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More than 140 Feared Buried by Massive Landslide in Maoxian Sichuan

The collapse of a mountain side in the area of Maoxian county in Sichuan has buried homes and people, in what is the most serious landslide the area has seen since the Wenchuan earthquake. At least 141 people are missing and feared buried.

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The collapse of a mountain side in the area of Maoxian county in Sichuan has buried homes and people, in what is the most serious landslide the area has seen since the Wenchuan earthquake. At least 141 people are missing and feared to be buried under the debris.

Heavy rains have triggered a landslide in Xinmo village, Maoxian county (茂县), in southwest China’s Sichuan province. The slide of the mountain occurred around 06.00 in the morning local time on June 24. Rescue teams are searching for people, as more than 140 people are feared to be buried alive under the rubble.

The mountain slide has swallowed at least 46 houses in the village of Xinmo, a scenic area that attracts many visitors. According to Wang Yongbo, a local rescue official, an estimated 105 million cubic feet of earth and rock had slid down the mountain, which is comparable to 1,000 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

More information / updates will be added to blog below (now closed).

08:53
Xinmo Village: 46 Homes Buried in Landslide

On Weibo, one news blogger posted this before and after picture of the new housing area in Xinmo village. After today’s disastrous landslide, this side of the village is buried in rubble. A total of 46 homes in Xinmo were destroyed by boulders after the side of the mountain collapsed.

09:55
One Family Rescued, One Child Still in the House

A couple and their baby were rescued from the rubble on Saturday, and have been taken to the Maoxian People’s Hospital (茂县人民医院). None have life-threatening injuries. According to Xinhua News, another child of the family remains buried in house.

09:13
Unknown Number of Tourists in the Area

Around 100 tourists are believed to be trapped in the affected area after the disastrous landslide. An estimated 100 persons entered the scenic Maoxian area yesterday. But authorities cannot confirm the exact number of people who left the area and came to the area, because important equipment holding traffic data has been damaged in the landslide, according to Henan News on Weibo.

09:56
Weibo Netizens Share Their Concerns

On Sina Weibo, the Maoxian landslide disaster has become a top trending topic. Thousands of netizens express their sympathy and share their concerns for the people in the area.

A video posted by CCTV on Weibo, was shared over 4800 times within a few hours. “I truly hope there will not be many victims,” one netizen says. “I just hope everyone will be safe and sound,” many people write #四川阿坝山体垮塌#.

10:25
“Don’t Come to the Area”

Several news bloggers on Weibo warn people not to come to the area to help out, since roads have been damaged and many places are inaccessible. Writer Wong Pok says: “Rescue teams have come from Chongqing, Sichuan. In times of these kind of great catastrophes, we trust in our government.”

He also warned people not to share fake news, as many netizens shared a video that shows a landslide and screaming people. That footage is not from today’s landslide in Maoxian, but from a landslide in Kaihua, Quzhou, in 2014.

10:35
Ten Hours After the Landslide

Approximately ten hours after the massive landslide, rescuers are still hunting rocks and debris for survivors. According to the latest news, still more than 120 people are missing, and 62 homes have been buried by the rocks and earth.

The sole people rescued thus far are 3 people of a family; a couple and their baby. Their other child, believed to still be buried in the house, has not yet been found.

A search and rescue team expert told People’s Daily that the probability of still finding survivors in the debris is “very low.”

By Manya Koetse

©2017 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

Manya Koetse is the editor-in-chief of www.whatsonweibo.com. She is a writer and consultant (Sinologist, MPhil) on social trends in China, with a focus on social media and digital developments, popular culture, and gender issues. Contact at manya@whatsonweibo.com, or follow on Twitter.

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China Memes & Viral

UK Embassy Lights a Virtual Candle on Weibo on June 4th, Gesture Instantly Backfires

A virtual candle posted on the UK embassy account was meant to commemorate June 4, but Weibo users turned it into something else.

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The virtual candle was meant for the annual – heavily censored – commemoration of the Tiananmen crackdown in 1989, but Chinese netizens responded with ‘RIP the Queen’.

On June 3rd, What’s on Weibo reported that various Weibo emoji disappeared this week in light of the June 4 anniversary and heightened censorship.

One of the Weibo emoji to have been removed from the platform’s collection of frequently used emoticons is the candle [蜡烛], which is often used to commemorate, mourn, or pay respects to people and incidents on social media.

