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“Too Loud, Too Rude”: Switzerland Introduces Separate Trains for Chinese Tourists

Switzerland has introduced special coaches for Chinese tourists, as locals consider them to be ‘loud’ and ‘rude’. The news has triggered mixed reactions amongst Weibo’s netizens.

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Switzerland has introduced special coaches for Chinese tourists, as locals consider them to be ‘loud’ and ‘rude’. The news has triggered mixed reactions amongst Weibo’s netizens.

According to China’s National Tourism Administration (中国国家旅游管理局), China now sends more tourists abroad than any other country in the world. The number of Chinese outbound tourists exceeded 100 million in 2014, spending $155 billion.

Although destination countries welcome the money spent by Chinese travelers, locals often can’t stand the chaos and hassle some Chinese tourists bring to their countries. They consider them to be loud, rude, pushy, and all over the place.

 

“They’re loud and rude, and spit on the floor.”

 

Such is the case in Switzerland, visited by one million Chinese tourists every year. Locals and Swiss tourists often feel harassed by the Chinese, Heute reports, especially on the famous Rigi Railways. Chinese tourists are said to be “loud and rude”, and they “spit on the floor”. Their misbehavior has lead Rigi Railways to take special measures: since August there are extra trains for ‘Asian tourists’, and from September extra ones for ‘international guests’. There are also special signs on the toilet explaining tourists how (not) to use the toilet, according to Heute.

Although Rigi Railways officially has opened extra train carriages for ‘Asian guests’, a local Swiss newspaper clearly stated they were especially meant for Chinese, its headline being: “Zu laut, zu frech – Schweiz führt Extra-Züge für Chinesen ein” (“Too Loud, Too Rude: Switzerland Introduces Extra Trains for Chinese Tourists”).

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The newspaper also published one of the train’s illustrations that instruct tourists to sit on toilet seats rather than to squat on them. The railway company assumes that Chinese tourists often stand on the toilet, and don’t clean their footprints afterwards.

 

“Some Chinese have bad manners, but we’re not all like that.”

 

Once the news was posted on Sina Weibo on August 25th, it gained nearly 2000 comments in one day. The reactions were mixed.

Many users consider it to be discrimination against Chinese tourists. User “Shiya” doubts Europeans can tell the differences between Asians: “They can’t distinguish the different Asians from different countries. Chinese, Japanese and Koreans probably look the same to them. Why are they so sure that the footprints are left by Chinese? The news says that the extra coaches are meant for Asians. However, it tried to draw the public’s attention by emphasizing it is for Chinese in the title. This is discrimination.”

User “Luoluo” follows: “I thought people from western countries advocate freedom and equality, and that they oppose to discrimination. But to me, this [the news] is pure and simple discrimination. I admit that some Chinese don’t really have good manners, but it doesn’t mean we are all like that. I’m fed up that we are blamed for all the uncivilized behavior by Asians. Of course we need to stand up against misbehaviour, but we can’t endure the discrimination.”

 

“If you’re used to squatting, you just can’t poo by sitting on the toilet.”

 

Some users try to explain the culture of squatting on the toilet in China. Although ‘western-style’ toilets are popular in China’s bigger cities and airports, there are still lots of squatting toilets, especially in rural areas. Weibo user “JaneyPan” says that from a physiological standpoint, squatting is the best toilet position. “If you are used to squatting, you just can’t poo by sitting on the toilet. But I agree that we need to clean the footprints afterwards.” She then adds: “Maybe the Switzerland railway should consider building squatting toilets on the carriages meant for Chinese tourists.”

 

“They think they can do anything they want because they have money.”

 

A large number of netizens also self-reflect, saying it is high time to promote civilized behaviour amongst Chinese travelers, and restore the country’s image. User “Beer Happiness” comments: “Many Chinese now want to travel abroad to see the world as we are getting wealthy. Yet, a small amount of Chinese tourists with low quality have damaged our nation’s image. Most foreigners haven’t been to China. They know things about China through the news. That’s why they think all Chinese people are rude.”

The Switzerland railway issue is not the first case where Chinese tourists are treated differently. Earlier this year, Mainland Chinese tourists were temporarily banned from entering the Wat Rong Khun temple, one of the top tourist destinations in Chiang Rai, Thailand, because of inappropriate toilet usage. The temple was reopened to Chinese tourists on the condition that their tour guides would be held responsible for cleaning the toilets. As user “Xj” suggests: “The tour guide should give etiquette lessons to its clients, especially to the middle-aged tourists. They think can do anything they want because they have money. This is wrong.”

The Chinese government has taken actions to stop the uncivilized behaviour of Chinese tourists abroad. The National Tourism Administration has started to track the actions of Chinese citizens abroad since last year April. Provincial and national authorities will be in touch with unruly citizens upon their return to China. This measurement came into effect after a group of Chinese travelers scalded a flight attendant with hot water and threatened to blow up a plane from Bangkok to Nanjing.

“The saddest thing when traveling abroad is to witness the bad behaviour of our people. They really harm China’s reputation,” says user “FPA”: “I understand the intention of these foreign countries who treat Chinese tourists differently. I mean, who wants to travel with Chinese tourists who are loud, rude and fight over small things?” In the end, like a lot of other netizens, user “FPA” calls on Chinese travelers to respect the locals and their culture: “We are making progress on this. I just hope foreign countries won’t discriminate against us.”

By Yiying Fan

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88 Comments

88 Comments

  1. Scott Thomas

    February 27, 2016 at 1:03 am

    Comedian Ralphie May had a great joke about his expirence with Chinese tourist. I’m sure he’ll breath a sigh of relief knowing he’s not wrong

    • Peter

      January 28, 2017 at 11:01 am

      All too true I’m married to a mainland Chinese lady the problem is the sense of “me” with no respect of the common good . It’s your country let them respect it , if the push in push them out if they spit make it clear they’re pigs etc . My wife’s unusually clean and shudders at her fellow country men .

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    • Jimbo

      June 3, 2018 at 7:31 pm

      At least they dont come to other countries and steal resources and artifacts. Only people with manners do that, right?

  2. Peter Jones

    April 5, 2016 at 10:44 am

    When you go to other countries you respect their rules and cultures. True that not all Chinese are like that but that does not mean you, as a country, is not held responsible for the actions of your citizens. If your citizens are not ready then don’t let them go abroad. Create some kind of filtering system to filter out those people who behave badly, for example having at least a decent degree of education, or passing an etiquette exam. If after all those and they still misbehave then impose a three strike out policy with heavy fines for each strike. Install bathrooms especially for Chinese people? There’s a joke. You don’t go to other people’s house and demand that your different behaviour be, not only tolerated, but also accommodated. ‘I used to have a lamp in my house, therefore you must have a lamp in your house so I feel good’. No that is not how it works. The host country, has every right to discriminate if it deems fit, much like how you have a right in your house to put a guest in a separate room if they are annoying other family member of yours. Cultural difference? Not anyone else’s problem, you need to sort your citizens out.

    • Diandian GUO

      April 7, 2016 at 1:09 pm

      Hey I think two aspects of your respond troubles me
      1) I don’t think being “civilized” can be a criteria to restrain individual mobility. That is violation of human rights. While I agree that etiquettes while travelling needs to be better observed, this is simply not a reason to DENY people’s right to travel.
      2) While China is often accused of having too strong a government, it is strange that when it comes to civic issues, the state is called upon to “sort things out”. It is paradoxical that a discourse that urge Chinese government to be less nosy requires its steadfast measures in socio-cultural issues. I don’t think government intervention is the ultimate solution. It relies on travelling businesses’ sense of responsibility, to organize their trips in a more plausible way. But it also relies on individuals. It is those who DO observe the etiquettes that may gradually influence the rest. “Discriminating” will only create an environment that encourage improper behaviour.

