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Missing Chinese Student Turns up in Hong Kong Prison

A 21-year-old student from Shenzen University who went missing this week during a shopping trip to Hong Kong has now turned up. The young woman, whose name and photo is all over social media, has been arrested for shoplifting – and now everybody knows it. “A single slip might cause everlasting damage,” many people say.

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A 21-year-old student from Shenzen University who went missing this week during a shopping trip to Hong Kong has now turned up. The young woman, whose name and photo is all over social media, has been arrested for shoplifting – and now everybody knows it. “A single slip might cause everlasting damage,” many say.

News about a young woman from Shenzhen going missing in Hong Kong has drawn wide attention on Chinese social media this week. After the woman, Luo X., had left for Hong Kong on a shopping spree, her cell phone was turned off. Worried friends and family could not reach her for 2-3 days.

It now turns out that the female student from Shenzhen University has been arrested in Hong Kong for shoplifting. Chinese media report that Luo was caught stealing over 2000 RMB (±300$) of products in cosmetic & drug stores.

In the search for the ‘missing’ woman, her personal information and photos were already widely shared on social media before the story took a sharp turn.

One of the reasons the story initially drew so much attention is because this summer has already seen multiple stories on Chinese women going missing while traveling. In June, a student disappeared while studying in the United States. Two sisters were found murdered in Japan in July, and a female teacher from China was reported missing last week.

The case of Luo X. became the most-searched topic on Baidu on August 2.

On Weibo, the story has attracted thousands of comments and shares today. It also became the number 1 searched topic on Baidu on August 2. Many people call the whole story “a loss of face,” since all of Luo’s personal information is on social media now. “Normally the media always blurs the face of shoplifters, but now her face and name already is everywhere,” one person commented.

Some people note that it might be hard for the girl to return to her university and find work now that her details have been so widely publicized. “A single slip might cause everlasting sorrow” (“一失足成千古恨”), a typical comment said.

Before it turned out that Luo was arrested in Hong Kong, Shenzhen University referred to her as a “candidate for their graduate program,” now they only refer to her as “a student.”

Many people joke: “No person has been lost, there’s just a person who lost face” (literally: “There’s no person missing, there’s a ‘lost person'”, meaning someone who has lost face “人没丢,但丢人了”).

“So shameful for her, I will pray for this girl,” some netizens say.

There are also many people on Weibo who find the situation not just shameful for the woman, but for mainland Chinese in general, who already have a bad reputation in Hong Kong: “Couldn’t you find stuff to steal in the mainland? Now you’ve given the Hong Kong people another mainlander to scold..”

“It’s good that she has been found. Although it’s embarrassing, at least her parents can have a peace of mind now,” one commenter says.

Multiple sources report that Luo X. will remain in custody for 14 days.

By Miranda Barnes

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Miranda Barnes is a Chinese blogger and parttime translator with a strong interest in Chinese media and culture. Born in Shenyang, she now lives in Beijing with her British husband. On www.abearandapig.com they share news of their year-long trip around Europe and Asia.

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China Local News

World’s Largest Terminal: Spectacular Photos of Beijing’s New Airport

The city’s new international airport will be the biggest one in the world.

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Its opening is more than a year from now, but Beijing’s new international airport is already a spectacular sight.

Beijing’s new airport, that is expected to open in fall of 2019, is attracting some attention on Chinese social media lately as construction work on the major airport is speeding up.

A 7,200 tons and 404.5-meter-long roof was placed on the airport’s no.1 hangar earlier this week.

The airport is located in southern Beijing in Daxing (大兴区), and is expected to welcome some 72 million travelers per year in the future. The terminal area will cover some 700,000 square meter.

Photo of the upcoming airport posted on Weibo by @永定河孔雀城

According to Sina News, at most 8000 builders are working on the construction site at the same time.

The terminal building was designed by ADPI in collaboration with, amongst other consultants, Zaha Hadid Architects, who are known for their futuristic structures.

The airport is also called the “alien base” (外星人基地) by some netizens due to its extraordinary size and design.

Dozens of photos of the airport construction site are circulating on Weibo.

Photographer Chou Gui (@chougui17) posted a collection of various photos of the upcoming airport on their Weibo account.

Chinese state media propagate Beijing’s Daxing International Airport as being “100% China-made.” Located in the Daxing district of southern Beijing, it will become an important part of the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei city cluster.

You might also like to read: Real-Life Fairy Tale Landscape: Abandoned Fishing Village Houtouwan.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Local News

Chongqing Man Throws Golden Retriever and Cat from 21st Floor

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A brutal case of pet killing has shocked Chinese social media users this week. On September 6, a man from the Shapingba district of Chongqing threw his golden retriever and a pregnant cat from the 21st floor of an apartment building. Both animals died.

Various Chinese media report that the man supposedly committed the cruel act after learning his wife was pregnant and not wanting her to keep pets in the house while expecting. After an argument with his wife, he allegedly threw the pets out of the window.

Shocked neighbors told reporters that the incident occurred around five o’clock on Thursday, when they heard a loud thump and found the animals on the pavement.

Some neighbours recognized the animals, as their own dog would play with the golden retriever. They called the pet owner, who said he no longer wanted anything to do with the dog and the cat. The neighbors, some crying, later gave the dog and cat a respectful burial.

On Weibo, the hashtag “Man Throws Dog and Cat from 21st Floor” (#男子21楼扔下一猫一狗#) was viewed almost three million times.

Animal cruelty often becomes a topic of debate on Weibo. One of the biggest social media trending cases of animal abuse of the past years is that of the dog Lion, who went missing in December of 2017 and was found by a woman named He Hengli who then blackmailed the dog’s owner over its release.

When the ‘hostage negotiations’ reached a deadlock, the dog’s owner finally went to He’s apartment to fetch her dog together with police offers and reporters. While they knocked the door, Lion was thrown to his death from He’s sixth story apartment.

The story of ‘Lion,’ who was killed by the person who held him ‘hostage’, went viral on Weibo in January 2018.

As in many cases in which animal cruelty has been exposed on social media, Lion’s killer became a target of the so-called ‘human flesh search engine,’ with people leaking her personal information online and threatening her at her workplace and home.

Such cases have previously even led to mob justice, with people dragging abusers out of their homes and beating them.

People often resort to this kind of ‘jungle justice’ because China currently has no laws preventing animal abuse. The voices calling for legal protection of animals in China have gotten louder over the past years.

“I just cannot understand these kinds of people’s way of thinking,” one commenter said: “They now throw a dog, what will they throw next time?”

“[If you no longer want your pets], you could just give them away, instead of cruelly throwing them to their death. Also – if someone would’ve walked there, they might have died, too,” others wrote.

Some write: “If someone mistreats an animal it’s a clear sign they’re abnormal maniacs,” with many others worrying about the future child of the pet killer: “He’s surely not fit to be a father.”

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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