Connect with us

China World

Chinese Netizens Argue Over Ivanka Trump’s Visit to the Chinese Embassy New Year’s Party

The visit of Ivanka Trump and her 5-year-old daughter Arabella to the Chinese Embassy’s New Year’s Party has stirred online discussions in China.

Avatar

Published

on

The visit of Ivanka Trump and her 5-year-old daughter Arabella to the Chinese Embassy’s New Year’s Party has stirred online discussions in China. While many appreciate the charm offensive, there are also those who criticize Trump’s failure to send greetings for the Lunar New Year.

While people around the world have responded with panic and despair to the inauguration of controversial US president Donald Trump and the implementation of his new policies, many Chinese netizens on microblog Sina Weibo seem to be somewhat excited about the turmoil that Trump is stirring up on the world stage.

The recent moves of Trump and his daughter Ivanka at the start of the Chinese New Year again caused a flood of jokes and lively discussion on Chinese social media.

 

“Ivanka’s recent charm offensive seems to indicate that she will play an important social role in improving the image of Trump’s administration.”

 

The Year of the Rooster has just started and many state leaders have sent their happy new year wishes to China and the overseas Chinese in their countries through online videos and letters. The new year’s wishes of UK Prime Minister Theresa May even went viral on Chinese social media with many comments about this “very dignified lady with the cute accent.”

Donald Trump, however, was blamed for his silence; he did not send out any public Lunar New Year’s this year, with which he has broken “another” tradition that American presidents kept over the past decades.

But Trump’s disregard for this tradition seemed to be partly made up for on Wednesday night, when first daughter Ivanka Trump paid a visit to the Chinese New Year party at the Chinese Embassy in Washington DC. She also brought her 5-year-old daughter Arabella, whose video of reciting ancient Chinese poetry became popular on Chinese social media several months ago.

Ivanka’s visit to the embassy did not go unnoticed in China; the hashtag “Trump’s Daughter Visits Chinese Embassy” even jumped up to one of the most-searched Weibo topics on Thursday.

A video from the Chinese Embassy showed Ivanka and Arabella accompanied by Ambassador Cui Tiankai, visibly enjoying themselves throughout the tour around the embassy’s festivities.

Arabella, a little bit shy, seemed to appreciate paper cutting, the sugar sculptures in the Chinese traditional art exhibition, and the traditional musical performances performed by Chinese musicians.

On Thursday, Ivanka posted a new video of Arabella singing a Chinese New Year song in Mandarin. She also wrote the Chinese characters “新年快乐” (Happy Chinese New Year) on Twitter and Instagram.

Although Ivanka has no official function in the Trump administration, her recent charm offensive seems to indicate that she will play an important social role in improving the image of Trump’s administration – especially when it comes to China.

 

“Trump must have saved the world in his previous life that he is so fortunate to have such a great daughter.”

 

On Sina Weibo, Chinese netizens expressed different opinions towards Ivanka’s visit and the lack of Donald Trump’s New Year’s wishes.

“Trump’s daughter is a lot more sensible than he is. Trump must have saved the world in his previous life that he is so fortunate to have such a great daughter!”, one Weibo user wrote, claiming that Ivanka, fulfilling a role as First Lady, should actually be called “First Princess.”

Other Weibo users praised Ivanka’s beauty by jokingly writing things such as: “How lovely the daughter and granddaughter are! Does Trump need a Chinese son-in-law in the future?”

But not all netizens could appreciate Ivanka’s charm offensive, and criticized Trump’s impoliteness and cunning strategy: “Does he think Chinese people are so easily tricked? Let Trump play the bad guy and his daughter play the good one? Where’s her dad? He’s the one who should be here!”

Despite the lack of Trump’s well wishes for the New Year, hundreds of Chinese companies seized the opportunity to make the first step and to wish him and all Americans the best in the Year of Rooster via the Times Square billboard.

According to some Chinese net users, showing one’s own best behavior is the best way to fight Trump’s impoliteness.

– By Yue Xin
Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook

Featured image by China Daily.

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Yue Xin is a bilingual freelance journalist currently based in the Netherlands with a focus on gender issues and literature in China. As a long-time frequent Weibo user, she is specialized in the buzzwords and hot topics on Chinese social media.