      I admit that as a Chinese studying in Europe, I sometimes feel awkward to see Chinese tourist groups. I think due to historical and indeed cultural reasons, China’s social life is organized around the self instead of the us, thus there is no clear definition of “public sphere” in traditional Chinese discourse. Therefore some people may do the same things in public as they do at home, like shouting, without even register the improperness of such action. But with urban life flourishing, “public sphere” is becoming a more and more clear concept in China, and is defining new code of behaviours for citizens.
      I do hope situations will change, without implementing extreme measures.

      • Eli Arakian

        May 11, 2016 at 10:39 am

        Just admit that the Chinese are rude and wrong to behave in such a manner.

        There is no logical sense in bringing in government policy. We are not talking about governments here.

        This is plain simple common sense. I have been to China more than 20 times the past decade. I know the kind of savages existing there

      • Cheng

        May 30, 2016 at 11:38 am

        one thing for sure, the chinese tourist are no manner and extremely rude. so be nice and respect to local law. I met a chinese tourist in our local bank that they didnt want to queue and it was so chaotic because the security of this bank dragged the tourist out from the bank. Just queue and respect local law is easy, and why they should ignore it? I am chinese also but I live and grow in Indonesia. So we are also dislike with chinese tourist because of all their manners!

      • octobercabbages

        July 23, 2016 at 11:34 pm

        IMO, one issue with what you are saying is that traveling is not a “right”, it’s a privilege. A country has every right to enforce policies to shield their citizens against foreigners they feel interrupt their social norms. I live in a highly populated Chinese area and even though socially they aren’t as bad as mainlanders who are traveling for their first times, they still do things that aren’t okay in western culture. No sense of personal space, usually very loud, and usually a bit pushy. It’s not on the level as a city in China but still needs to be remedied. Chinese people need to adapt to western culture if they are going to earn and do business and live in western culture. It’s that simple. When you move to another country the intention should be to learn their cultures and customs instead of inundating them with yours. Learn the language and adapt and you will soften people’s perceptions towards you.

    • ImnotchineseBUTYOUSHOULDBESMART

      May 31, 2016 at 7:41 pm

      not if I contributed a huge amount of money to your household income, then you might think to have the lamp for the sake of me to visit your house more often. Economically chinese tourists does give a good impact to the hosting countries and I agree that some of them behave very badly. The tour agency (they usually grouping in tour) should give manner and cultural education before going abroad. and the embassy (I agree with you) should give handbook for their country information (do and donts) before they go abroad. Its also applicable if the host country issue several FINES (yes, its your own home anyway, feel free to fine everyone who missbehave) in term of cleanliness or being loud in public transport, etc.

    • Andrew

      January 12, 2017 at 5:29 am

      Isn’t that against “human right” and “freedom” which your countries in the West so thoroughly cherished? Your western countries have always criticized the former Soviet bloc for limiting the freedom of movement of their citizens.

      • Tony

        June 4, 2017 at 6:55 pm

        Chinese think human rights only apply to Westerners so why should they apply to you? That’s too ironic. You played yourself. Chinese tourists are unbearably crass and need to adapt to the rest of the world’s standard.

  3. Max

    April 7, 2016 at 5:21 pm

    Chinese people are extremely nice and friendly. Our western world is very different to them but calling them rude because of laud talks is simply stupid. Go and visit Asia – you will see why they spit, why they squat and you will never call them rude. I wonder what kind of train cars you will provide for the nations that like to blow up TNT or shoot passengers on trains…

    • JM

      April 22, 2016 at 7:25 pm

      I’ve lived in Asia for 5 years now, Mainland China for 3 of those years. I’m leaving in 40 days and I’m never coming back.

      They’re rude. They’re pigs, in fact. They push to the front of the line when they know they can get away with it. They chew loudly and slurp, they cough without covering their mouths, they belch and fart and smoke in elevators, they get on trains before letting people off them, they shit on the floor if the toilet is a Western style one, and they have no idea it’s fucking disgusting behaviour.

      I’m not talking about a few of them. I’m talking about 99.9% of them. And there are a billion and a half of them.

      They’re brewing the Superbug within their disgusting habits which will wipe out the world, and they’re coming in droves.

      • ImnotchineseBUTYOUSHOULDBESMART

        May 31, 2016 at 7:46 pm

        calm down. You showing us how intolerant you are to cultural differences. I never really saw those you have mentioned above (I am asian who have lived in many asian countries and also western countries). Many countries are still in developing phase and not as advance as it is in the west. You might think how we see western people who are “rude” as theyre not talking to each other, always COMPLAINING about their life and everything around them, death staring other people from different race, etc. But I am not gonna bash them as I know everybody is different regardless where they come from.

      • Emmons

        June 26, 2017 at 10:01 am

        I have been here for 1 month and have witnessed the same behaviors. I am also looking forward to returning to my country and have no plans of ever coming back here.

      • Maddog

        July 21, 2018 at 9:53 am

        I agree disgusting people.

    • CJ

      June 3, 2016 at 8:57 pm

      I’m Asian and its not true that “Asians” spit. Its predominantly people from the mainland China. I lived in Singapore and Malaysia and the Chinese Singaporeans and Malaysians hates being associated with the people from Mainland. The reason is that a lot of them (not all mind you) don’t have manners and very disrespectful. And there are cases where tourists defecate in train stations, not on the toilet, but on the platform.

    • jim duncan

      December 12, 2016 at 10:58 pm

      they are rude and obnoxious at best and that is the majority of them…the polite ones are rare

  4. J.K

    April 27, 2016 at 7:21 am

    If mainland Chinese can’t sit on the western toilet, then they need to think twice before travelling overseas. I can’t squat, don’t like people spitting and loud, therefore I will never consider to travel to mainland China. Travelling should be pleasant and with pleasure, and it is a chance for most of us to rewind ourselves. We travel to other countries because we appreciate their culture and sceneries, not because that’s what others do. Unfortunately we had so many unpleasant experiences with the Mailand Chinese tourists. In one instance, while I was shopping in a boutique, I pulled out of one parka from the rack, suddenly one mainland Chinese man came to grab from me and didn’t want to let go. Luckily the shop assistance saw it and told him to stop it. We were so shocked, because I don’t think anything would be more embarrassing than that kind of behaviour. For those reasons we would try our best to avoid the mainland Chinese while we travel as their behaviours does affect us enormously, and we are sure they are from mainland China; they are not Singaporians, Malaysian or Taiwanese. The westerners can differentiate clearly as mainland Chinese looks, talks, behaves and dresses different from others especially the males spit and clear their throat constantly. Also some of those men would constantly stare at the women and even walk extremely close to them. I don’t think Switzerland government is discriminating them as the tourism is very important to the country. Their tourists are from all over the world not just from mainland China. People from other places don’t need to put up with the mainland Chinese’s bad behaviours just because they don’t want to change. There are rules to follow everywhere, if we travel to China, we are expected to follow their rules as well. If they don’t like it, don’t come! That simple! Just don’t expect other people to tolerate them.

    • May Ho

      April 28, 2016 at 5:48 pm

      I agree. You have the right to invite who gets to visit your house!

  5. Clatterbuck

    May 11, 2016 at 6:52 pm

    I guess tourists from the U.S. don’t seem so awful now, do they? We might be loud and a little pushy but we know how to use a toilet.

    • PI

      May 13, 2016 at 5:52 am

      You are absolutely right, ten years ago we used to complained about Yankees in this way except those part about toilet but today Chinese are far worse in every ways .

