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China Memes & Viral

No A4 Waist or iPhone6 Legs? Here’s The 2B Pencil Face

“If you don’t have an A4 waist or iPhone 6 legs, there’s still the 2B pencil face”, various Weibo accounts wrote on Sina Weibo on April 1st, making ‘2B face’ (2B的脸) yet another trending beauty hype.

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“If you don’t have an A4 waist or iPhone 6 legs, there’s still the 2B pencil face”, various Weibo accounts wrote on Sina Weibo on April 1st, making ‘2B face’ (2B的脸) yet another trending beauty hype.

Most of Weibo’s netizens seem to be fed up with China’s latest beauty trends. Messages about skinny A4 waists and iPhone 6 legs have been flooding Chinese social media.

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On April 1st, yet another phenomenon was introduced through Chinese social media. The ‘2B face’ (#2B的脸) is supposed to be the remaining option for people without the A4 waist or iPhone 6 legs. “I don’t have the A4 waist or iPhone 6 legs, but it’s okay – at least I have a 2B face,” was the trending sentence (没有A4腰,也没有iPhone6腿,没关系,我还有一张2B的脸啊), together with an image showing two 2B pencils across a round face.

The ‘2B face’ joke is twofold, as it is also a word joke; the pronunciation of 2B in Chinese sounds like Èrbī (二逼), a somewhat playful term meaning “stupid c*nt” or to show extremely stupid behaviour.

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The 2B face meme soon went viral on Sina Weibo, where many netizens appreciated the joke. Although April Fools was “banned” in China this year, many social media users still found ways to fool each other and mock China’s (social) media, along with its recent beauty trends.

– By Manya Koetse

©2016 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. luuk

    April 5, 2016 at 12:12 pm

    You seem to have missed the actual joke behind this, namely the word play on 2B (二逼,“stupid cunt”, generally used as a somewhat ‘playful’ way to say someone is being stupid or silly, the somewhat nicer cousin of 傻逼). If not, then it isnt explained here.

  2. Zac

    April 15, 2016 at 5:44 am

    Confirmed with my Chinese roommate, this does indeed mean ‘stupid cunt’ (playfully of course) and has been making the rounds lol

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China Marketing & Advertising

China’s Peppa Pig Movie Promo Craze: Understanding the Video and the Trend Behind It

Why Peppa is breaking the Chinese internet.

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The Peppa Pig movie promo is breaking the Chinese internet right now. Our latest Weivlog explains the video, its social context, and its background.

China’s Peppa Pig movie promo video might already be one of Weibo’s biggest trending topics of the year.

To know more about this video and its background, check out our full latest video featured here, explaining the trend in full detail – the original video lacks English subs, so we explain the video from A-Z there.

Check it out, and please subscribe to our YouTube channel if you’d like to see more explanations of Chinese trends through video.

By Manya Koetse 

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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China Marketing & Advertising

When Hotpot Gets Really Hot: Haidilao Customers Shocked by Steamy TV

Haidilao is taking its customer service to a whole new level.

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First published .

Customers dining at a Haidilao hotpot restaurant in Wuhan on January 5th were shocked when the big television screen in the restaurant, usually used for showing Haidilao ads, suddenly showed an X-rated film.

Haidilao is China’s most famous hotpot chain, and is usually known for its excellent service. On busy nights, people stand in line for hours at the Haidilao restaurants, that are always packed full of people enjoying the good food and outstanding hospitality.

The incident, that happened on Saturday afternoon at the restaurant’s Great Ocean mall location, has now made its rounds on Chinese social media after one Haidilao customer shared photos of the embarrassing moment on Weibo. At time of writing, the hashtag “Haidilao TV shows vulgar scene” (#海底捞电视播不雅画面#) has received more than 240 million views.

Waiters at the restaurant were fast to turn off the television. According to some online reports, a reporter visited the restaurant a few hours after the incident happened, and confirmed the television was still turned off at night.

On Sunday, January 6, Haidilao issued a statement in which the restaurant apologized to the customers for the “vulgar content” that was displayed on the television, and that police are investigating the case. Online pornography is banned in China, and spreading X-rated films is illegal.

It is yet unsure how the film ended up on the restaurant’s screen, and whether it was a Haidilao employee who was watching the video and then made a mistake, or that a customer was using IR or Bluetooth on their smartphone and (purposely) connected it to their screen.

The incident has provoked hilarity on social media, where some netizens suggest that the X-rated film perhaps was a “customer demand” and that “Haidilao’s service is beyond expectations,” or that people were “eating and getting hard.”

The incident, as of now, does not seem to negatively affect people’s love for the Haidilao brand. “Please don’t close it down, I still want to eat hotpot,” some netizens comment, while others simply state: “Haidilao, I’m coming!”

(PS Want to know more about steamy hotpots? Check out What’s on Weibo’s sister site Hotpot Ambassador!)

By Manya Koetse and Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us.

©2019 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com

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What’s on Weibo provides social, cultural & historical insights into an ever-changing China. What’s on Weibo sheds light on China’s digital media landscape and brings the story behind the hashtag. This independent news site is managed by sinologist Manya Koetse. Contact info@whatsonweibo.com. ©2014-2018

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