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

China Digital

Trump’s TikTok Ban Goes Trending on Weibo (and on TikTok)

“Did Trump buy up the trending lists?”, some Chinese web users wonder.

Manya Koetse

Published

on

First published

Just days after TikTok released a statement saying it would open its algorithms, President Trump announced that the app would be “banned from the United States.”

Trump reportedly said he would take action as soon as Saturday, August 1st, using emergency economic power or an executive order. The move comes at a time of China-US escalating tensions.

TikTok has recently fallen under scrutiny in the U.S. over security and data concerns, but also raised concerns in Australia, India, Japan, and Europe.

TikTok is the international version of Douyin (抖音), a short video media app owned by China’s young tech giant Bytedance (字节跳动). The app allows users to create, edit, and share short videos as well as live streams, often featuring music in the background.

Earlier this week, TikTok CEO Kevin Mayers released a statement addressing recent security concerns regarding the popular short video app due to its Chinese origins.

“We are not political, we do not accept political advertising and have no agenda – our only objective is to remain a vibrant, dynamic platform for everyone to enjoy,” Mayers wrote.

In the statement, titled “Fair competition and transparency benefits us all,” Mayers announced the launch of a Transparency and Accountability Center for TikTok’s moderation and data practices where, as he wrote, “experts can observe our moderation policies in real-time, as well as examine the actual code that drives our algorithms.”

Since its launch in 2016, Douyin has grown to be one of China’s most popular apps. In early 2020, the Chinese version of the app had amassed some 400 million daily active users.

The app also became an international success shortly after launching its overseas version, and especially after it acquired popular video app Musical.ly, merging the app with its own platform in 2018 under the TikTok brand name. In the first quarter of this year, Tik Tok became the most-downloaded app worldwide. In the US, the app has some 80 million users.

Various media previously reported that Microsoft was exploring to purchase the video-sharing app from its parent company.

Both news items, the alleged selling of TikTok and the newly announced ban, entered Weibo’s top trending list on Saturday afternoon, Chinese local time, under the hashtags “Trump Will Order ByteDance to Sell TikTok’s U.S. Business” (#特朗普将命令字节跳动出售TikTok美国业务#) and “Trump Will Ban TikTok’ from Operating in America” (#特朗普将禁止TikTok在美国运营#).

The American ban on TikTok also went trending on Douyin, the Chinese TikTok, where state media accounts such as China Daily posted a video of Trump talking about the possible Tik Tok ban accompanied by ominous music.

“Did Trump buy up the trending lists?”, one commenter wondered.

“Perhaps he doesn’t know he became trending on China’s TikTok himself now,” one TikTok user wrote.

On Weibo, responses to the American TikTok news developments are mixed, but a majority of web users express amazement that a possible ban on the Chinese app could occur in the world’s premier free-market economy.

“Haha, a free market economy?!”, many Weibo users wrote: “It’s time to revise Western economic textbooks.”

“Political interference in markets, it’s what Trump does best,” others wrote.

Many web users comment that by banning TikTok, Trump would do what China did years ago. American social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter have been blocked in China since 2009.

Some users suggest that it would be better for TikTok to be banned in the U.S. than being sold (“If it’s banned, the ban could always be lifted again”), while others think selling is the better option (“Bytedance could at least still earn money by selling”).

Weibo blogger Lin Huijie (蔺会杰) – founder of the Aigupiao app – also posted about the recent developments, writing:

Today, Trump has officially launched an attack on TikTok, which will either be banned or be forced to sell to Microsoft. We can’t actually say anything about this; after all, we already blocked several American software a decade ago. But as part of their “contain China” strategy, America banning Tik Tok is similar to how it encircles and suppresses Huawei. As a 5G leader, Huawei has broken through the U.S.-controlled technological highlands, while Tik-Tok has broken through the American monopoly on global social networks.”

Lin further writes that in the mobile internet era, social media platforms are powerful tools to shape public opinion and are a way for the US to “rule the world.” With China gaining more influence in the English-language social media world, American soft power would be reduced. Lin suggests that the banning of TikTok is merely a strategic move to limit China’s power.