  6. Abc123

    May 18, 2016 at 4:30 am

    This is interesting. I am currently learning about the Civil Rights Movement in my history class, but an issue or a topic like this we never discussed. What Switzerland is doing sounds like what America did in the late 1890s, and that is, separate but equal facilities. For Switzerland, that may just have to be done if we don’t want Chinese tourists trying to spoil the beautiful country (thank goodness nothing like that happened). They should exclude the bad tourists. In America, Asians are known as the model minority, but tourists? Not so much. They think that just because they are not residents that they can do whatever like breaking rules and such. Sooner or later, we’ll see countries banning tourists and then what will the Chinese government do? We can only anticipate defense! 🙂

  7. Anoymous

    June 3, 2016 at 7:57 pm

    So when you have some bad apples in the mix you blame the entire race or country. So can we blame ALL Americans are rapist and murderer “The civilian employee of a U.S. military base in Okinawa Prefecture who was arrested Thursday over the death of a Japanese woman has admitted raping her before strangling and stabbing her to death and transporting her body in a suitcase, investigative sources said Saturday”, ALL British as pedophiles and child rapist “UK’s ‘worst pedophile’ faces multiple life sentences for raping children in Malaysia, Cambodia” , ALL Mexicans are drug dealers, “Chapo Guzman, Net Worth: $1 Billion. Until his arrest in 2014, Loera was considered the most powerful drug trafficker in the world by the United States Department of Treasury. He was the leader of the most powerful cartel in the world today; the Sinaloa Cartel in Mexico” and so on and on?

    Talking about respecting other country laws, believe it or not it goes both ways. Here is an example, police in Malaysia have arrested four foreigners believed to have been part of a group of tourists who stripped naked at the summit of Mount Kinabalu.
    The arrested tourists were two Canadian brothers, a Dutch woman and a British woman aged between 20 and 33″. What do you have to say about that.

    • Ross

      August 29, 2016 at 9:03 am

      I have to say that’s awesome they were arrested for nudity and you just proved yourself wrong! They WERE punished for there inconsiderate, stupid and rude actions and should be banned from Malaysia. The other points mentioned are very extreme cases. Chinese being rude travelling is not an extreme case and happens more often than not, maybe not to the extreme of deficatng on the floor but loud, pushy, spitting and obnoxious behaviour are common.

  8. chinese are rude

    June 9, 2016 at 6:47 am

    they are loud
    they don’t know how to queue
    they push and elbow and they don’t say sorry
    they slurp and eat loudly
    they don’t wash their hands
    they spit everywhere
    they throw their trash everywhere
    they are just plain rude and uncivilized
    you are not the only tourists in the world. take your corruption money somewhere else!

    • Jenna Greenbank

      July 13, 2016 at 12:06 pm

      Wow your a racist cunt ????I’m not even asian and I can clearly see that. Just because a culture may be dissimilar to yours in ways does not give you any right to discriminate, just be accepting of new ideologies and learn from one another!

      • octobercabbages

        July 23, 2016 at 11:48 pm

        Actually Jenna you are wrong. They have every right to discriminate and to generalize. You can’t brag about freedom of speech and then say it is only for people with similar principles than you. Chinese people can be considered rude to western cultures. It doesn’t make one a racist just to say it. That word is thrown around so loosely these days it cheapens it. With that being said, I live in a primarily Chinese are in the US and I love it. Yes, they have trouble queuing at times and their lack of personal space can be disconcerting, but they are also very peaceful and have a great sense of community. They tend to mind their own business and do very well in business. I can say a lot of positives about them along with the negatives but it doesn’t change the fact that they need to change some fundamental things as they entrench more in western culture. Sometimes stereotypes are there for a reason. Try not to be so afraid of them and learn to laugh about it all.

        • S.K.

          September 18, 2016 at 7:01 am

          I agree with a lot your wrote October. I do not think it’s racist to notice cultural clashes and complain about them. Though very guilty of complaining about stuff, I doubt it’s very productive! 🙂 I think people should try hard to learn as much as they can about the culture they are visiting. In my experience, the Chinese are generally being less successful at that. Perhaps they aren’t even aware that they should, which is what makes them so-called “Bad Tourists”. I am reminded of the cultural obstinance in the novel The Ugly American though this time it would be The Ugly Chinese.
          As for the racially charged prodding from others: I am tired of being the race (white) that is everyone’s scapegoat for racial and cultural complications/victimization. I am not individually responsible for institutional imbalance/discord nor should I be personally attacked or implicated in such issues. I care that people are hurting but if I am made to hurt also it will not alleviate the hurting of others. People are responsible for their own realities and feelings. I cannot be sick enough for others to get well so to speak.
          I got too serious! “Learn to laugh about it all.” I like that you said that most of all! 🙂

      • Ping Pong

        February 11, 2017 at 8:13 pm

        You should seriously visit vancouver bc…and you will retract that statement in a matter of minutes.

    • over canada

      September 21, 2016 at 1:03 pm

      generalize much? let’s just match taht for a bit….
      americans incest much? White trash much? war monger much?
      hispanics illegal much?
      blacks criminal much? Loud?
      germans nazi much?
      generalizing…maybe you can comprehend or maybe not… that this generalizing thing is little much?

      • Ping Pong

        February 11, 2017 at 8:38 pm

        Idea!

        Lets pool our $ together.

        Buy an island.
        Ake it a tourist hot spot for chinese ppl…and make it so they kind of dissapear.

        Then sell the meat of their bodies back to them as organic tofu?

        I need some help.

        (With crowd funding )

        Lmfao

  9. Bart Tucker

    June 9, 2016 at 11:58 pm

    I live in Vancouver which has been taken over and hijacked by Chinese immigrants in the past 25 years. I grew up with a few Chinese who had a good reputation and most Caucasians respected them. Twenty five years later having had exposure to the worst elements of Hong Kong and now Mainland Chinese people, I have absolutely no desire to visit either China or Hong Kong. The worst ones are the nouveau rich who think that they own the world, everyone hates them. Our house prices have skyrocketed because they are speculating in our real estate market with their criminally obtained money. Nobody except the rich can afford to own property. Our politicians won’t do anything about it because they have been bribed to the hilt by Chinese interests.

    • Canadian

      August 5, 2016 at 3:25 am

      I’m from Vancouver as well and seriously resent my hometown for what it’s become. They make no efforts to assimilate into our community. They come, buy up our property at ridiculously inflated prices, send their children to our schools, use our health care resources, and then make their money overseas resulting in no benefit to our job creation and economy. Half of the disgustingly overpriced homes in Vancouver don’t even have anyone actively living in them! They don’t seem to have any respect for Canada and the people who live there, they just see it as something that’s theirs because they have money. As mentioned they’re rude, they spit, I once saw a Chinese woman let her toddler grandson openly relive himself into a trash can in a mall when a bathroom was only a few more feet away. They have no respect for personal space, they wander aimlessly and have no care whether they’re blocking the way. Even if you say ‘excuse me’ to them they’ll hardly act like they even noticed. They only associate with other mainlanders so many of them, especially the older generation, come to Canada and don’t even bother learning a word of English. Given that they comprise such a large part of the Vancouver population it has made for a very unfriendly and isolating vibe in the city. No one talks to each other. No one even notices you exist.

      • Ping Pong

        February 11, 2017 at 8:24 pm

        This is so true.

        Wtf do we do?

        Can we please start ahem…. eliminating them?

    • over canada

      September 21, 2016 at 1:06 pm

      Envious? Jealous much? Maybe you are old enough to understand that cash is king not “your individual opinion” on a given matter. “vancouver according to how tucker wants it” is not how vancouver operates. lol

      • get the chinese out

        November 17, 2016 at 12:31 pm

        Yes, I am sure he and all Canadians are envious of the Asiatic heathen trash coming over. Why would Canadians be jealous of people from a country so crappy they have to leave and immigrate to a new one?

        Vancouver according to how Canadians, not filthy foreigners want it is how Vancouver should operate.

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:00 pm

      I agree with you bro. I also live in bc….

      I hate to say it… but..

      All i can see on here is

      He says

      She says

      Lets see what Isis
      🙂

      Please go away. And if not… well.. this allows us to figure out how to lets say… cut our losses quickly. Eh?

      Xiexie!

  10. Sasha

    June 24, 2016 at 12:48 pm

    I also would like to mention the attitude of the chinese travellers to a local guide, that can be extremely rude, impolite and ignorant and not respectful to a different culture at all! I have an example of a Chinese girl arriving in St Petersburg, which is acknowledged to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world. All places of interest were not beautiful, the map of the Hermitage was drawn by silly people as she couldn’t figure out where we were. The local guide overworked regularly (15 hours per day), but all that she heard was some grumbling. This girl’s name is 王愉媛, the next year she is going to the US. Perhaps this info might be helpful to a guide who will google her name. Each nation has tourists, who do form the wrong kind of impression about the whole nation. For the positive image of a country on the international arena, these tourists really should be kept away from travelling abroad.

