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McDonald’s Celebrates 26th Birthday in China

McDonald’s celebrates its 26th birthday in China this weekend. Despite its rocky journey, the American fast food chain is still popular amongst Chinese, with many sharing fond memories of their first McDonald’s experience.

Manya Koetse

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McDonald’s celebrates its 26th birthday in China this weekend. Despite its rocky journey, the American fast food chain is still popular amongst Chinese, with many sharing fond memories of their first McDonald’s experience.

This weekend, McDonald’s (麦当劳) celebrates its 26th birthday in the People’s Republic of China. On Sina Weibo, the official McDonald’s account wrote: “Do you remember the first time you ate at McDonald’s? 26 years ago today, we opened our first restaurant in Shenzhen.”

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The McDonald’s birthday came with a smart marketing campaign. Every WeChat user sharing the post and wishing McDonald’s happy birthday would get the 5 toy figures specially designed for the McDonald’s birthday with their meal on the night of October 8 only.

7410164egw1f8kwgyekxgj20lw0ujwpzThe special building block toys made for the birthday of McDonald’s China.

Mainland China’s first McDonald’s opened up on October 8, 1990, in the city of Shenzhen.

firstmcdonaldsThe very first McDonald’s of mainland China: Shenzhen, 1990.

But the Shenzhen restaurant was not the first McDonald’s in greater China. In 1975, the first McDonald’s already opened in Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay.

hkEarly Hong Kong McDonald’s menu, via hongwrong.com.

Since its first appearance in China, McDonald’s has always faced strong competition within the fast food market. In 1984, China’s first western-style fast food restaurant ‘Yili’s Fast Food Shop’ opened its doors in Beijing’s Xidan central area. Kentucky Fried Chicken arrived in 1987 and soon became very popular in China.

On Weibo, McDonald’s has over 670.000 followers, whereas its competitor Kentucky Fried Chicken has over 1.4 million fans.

McDonald’s suffered a major setback in China when in 2014 a local reporter exposed how expired meat products were used in different restaurants across the country.

But McDonald’s China sales went up again in 2015. The chain still has more room for growth in the PRC, and is looking at new ways to franchise on the mainland.

The chain is also adapting to local tastes. The Chinese menu offers products such as the chicken rice bowl, double chicken burgers, or spicy chicken fillet burgers. In Japan, McDonald’s also adapted to local preferences by introducing products such as the Teriyaki Burger, the Rice Burger and Green Tea ice-cream.

mcdonalds

On Weibo, netizens share their McDonald’s experiences: “The first time I ate at McDonald’s was in Xiamen, and it was still quite expensive at the time,” one netizen writes: “But my dad spoiled me, and I could eat there three times per month.”

Other netizens also recall the relatively high prices of McDonald’s: “We would save up to gather 50 yuan [±7.5US$] so we could go to McDonald’s; we didn’t really have any money.”

Other Weibo users shared pictures of their childhood memories at McDonald’s.

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There are also users who have taken their love for McDonald’s to the next level. This Weibo user collects Happy Meal toys, and has gathered quite the collection over the past 26 years..

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– By Manya Koetse
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©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Celebs

Chinese Comedian Li Dan under Fire for Promoting Lingerie Brand with Sexist Slogan

Underwear so good that it can “help women lie to win in the workplace”? Sexist and offensive, according to many Weibo users.

Manya Koetse

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Popular talk show host and comedian Li Dan (李诞) has sparked controversy on Chinese social media this week for a statement he made while promoting female underwear brand Ubras.

The statement was “让女性轻松躺赢职场”, which loosely translates to “make it easy for women to win in the workplace lying down” or “make women win over the workplace without doing anything,” a slogan with which Li Dan seemed to imply that women could use their body and sex to their advantage at work. According to the underwear brand, the idea allegedly was to convey how comfortable their bras are. (The full sentence being “一个让女性躺赢职场的装备”: “equipment that can help women lie to win in the workplace”).