On Friday, June 4th, one of the times in the year when censorship on Chinese social media intensifies – June 4 marks the violent crackdown of the Tiananmen student protests in 1989 – the official Weibo account of the UK Embassy in China (@英国驻华使馆) published a noteworthy image, namely that of a burning candle.

The Weibo account of the UK Embassy in Beijing has over 1.8 million followers. On Twitter, the ‘UK in China’ account posted the same image.

In order to ‘justify’ the image of the candle posted by UK officials, the hashtag “The Queen of the United Kingdom Passed Away” started making its rounds on Chinese social media. By Friday night, local time, the hashtag page was viewed over 16 million times and the comments started to get wilder (#英国女王因病去世#).

Some people suggested the candle was lit because the Queen had passed away due to illness, others said the death was due to childbirth complications, and then some wrote it was after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine.

Meanwhile, the original post by the Embassy has disappeared from Weibo at the time of writing. It is unclear if the post was removed by online censors, or if the UK Embassy deleted its own post soon after it backfired.

On Twitter, Christina Scott, Minister and Deputy Head of Mission at the British Embassy in Beijing, claimed that the image of the candle was “censored within 20 minutes.”

UK-China relations have seen major shifts in recent times, especially since the UK banned Huawei from British 5G networks and also stepped up its criticism of China’s treatment of ethnic minorities in Xinjiang and Beijing’s national security law covering Hong Kong – which are seen as domestic matters in China.

In light of the various events that have hurt the ties between the UK and China, the British embassy’s virtual candle on June 4th was not necessarily perceived as a ‘friendly gesture’ by many.

Many Chinese netizens found the online stream of wild fabrications funny, although others were left confused and wanted to know if something had really happened to the Queen.

Hu Xijin (胡锡进), Chinese journalist and Global Times editor-in-chief, also responded to the ‘RIP the Queen’ trend on his Weibo account. In his post, Hu suggested that the very fact that Chinese netizens joked about Queen Elizabeth is the price the UK Embassy needs to pay for its ‘provocative’ post. He also warned the American and British embassies that they should learn from this incident to “thoroughly understand the actual feelings of the majority of Chinese people, and [to understand] how their perceptions have become so out of touch with China’s reality.”

Hu’s post received hundreds of replies, with some praising how Weibo users have found a way to “cure ills with poison” (以毒攻毒, ‘fight fire with fire’).

In the midst of all controversy, the ‘T-word,’ Tiananmen, was completely left out of the online discussions.

By Manya Koetse & Miranda Barnes

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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China Digital

The Disappearing Emoji on Weibo in Light of June 4

No candle or cake emoji on Weibo on June 4th.

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This week marks the anniversary of the Tiananmen student protests which started in April 1989 and ended with the violent crackdown on June 4th of that year.

It is the time of the year that censorship on Chinese social media intensifies, which is noticeable in various ways.

One noteworthy change is the disappearance of various Weibo emoji. Already in 2012, China Digital Times reported that the Sina Weibo platform quietly removed the candle icon from its collection of “frequently used emoticons” just before June 4. A year later, Shanghaiist also reported that the candle emoji had once again been removed, making the disappearing emoji a questionable annual Weibo tradition.

On Twitter, BBC reporter Kerry Allen (@kerrya11en) posted earlier that usually at this of year, it is not just the candle that disappears from Weibo’s list of emoji, but also the leaf, the cake, the ribbon, and the present.

A screenshot taken by What’s on Weibo on June 1st of this year showed that all emoji were still available.

But on June 3rd, three emoji had disappeared from the list, including the falling leaf (风吹叶落), candle (蜡烛), and cake (生日蛋糕).

Screenshot June 1 2021 (left) versus June 3 2021 (right).

The disappearance of the emoji means that Weibo posts that were previously made by official media using these emoji also no longer contain them – instead, only the emoji description shows up.

To circumvent censorship, social media users in China often use emoji, creative language, or images to get their message across. To keep discussions on the violent events of June 4 contained, online censors also crack down on sensitive words, numbers, photographs, and symbols.

At this time, the term ‘Tiananmen’ has not been banned on Weibo, but the only posts using the term are official ones about another anniversary, namely that of the Communist Party. The Communist Party of China will mark its 100th anniversary in July.

By Manya Koetse

Spotted a mistake or want to add something? Please let us know in comments below or email us. First-time commenters, please be patient – we will have to manually approve your comment before it appears.

©2021 Whatsonweibo. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce our content without permission – you can contact us at info@whatsonweibo.com.

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