  11. John

    July 6, 2016 at 5:48 am

    Hi Folks,

    Well I see you have covered everything I have observed about the Chinese both here in my country and in other countries.
    I travel to a few Asian countries about four times a year.
    But what really drives me mad about the arrogant filthy Chinese men is their attitude towards women in general.
    When I travelled overseas to be with my pregnant girlfriend I noticed not one Chinese man would allow her to enter the lift first and the same when leaving a lift. These arrogant little men are so full of their own importance.
    The Chinese find it quite acceptable to push women aside. Please remember the golden rule….LADIES FIRST.

    Regards to everyone.

  12. Russian

    July 10, 2016 at 8:02 pm

    The farting and burping in public, spitting in the public pools and scrubbing your dead skin off in the community hot tub, double parking those 300k cars because 1 spot isn’t good enough (I don’t do that in my range rover). That’s what comes to my mind from my experience living in Vancouver. The mainlanders that come here don’t even bother to learn the language, open businesses that sometimes don’t have a single person who’s fluent in English to accommodate the ACTUAL locals, or properly pay taxes (many sources say the richest Chinese here offshore their money and don’t better our economy just cause inflation, and literally pay less taxes than actual citizens even though they’re multimillionaires (I.e. Sneaky and cheap)). I’ve talked to many Hong kongers (who actually attempt to learn English, usually) and they agree that a lot of mainlanders have no class or respect for anyone beyond their immediate social circle.
    So I challenge you mainlanders who disagree with me, to encourage your fellow brothers and sisters to come here to assimilate and respect the societal infrastructure that is here. Don’t fart and floss your teeth at restaurants, use turn signals, etc.

  13. Matty

    July 21, 2016 at 7:40 am

    Nasty filthy chinese live amongst rats, spit everywhere caugh up spit in resturants nasty classless filth holes they are, but hey I would love to get my hands on a cute bigass chinese girl you can belive that.

    • Aussie

      August 11, 2016 at 1:35 am

      Agree, not all are rude arrogant, dirty, bullying two faced pigs, but they seem to have a high percentage of them.

      I also refuse to do business with them, they make and break promises, deceive, do not keep their word, pray to money and greed. Can’t trust them for the most part.

      They will put Australia and the world into the gutter.

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:28 pm

      Bro i believe it. They are so stupid.. they value men over their own women… which is good news for us. Lets fick all their women.. dilute their bloodline… then all their men will have no choice but to breed outside their race…aka i 3-4 generations… bye bye haha

      • lolbye

        April 1, 2017 at 4:42 am

        You clearly have problems speaking to women.

  14. Brit

    August 12, 2016 at 8:46 am

    Chinese people are hated everywhere it seems. I’m currently in the city of Nah Trang in Vietnam and the place is overrun with them. As well as being rude, arrogant, bad mannered, loud, ignorant and obnoxious I just find them incredibly tacky and cheap. No other race, apart from the miserable Russians, give me such negative vibes. They have ruined Thailand as my favourite holiday destination. Being around Chinese people on holiday just makes me feel cheap. Giving Chinese people money is like giving strawberries to pigs. Thank god the British government makes it hard for them to holiday in Britain with very restrictive visa applications. Long may it continue I say.

    • Canadian

      September 3, 2016 at 2:38 am

      I just spent six weeks in Chiang Mai and was ready to lose my mind! The locals there are at their wits end as well!

      I’m now in Ho Chi Minh City. Yesterday we had lunch at Saigon Centre and while giving our order and paying at the cash register, a Chinese woman came up to the front of the line, started pushing us out of the way, while waving her money at the cashier. My husband had to physically resist her with his arm and tell her to relax and wait her turn. I don’t understand. What did she expect to happen? That mid transaction the cashier would stop what she was doing to take their order instead? Rudeness is one thing but it seems there is also a total absence of logic as well.

      We’re traveling with our toddler and they also seem to think it’s okay to approach her unexpectedly and without warning, in large groups, while shoving their cameras in her face without any care that it makes her visibly uncomfortable. When they do this we’ve began giggling loudly and filming them back. Weird how they don’t enjoy us doing that.

      • over canada

        September 21, 2016 at 12:53 pm

        Went to canada before, never again….canadians are more rude and “white trash” than most americans. The sense of entitlement Canadians portray is beyond unwarranted. (we are beyond kings and queens folks) Canada is a joke in many ways. It’s sad but if you look at canada what are they known for? Making “good products”? Where is your Mercedes? It’s ok if can’t produce cars not many can..then what about electronic? Blackberry? lol What can canada produce besides maple syrup? Hysterical if you consider canada is a “developed country” and looking at what consumer products you want when at a shopping center nothing is from canada.

        • Another Canadian

          October 23, 2016 at 7:51 am

          Both hockey and basketball were invented by Canadians. We export oil, most of the worlds French fries and lentils, we mint he coins for over 60 countries, most of the worlds water slides are designed and built in Canada, and lots of paper/wood products. Also Canada is a world leader is restoring and assembling dinosaur bones for museums around the world. Canada also has a number of important inventions to its name. Why are you attacking Canada? They did not say “all Asians are horrible and trashy”; they talked about their specific experiences. You went way too defensive

        • chinese get out

          November 17, 2016 at 12:33 pm

          China is a shithole that can’t invent anything so they steal IP from superior countries. They use their Asian slave labor to produce manufactured goods invented by smarter Westerners and sold to Westerners (who can actually afford it). Fuck off you Chinese supremacist.

        • Peanut

          June 4, 2017 at 12:27 pm

          Canada has a huge auto manufacturing industry, idiot. Do your research before you sound off. Where do you think Magna International was founded?

      • over canada

        September 21, 2016 at 12:56 pm

        your husband had to resist her with his arm……. isn’t that just as rude as the Chinese lady. Using physical force to stop another as if you were some sort of law enforcement?

  15. Tim

    August 23, 2016 at 11:24 am

    I can vouch for Brit in respect to Thailand.
    Spent one night in a supposedly 4 star hotel east of Bangkok that was over run with Chinese tourists.
    They were pushy, noisy at all hours of the night and day slamming room doors and the breakfast buffet had to be seen to be believed.
    Hotel staff battled to keep up with the demands they were making, emptying hot water and coffee vessels into personal thermos to take on excursions with them the list goes on it was quiet comical.

  16. S.K.

    September 18, 2016 at 6:32 am

    When you go to another country, you should adhere to that culture’s norms. No squatting on the toilet in Sweden, no spitting in the train and please don’t pick your nose indiscreetly either. If I go to China, I will learn everything I can to adhere to their cultural norms though I can’t help but keep loud arguing to a minimum and I won’t be picking my nose or spitting. I probably will eventually go to China because my BF is learning Mandarin for fun.
    Some of my family used to live in Japan and though the Japanese have different and some really awesome cultural differences as I learned, love the bathing culture, I always followed suit. In the train station toilets, I squatted for the first time like a good tourist, at restaurants, I politely slurped my noodles and never plunged chopsticks into the rice like a death symbol.
    I recognize Chinese, Taiwanese, Japanese, Korean as very different cultures and I can tell the difference not only in how people look, but the sound of their language. I’m just an ordinary white American person.
    I now live in a neighborhood with lots of Chinese immigrants and many of them appear to act as if they are still in China, not the U.S. I realize it would be hard to change habits, but the people I encounter seem to be completely oblivious that they are in a place where they should behave differently.
    What’s most irritating is the terrible jaywalking habits, aggressive driving habits and overall disregard for other people’s spaces, like illegal parking and line cutting for example. Please don’t cut in line (queue) in a Western country! It’s a big big taboo!
    I adore many of my neighbors, mainly their children, but I agree the cultural clash is a lot to take!