Li Dan immediately triggered anger among Chinese netizens after the controversial content was posted on his Weibo page on February 24. Not only did many people feel that it was inappropriate for a male celebrity to promote female underwear, they also took offense at the statement. What do lingerie and workplace success have to do with each other at all, many people wondered. Others also thought the wording was ambiguous on purpose, and was still meant in a sexist way.

Various state media outlets covered the incident, including the English-language Global Times.

By now, the Ubras underwear brand has issued an apology on Weibo for the “inappropriate wording” in their promotion campaign, and all related content has been removed.

The brand still suggested that the slogan was not meant in a sexist way, writing: “Ubras is a women’s team-oriented brand. We’ve always stressed ‘comfort and wearability as the essence of [our] lingerie, and we’re committed to providing women with close-fitting clothing solutions that are unrestrained and more comfortable so that more women can deal with fatigue in their life and work with a more relaxed state of mind and body.”

Li Dan also wrote an apology on Weibo on February 25, saying his statement was inappropriate. Li Dan has over 9 million followers on his Weibo account.

The objectification of women by brands and media has been getting more attention on Chinese social media lately. Earlier this month, the Spring Festival Gala was criticized for including jokes and sketches that were deemed insensitive to women. Last month, an ad by Purcotton also sparked controversy for showing a woman wiping away her makeup to scare off a male stalker, with many finding the ad sexist and hurtful to women.

 
By Manya Koetse
with contributions by Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Marketing & Advertising

Hard Measures for Durex in China after “Vulgar” Ads

One Durex sex toy ad gave off the wrong vibrations to Chinese regulators.

Manya Koetse

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As if it wasn’t already bad enough that fewer people are having sex during COVID19 lockdowns, leading to a decline in condom sales, condoms & sex toys brand Durex is now also (again) punished for the “vulgar” contents of its advertisements in China.

News of Durex facing penalties in China became top trending on Thursday, with one Weibo hashtag page about the matter receiving over 1,2 billion views.

Durex has over three million fans on its official Weibo account (@杜蕾斯官方微博), which is known for its creative and sometimes bold posts, including spicy word jokes. Durex opened its official Weibo account in 2010.

A post by Durex published on Wednesday about the release of Apple’s super speedy new 5G iPhone, for example, just said: “5G is very fast, but you can take it slow,” adding: “Some things just can’t be quick.” The post received over 900,000 likes.

Other ads have also received much praise from Chinese netizens. One ad’s slogan just shows a condom package, saying “Becoming a father or [image of condom] – it’s all a sign of taking responsibility.”

According to various Chinese news outlets, Durex has been penalized with a 810,000 yuan ($120,400) fine for failing to adhere to China’s official advertisement guidelines, although it is not entirely clear to us at this point which fine was given for which advertisement, since the company received multiple fines for different ads over the past few years.

One fine was given to Durex Manufacturer RB & Manon Business (Shanghai) for content that was posted on e-commerce site Tmall, Global Times reports.

According to the state media outlet, “the ad used erotic words to describe in detail multiple ways to use a Durex vibrator.” The fine was already given out in July of this year, but did not make headlines until now.

(Image for reference only, not the ad in question).

In another 2019 case, the condom brand did a joint social media campaign cooperation with Chinese milk tea brand HeyTea, using the tagline “Tonight, not a drop left,” suggesting a connection between HeyTea’s creamy topping and semen.

According to China’s Advertisement Examination System (广告审查制度), there are quite some no-goes when it comes to advertising in China. Among many other things, ads are not allowed to be deceptive in any way, they cannot use superlatives, nor display any obscene, scary, violent or superstitious content.

Chinese regulators are serious about these rules. In 2015, P&G’s Crest was fined $963,000 for “false advertising”, at it promised that Crest would make your teeth whiter in “just one day.”

However, advertisement censorship can be a grey area. Any ads that “disturb public order” or “violate good customs,” for example, are also not allowed. For companies, it is not always clear when they are actually crossing a line.

On Weibo, there are also contrasting opinions on this matter. Many people, however, support Durex and enjoy their exciting ads and slogans. With the case dominating the top trending charts and discussions on social media the entire day, the latest penalty may very well be one of Durex’s most successful marketing campaigns in China thus far.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2020 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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