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From One-Child Policy to Two-Child Policy: Weibo Responds

The expected changes in China’s one-child policy has created a buzz on social media and society at large. Although many netizens applaud the news that Chinese parents can soon have two children, some are more pessimistic. “The two-child policy comes too late,” some experts say.

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The expected changes in China’s one-child policy have created a buzz on social media and society at large. Although many netizens applaud the news that Chinese parents can soon have two children, some are more pessimistic. “The two-child policy comes too late,” some experts say.

According to China Business News (第一财经日报), China is considering changing its one-child policy (独生子女政策) to a ‘two-child policy’ (二孩政策). It could be implemented as soon as the end of the year “if everything goes well” – a government source told China Business Review earlier this month.

China initiated the one child-policy in 1979 with an aim to control the nation’s rapid population growth. The policy has been blamed for innumerable cases of forced abortions and mandatory sterilizations over the past 35 years.

The one-child policy has not been implemented in all cases. China’s ethnic minorities or couples in rural areas are allowed to have more than one child if their firstborn is a girl. Since 2013, in response to the declining population growth, many couples are entitled to have a second child if one of the parents is also an only child (单独二孩). But this change turned out not to be effective, as China’s birth rate has remained low, and society is continuously ageing. The working-age population has dropped for three years in a row according to the National Bureau of Statistics.

With the new policy, which the National Family Planning Council is evaluating and promoting, the two-child policy would be the new national standard (全面二孩), and all Chinese couples would be permitted to have two children.

 

“Many couples actually do not want to have more than one child.”

 

The news created a buzz of attention in social media. On Sina Weibo, the hot topic of the “two-child policy” has been viewed over 10 million times with nearly 23,000 comments as of writing.

User ‘Goblin Gucci‘ supports the overall openness of the two-child policy. “I’m absolutely in favor of the two-child policy. As the only child in the family, kids are spoiled and selfish. Two kids are perfect as they can play together and support each other. I think growing up with a sibling would make a happy childhood.”

A large number of Weibo users also questions if the new policy can help relieve the pressure of ageing population in China. A user named ‘80 percent new man‘ says there’s no hope that the ‘two-child policy’ could change the current ageing situation. “The richer the society is, fewer people desire to have kids. Raising kids in China is really expensive, and the one-child policy generation is under a lot of pressure to take care of their parents. I’m afraid many couples actually do not want to have more than one child.”

 

“This policy is already coming too late.”

 

Comments also showed significant concerns about the economic pressures of having a second child. Zhang Ming, professor of politics at Renmin University of China (中国人民大学) also shares his thoughts on Weibo: “It’s already too late to open the new policy, as not many couples would consider having a second child. The one-child policy has made child-rearing costs so high that many parents cannot afford a second child anymore.”

User ‘ENOVAS_Erika‘ further explains: “In China, many grandparents help take care of their grandchild. But if the grandparents cannot help raise the second child, one of the parents (usually the wife) will have to quit her job and become stay-at-home mum. Not many fathers in China are able to carry the financial burden for the family, including the grandparents, in-laws, two kids and wife. We need more financial support from the government, so that we can actually consider having a second child.”

 

“Let’s first talk about education, food safety, property prices, the pension system and healthcare, before we talk about introducing the two-child policy.”

 

This Weibo user is not the only one who feels this way. Many other users urge the government to take action to make it easier for those people who do want to have a second child. User ‘Yuebo007‘ says the new policy will be meaningless unless the government also increases social benefits. “The main priority is to solve the problems concerning education, food safety, commodity prices, property prices, the pension system and healthcare. Then we can talk about the two-child policy.”

Critique aside, going from the one-child to two-child policy is also regarded as a step forward in personal freedom and individual rights by many. “Many people complain that they can’t afford a second child because they do not receive enough support or welfare from the government, although some of them do want to have more kids,” posts user ‘Silent Minisa‘: “I see it as personal freedom. We will have the right and the option to have two children soon – if you are financially capable, then have two. If not, just stick with one child. The government is not forcing you to have two kids.”