  17. phuck pham

    September 21, 2016 at 12:48 pm

    it’s interesting because americans used to be the “top dog” when it comes to being rude guess others have taken that title? Amazing how ignorant americans are considering america is the origin of “white trash”. What other country has tv programs such as “Jerry Spring”, “Maury”? Ever seen a wshh compliation video? It’s mainly just americans acting”american”. Germans are extremely rude as well. Any tourist whose traveled to germany can attest to that. They yell and get angry so easily lol it’s rather comedic. What whatever, white privilege much?

  18. Concerned Asian

    September 22, 2016 at 9:32 pm

    Chinese tourists are actually creating a huge problem for Asians because they bring “racism” from people around the world. This Swiss train is a prime example.

    Let me share my experience. I am a non-Chinese East Asian who lived in US for almost 15 years. I also lived in Europe and several Asian countries. I never really felt racism during all those years. Sure, there was always some underlying discrimination against foreigners, but I didn’t experience any outright racial or ethnic discrimination.

    I am now back to Asia (not China), but I travel a lot both for business and for pleasure. During the past few years, I began to feel racism everywhere. Many show apparent disgust when interacting with me. In Germany last year, for example, I went into a store, and the store clerk asked me out! He was speaking something in Chinese. This is apparently because people, especially Westerners who cannot tell the difference between Chinese, Korean, and Japanese, automatically assume all Asians are Chinese. Our family had a vacation in US this summer, and we could feel the discrimination. It’s funny because we are all American citizens, educated in US and paying ridiculous US tax!

    Although many are trying to advocate the behavior of Chinese tourists, they should see how they really behave. Once you do, you’ll understand. They’ve completely ruined many moments of my vacations. I am NOT trying to discriminate Chinese or Chinese tourists. I am simply saying how they are affecting the status of other Asians. It may be their freedom to poop in the plane or in front of a Burberry store. But they should know how they are influencing other Asians. I am considering to order and wear a T-shirt saying “I am NOT Chinese” when I travel. Seriously.

    • Terence Egan

      January 28, 2017 at 1:13 am

      The T-shirt will work. Canadian T-shirts worked for US citizens in China during the Bush era.

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:31 pm

      Please do it. Hell ill make it for u.

      And set you up with one of my family members to mate with 😉

  19. Abc

    October 13, 2016 at 3:12 am

    They only spit because China has horrible pollution so there used to it so they spit in different countries too . They’re only loud because either they’re to many people there and it’s hard to be heard or it’s there natural accent .

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:47 pm

      Camels spit too.

      Monkeys throw their shit everywhere.

      Peacocks make the most annoying sound known to man.

      Im beginning to think theyre from china too…

  20. small businessman

    October 20, 2016 at 9:27 pm

    Chinese are no match for Japanes or Koreans when it comes to respect and noise volume. Japanese people are very respectful in any public environment (in Japan or otherwise). Koreans are a bit louder than Japanese, but they are still generally very respectful.
    Individuals on the whole from Mainland China are simply loud, rude, pushy, obnoxious, and it’s a challenge having them enter my place of business.

  21. I'm fed up!

    October 30, 2016 at 12:23 pm

    I’m tired of both Chinese and Japanese tourists being rude and disrespectful when visiting the United States. No matter where you’re from, you are to be respectful in the country and location where you are visiting. They don’t seem to be getting that memo.

    Visit any national park in the United States and you will very quickly see what I mean. When you visit the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, the sign says “Quiet, Respect Please”, yet I have recently experienced both Chinese and Japanese tourists talking loudly, walking in front of people trying to take pictures, and ‘camping out in the front row’ preventing others from taking a photo. The same thing occurs when you’re in the Canadian Rockies and a bear or sheep is seen. Here’s a tip: whisper, otherwise it might run away!

    Furthermore, most of these tourists arrive via a huge bus. So why aren’t the tour operators educating the tourists on the proper manners when visiting a particular country or location? Their commercial license should be taken away if they can’t operate their business respectfully.

    Personally, I’ve had enough of it, so I’m pushing back and letting them know. This is MY country. If you can’t be respectful, stay home!

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:50 pm

      Fuckin eh

  22. Jenny

    November 9, 2016 at 6:13 pm

    I stayed at the W in BKK and it was overrun with China tourists. I kept reminding myself they are human too but it is very difficult to ignore the outright selfish, unhygienic, obnoxious bad behaviour. I am Singaporean Chinese and must admit Singaporeans aren’t the most refined lot, but the PRC (that’s what we call them here in Singapore, PRC = People’s Republic of China) really take the cake omfg. I felt so sorry for the long-suffering hotel staff (you know how tolerant Thai people are).

    The PRCs were especially awful at the breakfast buffet. Very very unnecessarily loud and noisy. Talked down to the staff. Refused to queue. Pushy. Nasty. Ate with mouths open and loud slurping noises. Kudos to the W management, they cleverly created a separate dining area at the breakfast buffet and discreetly screened the guests: normal folk into the main area, PRCs into the separate room. I really appreciated the W’s effort to quarantine the PRCs, but it wasn’t big enough to hold them all so they still managed to overrun the civilised side of the breakfast hall. Don’t talk to me about discrimination. Why should the rest of civilised society have to respect the so-called rights of these savages if they don’t respect others’ rights to a peaceful stay?

    They seem to travel in packs, with up to 3 generations in tow: Daddy PRC, Mummy PRC, Granny PRC, Junior PRC. The entire family somehow manages to squeeze into one single hotel suite (the cheapskates). I wonder how they deal with the fact that W has glass panels instead of walls for the bathroom?

    I won’t stay at the W again during PRC peak season.

    • Ping Pong

      February 11, 2017 at 8:51 pm

      Actually… there is new evidemce stating they are infact… aliens. Ill find the link and post it

      • Ping Pong

        February 11, 2017 at 8:55 pm

        Sunday, November 4, 2012
        Asian People are Descendants of Reptilian Aliens
        I have reason to believe that all Asian people are direct descendants of the reptilians.
        History
        Chinese Dragons are legendary creatures often referred to in Chinese mythology…
        But are they really myths? Like all myths and tales, there is some truth within.

        The father-reptilian, the one who created the Asian race, was Emperor Huang-Ti, also known as the Yellow Emperor (2697 BC to 2597 BC).

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        He has been said to have lived 100 to 400 years of age. When he died, he transformed into an etheric dragon and flew to the realms of the immortals (perhaps the Moon). Because of this, Chinese people often refer to themselves as “Descendants of the Dragon”, and with good reason.

        Physiology
        The reptilians share many physical traits with the Asians.

        One trait that the reptilians share with the Asians are their small slanty eyes.

        Check out the slanty eyes in this ancient sculpture!
        The ancient ancestor of the Asian Race were reptilian. After the Asians were created, they produced sculptures of their creators:
        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        The Asians are well-known for their dominance in the martial arts.
        This can be attributed to the superior physiology the reptilians have passed down to them.
        The Asians can excel at any physical activity they choose. They have the genes for it.

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Bruce Lee himself was probably a reptilian hybrid.
        When his philosophies became more anti-government, they got rid of him.
        And when his son started asking questions, they god rid of him too!

        Left-Brain Dominance
        The Reptilians are known for being cold-hearted, logical, and calculating beings.
        Because of their reptilian roots, the Asians are left-brain dominant,
        explaining their natural abilities to excel in math, probrem-solving, science and computers.

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Culture, Rituals, and the Reptilian-Brain
        The Asians are obsessed with rituals and ceremonies.
        Similar to the Illuminati, who are anal about their rituals and dates (numerology, etc).

        The desire to succeed and be above all others is also a common trait shared between the Asians and Reptilians.
        Ever wonder why the Asians excel so much at school and in sports? It’s their desire to be supreme and above all others.

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid, Laurin Liu, Mao

        The Dragon plays a huge role in Asian culture. Dragon Boat Racing, Dragon Dancing, etc,
        are a key testament to the Asians’ reptilian roots.

