whole story “a loss of face,” since all of Luo’s personal information is on social media now. “Normally the media always blurs the face of shoplifters, but now her face and name already is everywhere,” one person commented.

Some people note that it might be hard for the girl to return to her university and find work now that her details have been so widely publicized. “A single slip might cause everlasting sorrow” (“一失足成千古恨”), a typical comment said.

Before it turned out that Luo was arrested in Hong Kong, Shenzhen University referred to her as a “candidate for their graduate program,” now they only refer to her as “a student.”

Many people joke: “No person has been lost, there’s just a person who lost face” (literally: “There’s no person missing, there’s a ‘lost person'”, meaning someone who has lost face “人没丢,但丢人了”).

“So shameful for her, I will pray for this girl,” some netizens say.

There are also many people on Weibo who find the situation not just shameful for the woman, but for mainland Chinese in general, who already have a bad reputation in Hong Kong: “Couldn’t you find stuff to steal in the mainland? Now you’ve given the Hong Kong people another mainlander to scold..”

“It’s good that she has been found. Although it’s embarrassing, at least her parents can have a peace of mind now,” one commenter says.

Multiple sources report that Luo X. will remain in custody for 14 days.

By Miranda Barnes

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Miranda Barnes is a Chinese blogger and parttime translator with a strong interest in Chinese media and culture. Born in Shenyang, she now lives in Beijing with her British husband. On www.abearandapig.com they will share news of their upcoming year-long trip around Australasia, East & Central Asia, and the Indian Subcontinent.

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China Local News

Woman Kicked Out on Highway Off-ramp by Boyfriend over Spring Festival Argument

He put her out of the car, but their relationship is still on.

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News of a Chinese woman being kicked out of the car beside a high-speed road by her boyfriend is making its rounds on Weibo today. What many netizens are especially astonished about, is that the couple is still together.

On February 20, Chinese newspaper People’s Daily reported on Weibo that a woman was kicked out of the car by her boyfriend on Sunday while driving home to celebrate Chinese New Year.

The incident occurred at the Zhejiang Hangzhou highway. Local traffic police spotted the woman walking by herself on the off-ramp, carrying a suitcase.

The woman reportedly was visibly upset and told the police that she was on her way to her Anhui hometown with her boyfriend when they got into an argument and he kicked her out of the car.

Footage of the woman wandering about the side of the highway was published on Weibo by online media outlet Pear Video, and was shared hundreds of times on Chinese social media on Tuesday.

As reported by various Chinese news outlets, the woman’s boyfriend was later tracked down by police and apologized for leaving his girlfriend beside the highway. After a police mediation, the couple still continued their way to the New Year’s festivities together.

“Why didn’t she break up with him?!” many commenters on the news wonder.

“If you’re looking for a marriage partner, don’t pick him from a garbage dump,” some wrote.

Others warn the woman that her boyfriend’s current actions are a bad omen for the future: “Now he’ll throw you out of the car together with your suitcase, later he’ll throw you out of the car together with your child.”

“If there’s a first time, there’ll always be second time,” many netizens also said.

In 2016, a fighting couple also shocked the online community when footage of a man putting his wife in the back of his car trunk at a Hebei gas station went viral on Weibo.

A day after the incident, the woman said she would not press charges against her own husband, igniting discussions over whether or not the man should be punished anyway for the abuse – regardless of whether or not she would press charges.

As for the couple in today’s new feature, most netizens just hope for one thing: “Whatever you do, do not marry him!”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Local News

Shanghai Police Releases Surveillance Footage of Dumbest Burglars Ever

If all burglars were this stupid, the police wouldn’t need to work overtime.

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On February 14, the official Weibo account of the Shanghai Public Security Bureau (@上海市公安局官方微博) released a video on its channel that is going viral on Chinese social media today. The video was captured through surveillance cameras after midnight.

The video shows two burglars attempting to break in when something goes terribly wrong – see the video for yourself, although some viewer discretion is advised.

“If all burglars were like this, we wouldn’t need to work overtime,” the Shanghai Public Security Bureau writes.

“You might not need to work overtime, but the nurses and doctors at the hospital surely will,” some netizens reply.

The video was watched 4 million times shortly after it was published on Weibo. Further information on how the unfortunate burglar is currently doing has not been released.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2017

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