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After Chongqing Bus Crash, State Media Warn Passengers to Fight Those Attacking Bus Drivers

The Chongqing bus crash, that killed fifteen people, was caused by an angry passenger attacking the driver.

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The tragic crash of a bus in Chongqing, caused by a passenger’s aggression towards the bus driver, is just one of many similar incidents in China over the past years. Now, state media encourage people to protect themselves by fighting against those who attack their bus driver.

With more than 1.1 billion views on Weibo, the news of a bus plunging off a bridge in Chongqing is the top trending topic on Chinese social media today (#重庆公交车坠江原因#). Some threads on the incident received over 235,000 comments.

Although the incident occurred earlier last week (Oct 28), the reason for the crash only became known on Friday, after authorities released security footage recovered from the black box (see footage below, viewer discretion is advised).

The footage (other link) shows that a female passenger, who apparently had missed her stop, asks the driver to let her off the bus. When he does not, the woman gets angry and starts hitting him with her mobile phone.

The attack causes the driver to lose control over the steering wheel, and to plunge 50m (164ft) off a bridge into the Yangtze River, causing all (estimated) 15 passengers to die.

A big rescue operation was set up to recover the bus from the water, look for any survivors, and retrieve passengers’ bodies. On Wednesday, rescue workers were able to pull the bus out of the river.

This is not the first time a serious incident occurs because of bus passengers’ aggression towards the driver. Similar scenarios were caught on security footage in 2016 (Chengdu), or in 2017 (Guangdong and Yancheng).

Netease posted a compilation of these scenes, where agressive passengers sometimes even grab the steering wheel, on their video channel (see video below).

Other videos of similar incidents are also making their rounds on social media (see below).

On Friday, state media outlet Xinhua posted an article on WeChat, in which they highlighted a scene that occurred on a Hunan bus earlier this year.

While the bus was riding from Hengyang to Changsha, a middle-aged man suddenly runs towards the driver, yells at him, and reaches for the steering wheel, causing the vehicle to swing.

Another passenger then surges forwards and kicks the aggressive man in the face, away from the driver – saving the bus and other passengers from a potentially very risky situation.

“When encountering this kind of behavior that endangers public safety,” Xinhua writes: “Don’t be a bystander, resolutely say no [shut it down].”

On Weibo, similar sentiments pop up in response to the Chongqing crash. A popular comment, with more than 130,000 likes, said: “If you see a passenger attacking a driver, and you think it doesn’t concern you and you’ll just watch the scene – you might actually lose your life in the next second. So for your own life and safety, get up and do something!”

By Miranda Barnes and Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2018 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

Stories that are authored by the What's on Weibo Team are the stories that multiple authors contributed to. Please check the names at the end of the articles to see who the authors are.

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    C

    November 6, 2018 at 5:59 pm

    A nation of bystanders. Smh

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China Media

CCTV New Year’s Gala 2020 Overview: Highlights and Must-Knows

What is Chinese New Year without the CCTV Spring Gala? What’s on Weibo reports the must-knows of the 2020 ‘Chunwan.’

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Chinese social media is dominated by two topics today: the CCTV New Year Gala (Chunwan) and the outbreak of the coronavirus. Watch the livestream of the CCTV Gala here, and we will keep you updated with tonight’s highlights and must-knows as we will add more information to this post throughout the night.

As the Year of the Rat is just around the corner, millions of people in China and beyond are starting the countdown to the Chinese New Year by watching the CCTV Spring Festival Gala, commonly abbreviated in Chinese as Chunwan (春晚).

The role of social media in watching the event has become increasingly important throughout the years, with topics relating to the Chunwan becoming trending days before.

Making fun of the show and criticizing it is part of the viewer’s experience, although the hashtag used for these kinds of online discussions (such as “Spring Festival Gala Roast” #春晚吐槽#) are sometimes blocked.

The Gala starts at 20.00 China Central Time on January 24. Follow live on Youtube here, or see CCTV livestreaming here.

 
About the CCTV New Year’s Gala
 

Since its very first airing in 1983, the Spring Festival Gala has captured an audience of millions. In 2010, the live Gala had a viewership of 730 million; in 2014, it had reached a viewership of 900 million, and in 2019, over a billion people watched the Gala on TV and online, making the show much bigger in terms of viewership than, for example, the Super Bowl.

The show lasts a total of four hours, and has around 30 different acts, from dance to singing and acrobatics. The acts that are both most-loved and most-dreaded are the comic sketches (小品) and crosstalk (相声); they are usually the funniest, but also convey the most political messages.

As viewer ratings of the CCTV Gala in the 21st century have skyrocketed, so has the critique on the show – which seems to be growing year-on-year.

According to many viewers, the spectacle generally is often “way too political” with its display of communist nostalgia, including the performance of different revolutionary songs such as “Without the Communist Party, There is No New China” (没有共产党就没有新中国).

To take a look at what was going on during the Spring Gala’s previous shows, also see how What’s on Weibo covered this event in 2016, in 2017, in 2018, and in 2019.

 
Live updates
 

Check for some live updates below. (We might be quiet every now and then, but if you leave this page open you’ll hear a ping when we add a new post).

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes
Follow @whatsonweibo

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©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Media

Iran “Unintentionally” Shot Down Ukrainian Airlines Flight 752

Despite the overall condemnation of Iran, there are also many pointing the fingers at the US, writing: “It’s all because of America.”

Manya Koetse

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Shortly after Iran’s military announced on Saturday that it shot down Ukrainian Airlines flight 752 on Wednesday, killing all 176 passengers on board, the topic has become the number one trending hashtag on Chinese social media platform Weibo.

In a statement by the military, Iran admitted that the Boeing 737 was flying “close to a sensitive military site” when it was “mistaken for a threat” and taken down with two missiles.

Among the passengers were 82 Iranians, 63 Canadians, 11 Ukrainians, 10 Swedes, four Afghans, three Germans, and three British nationals.

Earlier this week, Iranian authorities denied that the crash of the Ukrainian jetliner in Tehran was caused by an Iranian missile.

The conflict between US and Iran has been a much-discussed topic on Chinese social media, also because the embassies of both countries have been openly fighting about the issue on Weibo.

Although many Chinese netizens seemed to enjoy the political spectacle on Weibo over the past few days, with anti-American sentiments flaring up and memes making their rounds, today’s news about the Iranian role in the Ukrainian passenger plane crash is condemned by thousands of commenters.

“Iran is shameless!”, one popular comment says. “This is the outcome of a battle between two terrorists!”

“Regular people are paying the price for these political games,” others write: “So many lives lost, this is the terror of war.”

The Iranian Embassy in China also posted a translated statement by President Hassan Rouhani on its Weibo account, saying the missiles were fired “due to human error.”

Despite the overall condemnation, there are also many commenters pointing the fingers at the US, writing: “It’s all because of America.”

Meanwhile, the American Embassy has not published anything about the issue on its Weibo account at time of writing.

The hashtag “Iran Admits to Unintentionally Shooting Down Ukrainian Plane” (#伊朗承认意外击落乌克兰客机#) gathered over 420 million views on Weibo by Saturday afternoon, Beijing time.

Chinese state media outlet CCTV has shared an infographic about the US-Iran conflict and the passenger jet news, writing they hope that these “flames of war” will never happen again.

By Manya Koetse
Follow @whatsonweibo

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©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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