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        The MOON FESTIVAL, another ritual the Chinese perform to celebrate their reptilian background.

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Chinese Zodiac

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Spirituality
        The Asians are known for their mystical ancient spiritual knowledge. The Asians know the true nature of our reality, as well as the spiritual aspects of the human. Ever wonder why the world’s greatest philosophers came from the East?

        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Knowledge of Chi, acupuncture, duality (Yin-Yang Symbol), spirits, connectedness to nature, etc was passed down to them from their alien-reptilian ancestors. The West has disregarded all of this ancient knowledge as hocus-pocus superstition, but the Asians know better.

        The Asian Female
        If you were an Alien God who could create woman in your own image, how would you go about it? It is a well-known fact that Asian women are superior in every way when compared to women of other races.
        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        It is any wonder why white guys, black guys, Indian guys, and even Asian guys, are constantly hooking up with Asian women? It is because their superior physiology, facial symmetry, and advanced brains make them more attractive than women of other races.

        Media
        The proof is in the Media, so they say.
        The dragons/reptilians are often used in Asian-based entertainment.

        The Asians are sure proud of their roots.

        Dragon Ball:
        Asian People – Reptilian Alien Hybrid

        Jake the Dragon: A cartoon about a Chinese family, who has the ability to shapeshift into dragons.

        • Ping Pong

          February 11, 2017 at 9:00 pm

          I can honestly say atleast their women have incredibly tight vajayjays….

          Lol. I wonder why haha

          • lolbye

            April 1, 2017 at 4:47 am

            Obviously, you are a virgin.

  23. G Wang

    November 9, 2016 at 6:14 pm

    One would have thought that a country that could produce someone like Confucius should also produce produce people who exhibit polite behavior of the highest calibre. So much for Confucius.

    I think if he knew how poorly the mainland Chinese are behaving today, he would turn in his grave so many times he could be used as a dynamo.

  24. Huy V

    December 25, 2016 at 7:23 am

    I am currently visiting Nha Trang, Vietnam. My birth place and a city once I considered retiring. Now it’s over-ran by Chinese tourists. They don’t have any manner. Personal space is not understood and respected. I was constantly bumped, and brushed in the elevator. The hotel breakfast area are extremely noisy and loud. They cough without covering their mouth in the food area. The beach is ruined by noise from Chinese tourists and their constant infactuation with selfies wherever they go.

    Four Chinese tourists stay in a room next to ours. They talked in a very loud voice and played loud music in their room. We called the hotel staff and complained. They retaliated by playing loud pornography next to our room.

    After thousand of years of revolution in China where all the decent, smart and educated population were exterminated, China are now left with descedents from the worst kind. I wish nation would start banning Chinese tourists. They singe handedly drove all tourists from other civilized nation away.

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  26. lolbye

    April 1, 2017 at 5:50 am

    Once I was about to board a flight from Zurich to London. A group of Swiss people opened a bottle of vodka and started taking shots before the flight. During the flight, they were extremely loud, sloppy, and annoying. The stewards asked them to be quiet, which made them laugh harder. They were banned from buying beer on the flight, but they were able to sneak some cans from the cart and drank up. This must mean that all Swiss people are pigs and deserve to die painful deaths. How dare they get on a British plane and make noise, don’t they know how to behave when visiting another country??

    I’ve also seen a drunk Swiss man vomit on the floor of a train, a Swiss man pee in a stranger’s garden, another stole a loaf of bread from a bakery, and one dared stand in my way at the grocery store, even after I cleared my throat and tapped my foot. Rude, uneducated, ignorant culture. In fact, all white people behave like this, and I’ve lived in western countries for 30 years. The white race will soon be eliminated, taken over by a new, sophisticated mixed race. Good riddance, bitches.

    • Drifter

      April 26, 2017 at 10:05 pm

      You’re projecting and their will never be a mixed race in the end.

      Guess you’ll just have to cling on to your hypocrisy and racism from that lofty position of yours.

    • er

      May 17, 2017 at 6:42 pm

      You just perfectly demonstrated how chinese has no shame nor Self – reflective ability
      but always accusing other are worst occasionally. That is why people like japanese better .

    • Gunter

      May 21, 2017 at 3:11 pm

      Hahaha…yup…the world over people are just HORRIFIED by the SWISS and their barbaric behaviour.
      Sure…keep dreaming. Now go spit, cut in on someone and yammer in your loudest voice elsewhere. The rest of us civilised folk are trying to understand you animals.

  27. Tom

    May 21, 2017 at 3:06 pm

    One of the Weibo respondees says somethibg like ‘how do they know itsthe Chinese and not the Japanese or the Koreans?’. Its simply you halfwit…because the Japanese and Koreans (particularly the Japanese) are cultured people with respectful societies and social structures and ettiquette. The Chinese commentators can whine all day and feel hard done by but there is a simple reason why Chinese are reviled the world over; you people (on the whole – of course there must be exceptions…i think ive only ever been blessed to meet ONE though in all my years of travel and business) are uncouth, ill-mannered, loud, filthy, dishonest and would generally step on your owb mother’s face to get a leg up. I live in a western country that recently (lets say the last 20 years) has seen a huge influx of chinese migrants. Even when they come to LIVE in another culture, they dont learn the language, dont care to understand the culture or manners, hangout in noisy, filthy ghettos that they seem hellbent on turning into ‘little china’ cesspools just like home….and dont even get me started on the spitting, hawking of phlegm, pissing, screeching and inability to grasp the fundamentals of the queueing system (heres a clue – WAIT YOUR F@CKING TURN YOU SAVAGES).
    As ive mentiones, ive travelled extensively amongst MANY cultures and have done business with many too and have always found plenty of positives and things to like or enjoy in even the most far-removed cultures from my own…but the Chinese? Aside from some of their food (the real stuff mind you…not the baby formula bulked out with kitchen laminate…seriously people…WTF?? BABIES DRINK IT. And u want to make a few extra bucks?!?) im at a loss to find much.

  28. Ron

    June 25, 2017 at 10:56 am

    It’s June 2017 and what brought me to this article? The loud mainland Chinese at the next room. They don’t talk in normal volumes, they shout, whether it’s 5 o’clock in the morning or 12 midnight. Am not sure hotel management would be happy to talk to them about it. I’m in Hong Kong. Hong Kongers are so polite and tend to be well educated, especially the long time, pre-turnover HK residents. Am pretty sure they’ve encountered this problem with mainland guests before and are sick of it. Am hoping they’ll just transfer me to another room.

  29. Spen

    July 21, 2017 at 4:50 pm

    I read through these comments with much interest. It is all true folks. Mainland Chinese are something of an abomination and insult to all humanity. They are without doubt the rudest, most vulgar, ignorant, obnoxious, irritating people in the entire world. You have to ‘experience’ it to believe just how revolting and horrifying the behaviour of your average Chinese citizen is! Its not just the shouting everywhere – even in ‘upmarket’ restaurants the noise is unbearable. It not even all the spitting, pissing and shitting everywhere….or indeed all the pushing and shoving, or the total absence of anything like etiquette! What is really disturbing about the mainland Chinese is the total moral vacuum that is their crowning glory – and generally it is just the Mainlanders that seem to have undergone this moral frontal lobotomy at birth. The total absence of compassion, empathy or morality makes living in China something of a nightmare for anyone from outside this hell on earth. It is impossible to build anything like a trustful relationship with any Mainland Chinese person – even if you ‘believe’ with all your heart – they will turn out to betray your trust and shock you with their total disregard for the consequences of their own actions/behaviours. They are singularly the most materialistic selfish ignorant and arrogant people I have ever encountered.

    I have struggled to ‘understand it’ – thought it may be a consequence of communism – but this makes no sense because you see nothing quite like this in eastern Europe or other places influenced by communism – and it can’t be a cultural thing either because Chinese from outside the mainland do not behave this way at all. I just don’t get it – living in China you notice that their appalling attitudes and behaviours do not bother any other chinese person at all…..in fact ALL Chinese people will defend the most obnoxious revolting behaviour IF you point it out to them. They will defend their fellow ‘chinese’ and you soon realise highlighting anything ‘negative’ about china or chinese people is viewed as a direct insult to ALL CHINA.