By Yiying Fan

Featured Image: “计划生育好处多”: “Family Planning Has Many Advantages”, produced by the Family Planning Leadership Office of Jilin Province, circa 1975.
Source: US National Library of Medicine.

©2015 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

About the author: Yiying Fan is a world traveler and Chinese freelance writer from Shanghai.

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China Insight

“Chinese Spy Balloon” Versus “Chinese Civilian Airship” – The Chinese Words That Matter in the Balloon Incident

On Chinese social media, the Chinese balloon is seen as a weather device that ended up measuring the temperature of China-US relations.

Manya Koetse

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A day after the U.S. military shot down a Chinese balloon off the Carolina coast, the ‘balloon incident’ is a hot topic on Chinese social media, as official media are publishing about the incident and social media users are discussing it.

At 8:17 in the morning on Feb. 5, the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs published its response to the shooting down of the Chinese balloon on Weibo.

They expressed “strong discontent and protest” over the American use of force to attack the “civilian unmanned airship” (民用无人飞艇) after Chinese officials recurringly informed the U.S. side that the balloon – described as a weather device, – had accidentally entered the U.S. and did not pose any threat to the U.S. whatsoever (#外交部就美方宣称击落中国无人飞艇发表声明#).

On Chinese social media, as also described in our earlier article on the incident, the balloon has come to be referred to as the “Wandering Balloon” (流浪气球) in the context of the box-office hit The Wandering Earth II.

At the same time, China celebrated the Lantern Festival (元宵节) which marks the first full moon of the Chinese New Year. It is tradition to eat glutinous rice balls and enjoy lanterns floating in the sky.

The balloon incident set the Chinese social media meme machine in motion, in which the balloon, The Wandering Earth II, and the Lantern Festival all came together in various images that circulated on Weibo and beyond.

The balloon, featured in ‘The Wandering Balloon’ movie produced by ‘US Government’, wishes everyone a happy Lanern Festival.

Another meme titled “Wandering Balloon” drawing comparisons between the ballloon and rice balls traditionally eaten during Lantern Festival.

The Weibo hashtags used to discuss the incident were mainly initiated by Chinese (state) media outlets, such as “The U.S. Side Claims to Have Shot Down Chinese Unmanned Airship” (#美方宣称击落中国无人飞艇#); “America Uses Military Force to Attack Civilian Unmanned Airship” (#美方宣称击落中国无人飞艇#); “The U.S. Side’s Insistence on Using Force Is Clearly an Overreaction” (#美方执意动用武力明显反应过度#).

“Is it a balloon or an airship? The American official and media side all claim it is a spying balloon; the Chinese side claims it is an civilian unmanned airship,” one blogger wrote, showing the different media contexts in which the incident is being discussed and emphasizing the importance of the vocabulary used.

Words matter, and at a time when there is a lot of speculation about the incident, the seemingly humorous way in which Chinese netizens have responded to the international dispute also relates to the language that is being used to describe the event.

On Chinese social media, the majority of commenters see the balloon as a weather device that went wandering and, unexpectedly, ended up measuring the temperature of Sino-American relations – which turned out to be icy cold.

Some examples of the kind of phrasing that matters in the Chinese media context:

Civilian Unmanned Airship
民用无人飞艇 Mínyòng Wúrén Fēitǐng

The balloon in question is described as a “civilian unmanned airship” in Chinese official and state media texts. The word ‘civilian’ (民用) is included in the clarification about the balloon being a civilian meteorological balloon, and thus not serving any military purposes (民用 ‘civilian’ versus 军用 ‘military’).

Attack [on] Civilian Unmanned Airship
袭击民用无人飞艇 Xíjí Mínyòng Wúrén Fēitǐng

The U.S. military shooting down the Chinese balloon is also phrased as an “attack” (袭击) in many Chinese media reports as well as in the official Foreign Ministry post.