Some commenters compare the banning of TikTok to what recently happened to the closure of the Chinese consulate in America and the American consulate in China; if the American Facebook and Twitter are blocked in China, then the Chinese TikTok gets blocked in the US.

“[But] it’s not that China doesn’t allow these platforms to be used,” one person responds: “It’s that they require these services to be based in China and to accept government supervision.”

Despite the major interest in the recent developments concerning TikTok in America on Weibo, there are also those who hope for less eventful days: “Would it be possible for Trump to not go trending every single day?”


This story is still developing.

Read more about articles about Sino-US relations here.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading

China Memes & Viral

China Orders Closure of American Consulate in Chengdu, Weibo Responds: “Let’s Turn It Into a Hotpot Restaurant”

If it were up to Weibo users, America’s consulate in Chengdu, that’s been ordered to close, will be the next hotpot joint in town.

Manya Koetse

Published

on

First published

The US-ordered closure of the Chinese consulate in Houston was big news on Weibo yesterday.

Today, it is the China-ordered closure of the American consulate in Chengdu that has become the number one trending topic on the social media site. The topic page garnered over 870 million views on Weibo just after 5 pm Beijing time.

The closure of the US Consulate in Chengdu is no 1 trending topic on Weibo on July 24.

On July 24, China’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs notified the United States Consulate that its permission to operate in Chengdu was revoked and that it needs to halt all operations.

PRC Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying (华春莹) tweeted on July 24 that the move is a “legitimate & necessary response to the unilateral provocative move by the US to demand the closure of China’s Consulate General in Houston.”

China state media outlet CCTV posted a blue banner on social media with the characters “反制” on it, meaning “to hit back” (or: “retaliation”).

According to the BBC, the American side has been given the time until Monday to close its Chengdu consulate. The United States Consulate at Chengdu opened in 1985.

Similarly, the Chinese consulate in Houston, the first Chinese consulate in the United States, was only given 72 hours to leave the compound, leading to the alleged burning of paper documents in the consulate courtyard.

On Weibo, over two million people ‘liked’ one of the news posts reporting on the closure of the consulate in Chengdu. The most popular comment of the comment thread, receiving over 231,000 ‘thumbs up’ suggested to “directly turn [the consulate] into a hotpot restaurant.”

Chengdu is one of China’s authentic hotpot hot spots, and is famous for its Sichuan hotpot, with many hotpot restaurants scattered around the city.

“I’ve already got a hotpot restaurant name ready, when can we move in?”, one commenter suggested, with others responding that the only suitable name for the imaginary hotpot place would be “Trump Hotpot.”

A photoshopped design of the future hotpot place was shared on Weibo and Douyin.

Many commenters applauded China’s response to American actions and support the ordered closure of the consulate and called it “delightful”, “as long as they don’t take our hotpot recipes with them.”

Others also joke: “The Chengdu American consulate has been frantically stealing our secret hotpot recipes, they’re a threat to our hotpot culture!”

According to reports on Weibo, people were hanging around the American consulate on Friday afternoon “in hopes of seeing some smoke,” with many expecting there to be some document-burning.

Meanwhile, a live streaming channel of CCTV broadcasting scenes around the consulate received a staggering 34 million views on Friday evening, Beijing time. Some people commented that they wanted to see what was happening around the area to “witness history.”

Weibo users shared videos of someone allegedly setting off firecrackers near the consulate on Friday evening.

One CGTN reporter who was reporting from the scene said that there was “no need to panic” because “local residents are having a wedding today” (see video embedded below). The reporter received some criticism from individual Weibo users who wrote it was not right for her to report something that was “not actually true.”

Photos of a man being taken away by the police in relation to the firecracker incident was individually reposted on Weibo many times, with netizens praising the “uncle” or “brother.”

A milk tea and ice jelly shop near the consulate did good business on Friday night with so many people hanging around to see if something would happen. “They’re the real winners of today,” one Weibo user said.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Support What’s on Weibo

If you enjoy What’s on Weibo and support the way we report the latest trends in China, you could consider becoming a What's on Weibo patron:
Donate

Facebook

Instagram

Advertisement

Contribute

Got any tips? Or want to become a contributor or intern at What's on Weibo? Email us as at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Popular Reads