    On a personal level the average Chinese citizen seems to exist in a twilight world where the constant irritations of their fellow citizens behaviour just washes over them – They are totally atomised and isolated from their environment (its the weirdest thing). Conversely, the regular eruptions of aggressive violent behaviour, usually while surrounded by a mob of equally emotional ‘citizens’ can happen anywhere at any time in such random fashion it’s always a shock to witness – and these usually will revolve around an issue of ‘face’ – and will invariably end when the police get involved….its so odd.

    I have come to the conclusion that the last 70-80 years have left the Chinese people mentally damaged – there really is something very wrong with the inside of their heads….its like a form of collective insanity. It scares me – because you cannot ‘reason’ with the Chinese – they are not rational nor objective….and appear to have built their own sense of self esteem on the most degenerate base concepts surrounding material whim worship and fake social status predicated on power and nothing else. It’s creepy.

  30. Joe smith

    August 7, 2017 at 2:36 am

    I think we just need to go back to the wild west and everyone pack a gun and if someone pisses you off just shoot them.

  31. Lara Kentt

    January 25, 2018 at 12:45 pm

    I just recently got a horrifying experience of my life as a transit passenger in Beijing (my destination being in LA). The people at the temporary 72 visa shunned me eveb though I had an American passport! One of the douche bags who called himself a manager told me America isnt part of countries that China gives 72 hours visa to. There went my booking to a hotel outside of the airport as I wasnt allowed to leave! It begged me to think of the appalling rude, un civilised and retard mentality of the Chinese who think they can do as they please. This of course means 1- he knew as an American citizen I was by law allowed to get a 72 hour visa to China yet he was a racist bastard OR 2- he was not taught basic laws and regulations at one the biggest Asian airports!

    Then I had to go on and sit in one of the lounges offered by the airline which was a revelation to say the least! Upon entering there we r no smile or hello or a simple how can I help (btw the Chinese anywhere at the airport never greet or smile or offer help) instead after being on the phone for 5 mins the receptionist continued to ignkre me until i asked her for myself!
    Then a manager with black uniform was roaming around in the toilet taking selfies in the toilet and doing make up (so professional these people are!) and gave me a glare as I used the toilet (alright madam! You ain’t hotter than me so i get your frustration )

    There is an essay I can write on the mannerisms and general attitude of the Chinese people in their own country but now I think it is suffice to think having been travellered to Singapore, India, Pakistan, Canada, England, Turkey and Papua New Guinea (meaning from 3rd world to 1st world countries). I have NEVER encountered such rude, callous, sub-human, snob and un professional behavior as I have in China.
    Safe to say I will never set foot there!

  32. Jen

    March 21, 2018 at 1:32 am

    Chinese people are ugly and repugnant. I’m Korean and we don’t get raised to hate the Chinese. You just get to do it hearing their language and seeing their ugly lips/flat noses.

  33. Pingback: Chinese tourists behaving badly: What is being done? - Travel Wire Asia

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  36. Amy leung

    June 6, 2018 at 9:06 pm

    I am Chinese American. I hate Chinese travelers. Loud, rude and broadcast their status even if little. Like a Chinese saying, a frog at the bottle of the well. Their view of the sky is the size of the opening. They are loud and they don’t care. They jump in lines. The minute the plane touched ground, they are up grapping their belongings out of the compartments. I don’t know where they are going.since you can’t get out until the plane is at the gate and the plane was still in motion.

    I traveled frequently. I saw these ibehaviors frequently. Such an embarrass to chinese, especially those grew up in the chairman Mao era,. They are disgusting

    It is not discrimination. They are bad apples who ruined for everyone. Can’t use the discrimination card the minute your behavior caused someone to take action. Self examine.

  37. Maddog

    July 21, 2018 at 9:50 am

    P.R.C pigs most of them.

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China Insight

10 State Media Cartoons on China’s Social Credit Implementation

This is how state media propagate the Social Credit System.

Published

on

Chinese state media roughly illustrate the country’s much-discussed Social Credit implementation in two ways; as punishing individuals and bringing harmony to the collective.

The growing importance of China’s Social Credit implementation is a hot topic in the media – both in- and outside of China.

Ever since the Chinese government announced its first plans in 2014 on the construction of a nationwide Social Credit System to be rolled out by 2020, media coverage on the issue has seemingly been growing month on month.

According to the official government website, the system (or policy) is meant to “assess individuals and government agencies on areas ranging from tax payment and local government bonds to judicial credibility,” and focuses on credit in the areas of (1) administrative affairs, (2) commercial activities, (3) social behavior, and (4) the judicial system.

Part of the Social Credit plan is the implementation of blacklist systems that punish the “untrustworthy” behavior of companies or individuals through various measures. Already in 2013, China’s Supreme Court launched its online publicly available ‘blacklist’ with the names of people that have an effective court order against them.

In 2017, there were more than a hundred regions in China where local governments worked with blacklists. Earlier this year, Chinese media published reports claiming that more than 9,5 million people were blacklisted nationwide in 2017. Those on these lists could face a hold on their loans or travel bans, and will have to deal with a range of other restrictions in their daily lives until they comply with court orders.

In foreign media, the system has been called “Black Mirror-like” or “Orwellian,” while Chinese state media generally emphasize “innovation” and “harmony” when discussing these new implementations.

The cartoons that are published together with news reports on social credit also clearly show the big differences in how the social credit implementation is perceived in foreign media versus in Chinese media.

Below, on the left, is Financial Times‘ Ingram Pinn’s illustration which was featured in a 2018 article  discussing both private credit scores (e.g. Sesame Credit) and the national social credit implementation (for the difference between them, please see our “Open Sesame” article). On the right is a cartoon by state media outlet Xinhua – the same illustration is regularly posted across dozens of news sites when featuring social credit-related stories.

While the cartoon on the left illustrates people as carrying the heavy burden of their ‘credit score’ (note that only commercial programmes such as Sesame Credit actually have these scores), the cartoon on the right shows the social credit as flying over a group of cheering people.

1: “Xinyong” (trustworthiness) flies above the happy people.

In general, the illustrations on Social Credit in Chinese state media roughly present China’s nascent Social Credit implementation in two ways; (1) as punishing individuals for bad behavior and (2) as benefiting the collective, which builds on a more harmonious society together.

 

2: Building “trust” together.

This cartoon above was used in a local government post about social credit and shows people dressed as construction workers literally ‘building’ on the characters for ‘honest’ and ‘trustworthy’ (诚信).

3. Xinhua cartoon: constructing the social credit system.

The idea of literally ‘building’ on a Social Credit System together is also illustrated in other cartoons used by Chinese state media, such as the one above by Xinhua that shows a person waving a flag that says “construction,” standing in front of a number of blocks that form the term “personal integrity system” (个人诚信体系).

4. Integrity above the people.

The applauding and cheering keeps coming back in other cartoons, such as the one above that is published across multiple news platforms. The characters in the flying heart say “chéngxìn” (诚信) , meaning ‘integrity.’

5. Blacklisted people can’t go anywhere.

Besides the illustrations propagating the benefits of the Social Credit system for the collective, there are also many which emphasize the downsides for individuals who get blacklisted. This illustration, published on on the Economic Weekly zhonghongwang.com, shows a person on the left that has a heart on his chest saying ‘keeping trust’ (or: ‘trustworthy’), and the text above his head says “I can go anywhere” (路路通). The person on the left has a ‘lose trust’ black heart on his chest; this ‘blacklisted’ individual sees “limits” on all the signs around him and the cloud text above his head says: “I’m blocked everywhere” (处处受限).