Completely by Accident
完全是意外 Wánquán Shì Yìwài

The expressions “completely by accident” (完全是意外), “unexpected circumstances” (意外情况), and “force majeure” (不可抗力) are used in official Chinese media texts describing the balloon incident to underline that the circumstances in which the device floated into American skies was not only unrelated to military / government purposes, but that it was also unintentional.

Stay tuned for more updates.

By Manya Koetse 

 

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China Insight

Hot Air: Chinese Social Media Reactions to the Chinese Balloon Incident

The Chinese balloon incident is also referred to as the “Wandering Balloon” on social media at a time when ‘Wandering Earth II’ is trending.

Manya Koetse

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The 2023 “China balloon incident” has gotten so big over the past few days that it already has its very own Wikipedia page now.

On Feb. 2, 2023, it was announced that a Chinese “surveillance balloon” was traveling over the northern United States. Later, it was reported that a second Chinese balloon floated over Latin America.

As a consequence, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken called off a scheduled visit to Beijing, calling the presence of the Chinese balloon “an irresponsible act.” The balloon has also been dubbed the “Chinese spy balloon.”

On Sunday morning after 4 AM China local time, news came out that the U.S. military had shot down the Chinese balloon off the Carolina coast after the coastal area of North and South Carolina had been closed for the national security operation.

In an earlier statement on Friday, Chinese officials referred to the balloon as a civilian “airship” (“飞艇”) used for weather monitoring and meteorological research that deviated from its original route due to the wind. The incident, therefore, is also described as the “Chinese Airship Incident” (“中国飞艇事件”) by Chinese media outlets.

On Chinese social media, the issue is referred to as “the balloon incident” (“气球事件”) or the “balloon problem” (“气球问题”), and many netizens think it is all about “making a big issue over nothing” (“小题大做”).

The balloon is also nicknamed “the wandering balloon” (流浪气球) in light of the current Chinese box office hit The Wandering Earth II. One of the hashtags used to discuss the events was “The Wandering Balloon II” (#流浪气球2#).

Chinese political commentator Hu Xijin, who frequently posts on social media, suggested earlier that the U.S. side allegedly is very well aware that the Chinese balloon – which accidentally went “wandering” – actually “poses no threat” and that ongoing reports about the balloon were purposely being used to create an anti-Chinese narrative.

Hu’s reasoning is similar to that of Chinese International Relations Professor Li Haidong (李海东), who claims that the balloon story is framed as a threat in order for the U.S. to gain an advantage in bilateral negotiations (#专家称美炒作气球事件对华施压#).

Following news reports about the Chinese balloon getting shot down, some Weibo commenters jokingly lamented that the “poor baby balloon” had been ruthlessly shot down without even getting the time to float around.

“Such a pity,” some wrote, with others suggesting it’s “just a stray balloon.”

One of the hastags used for online discussions of the balloon getting shot down was “The Wandering Balloon Is Shot Down” (#流浪气球被击落#) and “The ‘Wandering Balloon’ Gets Shot Down by American Military” (#流浪气球被击落#).

There are many online jokes about the incident, such as those saying that the Chinese people thought the sci-fi blockbuster Wandering Earth II was the current film hit and that they had not expected the ‘Wandering Balloon’ to be the actual hit of the moment.

The fact that the current Chinese balloon developments trigger so many online comparisons and memes related to the sci-fi film Wandering Earth II perhaps doesn’t come as a surprise, since the movie has been among the hottest trending topics of the past week, and considering its narrative is all about catastrophic events and the future of international society.

Others comment that since this is the time of the Chinese Lantern Festival (元宵节), celebrated on the fifteenth day of the first month of the Chinese New Year, the incident is just another way of wishing everyone a happy new year.

All jokes aside, there are also bloggers who see the incident as a more serious occurrence at a time of worsening Sino-American relations, suggesting the significance of this matter “can’t be underestimated.”

For more updates on this story, see this article.

By Manya Koetse 

 

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©2023 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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