6. Lose your trust in some place, and there’s no place to go.

This illustration published on Party newspaper People’s Daily shows an individual being punished through a pillory which has the term for “blacklisted person” on it. The man’s thinking cloud says: “Lose your trust in one place, and there’s no place to go” (“一处失信、处处受限”), which is a slogan that is recently applied a lot by Chinese media writing about the Social Credit system.

7. Social credit as ball and chain.

To be fair, the illustration above was not published by state media outlet but by various commercial sites, but I still wanted to include it here; these illustrations travel from news article to news article and it is not always easy to detect their origin. This cartoon shows a big ball and chain, the ball says “Social Credit System,” which is tied to the chain which holds a “Resident Identification Card” (official ID of the PRC) and is then tied to the individual.

8. Tax evaders get caught.

This Xinhua illustration, also published on the official government Credit site, shows a man caught in a “black list name” confinement for tax evasion, with the cloud saying: “I can’t move a single step!” (寸不难行). On the flying carpet that says “honor list for paying tax” is another man who holds a “legal tax paper” in his hand and who says: “I can go wherever.”

9. Trust ranks.

This widely circulating illustration shows four individuals from A to D, standing on a block that says “Trust credit levels.” The A man holds a sign that says “special treatment” (or: “favored”), whereas the number D man is put a dunce on his head that says “constrained,” while he falls into a black whole.

10. Big credit is gonna get you.

The cartoon above, by state media outlet Xinhua, shows a computer that has the term “government information sharing” on it, and says: “[We] unite in taking disciplinary measures!” He holds a big net that is titled “Social Credit Web,” and captures a man with a briefcase who is “blacklisted,” and also says, as we’ve seen in previous illustration, that there is “no way to go” for him.

All in all, the message these various illustrations propagate is straight-forward: those who stay off the black lists and behave like good citizens are free to go wherever they want, those who do not will be caught and lose their freedom of movement. They further emphasize that the Social Credit System is a combined effort, that will, allegedly, benefit the collective and make China a safer and more harmonious place.

Want to understand more? Also read our previous articles explaining social credit in China here and here.

By Manya Koetse


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China Insight

Can’t Enter Uni Because of Daddy’s Bad Social Credit – The Blacklist Story That’s Got Weibo Talking

When one bad social credit listing affects the entire family.

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The story of a Chinese student who got admitted to a renowned university and was then denied access because of his father’s bad social credit has got Chinese social media talking.

Getting access to a top university is not easy in China’s fiercely competitive education environment. For one student from Wenzhou, Zhejiang province, the results of his gaokao (national university entrance exams) were so good that he received the happy news that he was accepted into one of these renowned universities in Beijing.

Unfortunately for him, that news was later followed up with an update that he could not be accepted due to his father’s bad social credit standing.

The story, which was widely covered by Chinese state media (including the English-language CGTN), received much attention on Chinese social media this week.

The young man’s father, named only as ‘Mr. Rao’ (饶先生), ended up with a bad credit standing after owing a debt of 200,000 RMB (±US$29,900) to a local bank for more than two years. Since Rao did not succeed in paying off his debt after warnings given, he was informed by a local court that he had ended up on a so-called “lose trust list” or “black list” (失信名单/失信黑名单).

Towards a More Credit-Based Society

In 2014, China’s government first announced plans of its “Social Credit System” (社会信用体系) that focuses on accumulating and integrating information, and will create measures that encourage ‘trustworthy behavior’ and punishes those who are not ‘trustworthy.’

The system is planned to go national by 2020, and is currently implemented in various regions across the country.

However, the public black list was introduced before this time, with Chinese courts in 2013 starting to publicly give out the names online of people who have not complied with court orders.

Additionally, In 2006, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) also already began operating its own independent Credit Reference Center tasked with managing a national commercial and consumer credit reporting system. With the recent launch of the so-called ‘trust alliance’ (信联), a new unified platform that has access to an enormous number of personal credit data, China’s credit-based society has taken another leap – with state level and commercial organizations joining forces in further developing China’s credit systems.

In recent (English-language) media reports, the lines are often blurred between the Social Credit system and a number of private programs, including the Sesame Credit program. These misunderstandings partly come from the fact that both the government’s plans on introducing their ‘Social Credit System’ (社会信用体系) and the Central Bank’s endeavors to build a stronger personal credit industry (个人征信行业) were major developments in the period from 2013-2015 up to the present. Together with the 2013 judicial online blacklist, these policies and programs all built on a stronger credit-based society that governs both economic and social areas.

The ‘system’ (there is not one system in place yet) works through rewards and punishment mechanisms. In the city of Zhuhai, for example, individuals or companies with good credit are put on a “red list” which potentially means they could be praised online (Zhuhai credit website) or given rewards, whereas those put on the “black list” (f.e. due to serious misbehavior or promise-breaching) will be subject to various restrictions (Zhang & Zhang 2016, 157).

Those restrictions could include a halt on loans or a national ban from traveling by air or train. Since private programs and institutions also have access to the public blacklists, one company or person’s bad credit status can affect their status among various platforms and for various institutions – and thus, potentially, could also influence their children’s access to schools and universities.

A Controversial Measure

The recent story of Rao’s son paying the price for this father’s bad credit listing has stirred controversy online over children being affected by their parents’ bad credit listing.

One Weibo news thread on the issue received nearly 30,000 comments.

One of the most popular remarks on the story said: “If it is okay to treat those who are associated with an offender as guilty (连坐), then it’s time to punish the sons and daughters of corrupt officials, too.”

“A father’s bad credit has nothing to do with the children!”, another Weibo user said.

But another popular comment called the measure “effective,” with others agreeing: “If he waited two years to pay off his debt, he was basically asking to be on the blacklist. That his bad credit influences his child’s education is just to reap what one has sown.”

Various Chinese media, including financial newspaper Caijing, report that the boy’s father was previously warned by the local court that his bad credit standing could potentially have consequences for his children too, but that he still did not comply with court orders to pay back his loans.

Since Rao’s son has been denied access to the university as long as his father has a bad credit standing, Rao has allegedly paid back the loan and has asked the local court to be removed from the blacklist.

There are also commenters on Weibo, such as @闪电McQueen, who say the university’s actions are nothing newsworthy: “This is just the [political] examination of people’s records, it’s not specifically about the black list, it’s common knowledge, let’s not make it all about that black list.”

This commenter’s reaction reiterates the idea that the social credit system and black list system is actually not that new, as Rogier Creemers has previously described in Foreign Policy (2016): “The Chinese Communist Party government has always sought to keep tabs on its citizens, for instance through the “personal file” (dang’an) system of a few decades ago.”

Another person on Weibo says: “The people who are saying the child is the victim here should also know that people who end up on the blacklist are generally not people without money, their kids have enough opportunities, it’s just that if they owe money [to the bank], paying the tuition fee for their kids would become a problem.”

As for Rao’s son, whether or not he will be able to start at his new university in Beijing in the new semester, now that his dad has paid off debts, is yet unclear. Some commenters say it would be better if he didn’t: “Who wants to go to a university who does this anyway?”

UPDATE (7.16.18): Jeremy Daum at the ever-insighful China Law Translate blog has further looked into this case and found that the institution in this article, which has not been named in Chinese media, is most probably a private academy. He was also able to verify that this concerns a real story with no fake names used – he was able track Rao down in the public blacklist.

By Manya Koetse, with contributions from Miranda Barnes

References

Creemers, Rogier; Peter Marris; Samantha Hoffman; Pamela Kyle Crossley. 2016. “What Could China’s ‘Social Credit System’ Mean for its Citizens?” Foreign Policy, Aug 15
http://foreignpolicy.com/2016/08/15/what-could-chinas-social-credit-system-mean-for-its-citizens/ [15.7.18].

Zhang, Keting, and Fang Zhang. 201. “Report on the Construction of the Social Credit System in China’s Special Economic Zones.” In: Yitao Tao and Yiming Yuan (eds), Annual Report on the Development of China’s Special Economic Zones (2016): Blue Book of China’s Special Economic Zones, 153-171. Singapore: Social Science Academic Press.

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©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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